The Prolouge, the Knights Tale, the Nonne Preestes Tale, from the Canterbury Tales

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The Prolouge, the Knights Tale, the Nonne Preestes Tale, from the Canterbury Tales

by Geoffrey Chaucer

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Format: Trade paperback

Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com

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The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:123016412X

ISBN - 13:9781230164120

Seller Comments:

Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 110 p. Contains: Illustrations, black & white.

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ... Chapel or St. Eloy''s Chapel; it is the half-ruined chapel near Exeter commonly called St. Loyes (see The Academy, June 5, 1880, p. 122; and the same, May 29, June 5, 12 and 19, 1880). There is a district called St. Loye''s in Bedford. There was a SI. Loy''s house in Wedon-Pinckney, Northamptonshire, mentioned in Bridges'' History of that county (Brand). Churchyard mentions ''sweete Sayncl Loy;'' Siege of Leith, st. 50. In Lyndesay''s Monarche, bk. ii. lines 2299 and 2367, he is called ''sanct Eloy.'' Much more might be added; see, e. g. St. Eligius in the Index to the Parker Society''s publications. In the Cant. Tales, 7146, the carter prays to God and Saint Loy, joining the names according to a common formula; but the Prioress dropped the divine name. Perhaps she invoked St. Loy as being the patron saint of goldsmiths; for she seems to have been a little given to a love of gold and corals; see ll.158-162. Guillaume de Machault (ed. 1849, p. 120), in his Confort oCAmi, near the end, uses the expression:--'' Car je te jur, par saint Eloy.'' ''By St. Loy, that draws deep;'' Nash''s Lenten Stuff, p. xiv. ed. Hindley. ''We use to call her at home, dame Coye, A pretie gingerlie piece, God save her and Saint Loye.'' Jack Juggler, ed. Roxb. Club, p. 9. See also Mrs. Jameson''s Sacred and Legendary Art, p. 728. The Harl. MS. has nas, which is merely a-shorter form of ne was. Mr. A. J. Ellis thinks that nas should stand, and that seynt should be pronounced as a word of two syllables. 123. nose. This is the reading of the best MSS. Speght reads voice (wrongly). semely is in some MSS. written semily. The e is here to be distinctly sounded; hertily is sometimes written for hertely. See 1. 136. 125. scale, school; here used for style or pronunciation. 126. Frensh....