Back to Black

Performers Amy Winehouse

MSI Music (import) | December 12, 2006 | Compact Disc

Back to Black is rated 5 out of 5 by 3.
The story of Back to Black is one in which celebrity and the potential of commercial success threaten to ruin Amy Winehouse, since the same insouciance and playfulness that made her sound so special when she debuted could easily have been whitewashed right out of existence for this breakout record. (That fact may help to explain why fans were so scared by press allegations that Winehouse had deliberately lost weight in order to present a slimmer appearance.) Although Back to Black does see her deserting jazz and wholly embracing contemporary R&B, all the best parts of her musical character emerge intact, and actually, are all the better for the transformation from jazz vocalist to soul siren. With producer Salaam Remi returning from Frank, plus the welcome addition of Mark Ronson (fresh off successes producing for Christina Aguilera and Robbie Williams), Back to Black has a similar sound to Frank but much more flair and spark to it. Winehouse was inspired by girl group soul of the '60s, and fortunately Ronson and Remi are two of the most facile and organic R&B producers active. (They certainly know how to evoke the era too; Remi's "Tears Dry on Their Own" is a sparkling homage to the Motown chestnut "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," and Ronson summons a host of Brill Building touchstones on his tracks.) As before, Winehouse writes all of the songs from her experiences, most of which involve the occasionally riotous and often bittersweet vagaries of love. Also in similar fashion to Frank, her eye for details and her way of relating them are delightful. She states her case against "Rehab" on the knockout first single with some great lines: "They tried to make me go to rehab I won't go, I'd rather be at home with Ray" (Charles, that is). As often as not, though, the songs on Back to Black are universal, songs that anyone, even Joss Stone, could take to the top of the charts, such as "Love Is a Losing Game" or the title song ("We only said good bye with words, I died a hundred times/You go back to her, and I go back to black"). [The 2007 Canadian edition pares the track list down to ten songs, omitting the bonus remix.] ~ John Bush

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: December 12, 2006

Genre: Contemporary R&B

Style: R&B

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Originally Released: 2006

Label Name: MSI Music (import)

UPC: 602517142114

Found in: Contemporary R&B

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent!! A classic in its own way. Amy Winhouse's second studio album hit me like a ton of bricks she has so much talent to offer to the public with this ablum. The lyrics are really from the heart. Over all the album is a must have. I would reccomend this album to anyone who has gotten out of a raltionship or that is looking for true love.
Date published: 2008-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Can't get these songs out of my head. Haunting and incredibly honest lyrics. She has a beautifal voice. This album is the perfect antedote to mainstream music today. Best CD I have picked up in a while.
Date published: 2007-06-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ABOUT TIME!!! This is by far the reincarnation of Miseducation of LaurynHill. Amy Winehouse's cd is packed with soulful and mellow tunes that you can listen to from the beginning of your day till the end of the day. Something Lauryn Hill had. It's about time we got back to true meaning of soul!!
Date published: 2007-03-28

– More About This Product –

Back to Black

Performers Amy Winehouse

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: December 12, 2006

Genre: Contemporary R&B

Style: R&B

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Originally Released: 2006

Label Name: MSI Music (import)

UPC: 602517142114


Title Track Time
1.Rehab --
2.You Know I'm No Good --
3.Me & Mr Jones (F**kery) --
4.Just Friends --
5.Back To Black --
6.Love Is A Losing Game --
7.Tears Dry On Their Own --
8.Wake Up Alone --
9.Some Unholy War --
10.He Can Only Hold Her --
11.Addicted --
12.Love Is A Losing Game --

Editorial Notes

The story of Back to Black is one in which celebrity and the potential of commercial success threaten to ruin Amy Winehouse, since the same insouciance and playfulness that made her sound so special when she debuted could easily have been whitewashed right out of existence for this breakout record. (That fact may help to explain why fans were so scared by press allegations that Winehouse had deliberately lost weight in order to present a slimmer appearance.) Although Back to Black does see her deserting jazz and wholly embracing contemporary R&B, all the best parts of her musical character emerge intact, and actually, are all the better for the transformation from jazz vocalist to soul siren. With producer Salaam Remi returning from Frank, plus the welcome addition of Mark Ronson (fresh off successes producing for Christina Aguilera and Robbie Williams), Back to Black has a similar sound to Frank but much more flair and spark to it. Winehouse was inspired by girl group soul of the '60s, and fortunately Ronson and Remi are two of the most facile and organic R&B producers active. (They certainly know how to evoke the era too; Remi's "Tears Dry on Their Own" is a sparkling homage to the Motown chestnut "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," and Ronson summons a host of Brill Building touchstones on his tracks.) As before, Winehouse writes all of the songs from her experiences, most of which involve the occasionally riotous and often bittersweet vagaries of love. Also in similar fashion to Frank, her eye for details and her way of relating them are delightful. She states her case against "Rehab" on the knockout first single with some great lines: "They tried to make me go to rehab I won't go, I'd rather be at home with Ray" (Charles, that is). As often as not, though, the songs on Back to Black are universal, songs that anyone, even Joss Stone, could take to the top of the charts, such as "Love Is a Losing Game" or the title song ("We only said good bye with words, I died a hundred times/You go back to her, and I go back to black"). [The 2007 Canadian edition pares the track list down to ten songs, omitting the bonus remix.] ~ John Bush
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