• – Top Movies –
    • Frozen
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    • Frozen
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    • Hunger Games: Catching Fire
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    • Hunger Games: Catching Fire (Brd)
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    • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
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      No. 5

      Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

      by Kenneth Branagh

        The incomparable Kenneth Branagh tackles Mary Shelly’s forbidding creation in this lush and bloody epic horror film. Branagh plays the lead, the death-obsessed Victor Frankenstein who attempts to conquer his fear of dying by reanimating the dead. Robert De Niro plays the creature and Helena Bonham Carter is the love of Victor’s life. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a faithful adaptation of the famed gothic novel, nearly a direct translation from book to screen and the result is a mesmerizing, fully realized and exceptional piece of filmmaking. The DVD comes in widescreen and with the original theatrical trailer.

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    • Saving Mr. Banks
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    • 12 Years a Slave
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    • The Book Thief
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    • Gone With the Wind
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      No. 9

      Gone With the Wind

      by Clark Gable

      Margaret Mitchell wrote her only novel between 1926 and 1929 and then let it collect dust for six years before showing it to an editor. By the time of the film's release, Mitchell's novel had surpassed 1,500,000 in sales. The novel swept the nation, and everyone, everywhere, was reading it. Selznick paid $50,000 for the rights to the book. Selznick brought in a number of screenwriters in addition to Sidney Howard to help him get a grasp on the material. Among them were Edwin Justin Mayer, John Van Druten, Ben Hecht, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Jo Swerling. For the part of Scarlett O'Hara, David O. Selznick issued a national talent search. Scores of famous Hollywood actresses tested for the part. Many southerners (and Americans in general) were upset when Selznick cast Vivien Leigh in the role. The very prospect of an Englishwoman playing the part of an American Southern belle was outrageous. But after the film's release most southerners changed their minds. On the contrary, many said, "Better an English girl than a Yankee." The novel was so well known and loved that MGM conducted national polls to determine who should play the leads. Gable was the clear choice for Rhett, while many of Hollywood's top actresses were considered for the role, including Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Miriam Hopkins, Joan Crawford, Margaret Sullivan, Barbara Stanwyck, Paulette Goddard, Lana Turner, Jean Arthur, Mae West, Tallulah Bankhead, and Lucille Ball. In all, 32 actresses did screen tests for the film. Vivien Leigh was given the part of Scarlett O'Hara on Christmas Day, 1938. Ronald Colman, Errol Flynn, and Gary Cooper were considered for the part of Rhett Butler, but the character was written with Clark Gable in mind. George Cukor was the film's original director. Victor Fleming was Cukor's successor. When Fleming fell sick, Sam Wood took over, but Fleming resumed his position after his convalescence. In addition to nine Oscars, GONE WITH THE WIND also won special academy recognition for production designer William Cameron Menzies's outstanding contribution. The film was the first film to ever credit a production designer--previously, the role of the production designer was held by the studio’s art department head, who oversaw all the films in production. Because of the scope of the project and the amount Menzies contributed to it, MGM created a new title for him. Hattie McDaniel won Best Supporting Actress for her role as Mammy--the first Academy Award given to an African American. At the time, there were only 7 Technicolor cameras in existence, all of which were used for the production of GONE WITH THE WIND. For 25 years after its release, GONE WITH THE WIND was the most successful picture in history. When adjustments are made for inflation, GONE WITH THE WIND retains the second-highest U.S. box office return of the 20th century, bested only by TITANIC. George Reeves, who went to fame as Superman, played Stuart Tarleton. Neither Victor Fleming nor Clark Gable initially wanted to do the film. Gable felt that he could never live up to the audience’s expectations for the larger-than-life Rhett Butler, while Fleming worried that the film's production costs could bankrupt the studio. "Well, I guess I’ve done murder. I won’t think about that now. I’ll think about it tomorrow."--Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh), exhibiting her famous coping mechansm "Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn."--Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) to Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh)

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    • Despicable Me 2
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    • Captain Phillips
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    • The Gruffalo
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    • American Hustle
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    • Tangled
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    • About Time  (Aws)
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    • Revolution
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    • Lcl Pom  Operation Dvd Premiere
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    • Tangled
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    • THE Best Man
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      No. 19

      THE Best Man

      This wonderful 1999 comedy, directed by Spike Lee`s brother Malcolm Lee, stars the talented Taye Diggs. Harper (Diggs) is an aspiring young writer who`s about to hit the big time with his latest book. He heads to New York to serve as the best man at his best-friend`s wedding. While he and his buddies catch up on old times, an ambitious female reporter circulates an advance copy of his new book to the group in the hopes of catching an early interview. It soon becomes apparent the novel is very closely related to their own lives and could end up revealing some secrets they`d rather keep hidden. The Best Man is an entertaining, realistic look at growing up as an African-American Male.  

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    • Groundhog Day
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      No. 20

      Groundhog Day

      by Andie MacDowell

      Once again, for the fifth year in a row, TV weatherman Phil Connors is forced to cover the Groundhog's Day ceremonies in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania -- an assignment he truly despises. But this year something weird happens: when he wakes up in the morning, ready to leave, he discovers it's February 2nd all over again. He tries to tell his producer, Rita, what's happening, but neither she nor anyone else understands -- only he remembers that they've already lived through Groundhog Day. When the same thing happens the next morning, he thinks he's going crazy and wreaks havoc all through the town. More and more mornings pass, all of them a February 2nd, and all of them with an ever angrier Phil. Desperate to escape, he even tries suicide -- but still another February 2nd dawns. As he starts realizing that his exploits are not making time march on any quicker, Phil begins to change his behavior, performing a series of life-saving tasks until he becomes a model citizen -- and hopes it will be enough to get him out of Punxsutawney forever.

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    • The Caller
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    • Dirty Dancing (1987)  (Ws)
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    • Princess Mononoke
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      No. 23

      Princess Mononoke

      by Yôji Matsuda

        Destined to become a classic amongst animated films the world over, this brilliant work of anime from the vivid imagination of Hayao Miyazaki combines beautiful storytelling and extraordinary visual artistry. Princess Mononoke is the story of a young prince named Ashitaka (Billy Crudup), who must journey far to discover what’s driving the forest gods mad. What he discovers is that the environmental insensitivity of a group of humans led by Lady Eboshi (Minnie Driver) has scarred the land, turning the once harmonious spirit forest against humankind. Opposing the humans directly are a pack of giant wolves and a young girl named San (Claire Danes). The beauty of the film is a wonder to behold and the complex theme of man vs. nature makes this a truly amazing moviegoing experience. Parents should be warned that there are scenes of graphic violence that may not be suitable for young children.

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    • The Kings of Summer
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    • Gunless
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