Intolerance

Directed by D.W. Griffith

Image Entertainment | May 5, 1999 | DVD

Not yet rated | write a review
D.W. Griffith's large-scale epic spans several centuries and cultures. The film is made up of four distinct stories linked solely by a single common thread: intolerance. Three of the stories are based on historical fact: France during the reign of Charles IX; the birth and crucifixion of Christ; and the fall of Babylonia. The fourth tale is a "modern" story of greed, cruelty and betrayal.

Video Release: May 5, 1999

Theatrical Release: 1916

Runtime: 178

Rating: Not Rated

Studio: Image Entertainment

UPC: 014381583922

save
15%

Out of stock Sorry, this item has sold out and may be re-stocked in the future. Hurry, only 0 left! Not yet released

$28.04  ea

Online Price

$32.99 List Price

Cart

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Intolerance

Directed by D.W. Griffith

Video Release: May 5, 1999

Theatrical Release: 1916

Runtime: 178

Rating: Not Rated

Studio: Image Entertainment

UPC: 014381583922


Edition Description
  • Stereo
  • B&W
  • Runtime: 178 minutes
  • NTSC (Canada and USA)

Synopsis

D.W. Griffith's large-scale epic spans several centuries and cultures. The film is made up of four distinct stories linked solely by a single common thread: intolerance. Three of the stories are based on historical fact: France during the reign of Charles IX; the birth and crucifixion of Christ; and the fall of Babylonia. The fourth tale is a "modern" story of greed, cruelty and betrayal.

Description

D.W. Griffith's large-scale epic, spanning several centuries and cultures. The film is made up of four distinct stories linked solely by a single common thread: intolerance. Three of the stories are based on historical fact: Medieval France during the reign of Charles IX; the birth and crucifixion of Christ; and the fall of Babylonia. The fourth tale is a "modern" story of greed, cruelty and betrayal. Intolerance had its New York premiere on September 5, 1916; it was released two years after The Birth of a Nation, and it is widely regarded as D.W. Griffith's protest and self-defense against the charges of racism leveled at him for Birth's glorification of the Ku Klux Klan.

Notes

A silent film. "Intolerance" had its New York premiere on September 5, 1916; it was released two years after "The Birth of a Nation," and it is widely regarded as D.W. Griffith's protest and self-defense against the charges of racism leveled at him for "Birth"'s glorification of the Ku Klux Klan. The film was, however, very costly and not terribly successful at the time; Griffith chose to re-edit the individual stories into shorts and also release them separately. The modern sequence was entitled "The Mother and the Law" when distributed in this form. As was the case with "The Birth of a Nation," Griffith continued to tinker with the finished product during the following years, cutting out scenes and re-editing. But in 1989, Gillian B. Anderson and Peter Williamson created a reconstructed version using all available footage as well as still photographs to substitute for missing sequences; this restoration gave a better sense of what the original print might have been like. This version was shown in the New York Film Festival on October 29, 1989. Among the dancers in the Babylonian sequence was the young Martha Graham, performing at the time with modern dance choreographer Ruth St. Denis's company.
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart