Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 11A: 1971

Performers Various Artists

Hip-o Select | November 18, 2008 | Compact Disc

Not yet rated | write a review
Audio Remasterer: Ellen Fitton.
Arrangers: Jerry Long; Gene Page; Paul Riser; Tom Baird; David Van De Pitte.
Berry Gordy moved Motown from Detroit to Los Angeles at the end of 1968 but, like an earthquake, not all of the aftershocks were felt after the initial shift. It took a while for all the dust to settle, for Motown to start feeling like it belonged to Hollywood instead of the Motor City, for the label to get to the point where the showbiz began to eclipse the soul, and that year was 1971. That year, Gordy slowly started to recede from the day-to-day operations of the label, choosing to pursue interests in film and television, but Motown hardly shut down in his absence: they churned out more 45s than ever, releasing so many singles in the course of a single year that when it came time for Hip-O Select to cover 1971 in their comprehensive The Complete Motown Singles series, they had to split the year into two multi-disc box sets. This, Vol. 11A, covers the first six months of 1971, six months that had enough activity for a year -- a full six discs of material, to be precise. The entirety of Motown's 1970 singles output fit onto a six-disc set for Vol. 10, so it stands to reason that 1971 either was an embarrassment of riches or found the label stretching itself a little thin.
The Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 11A: 1971 proves the latter to be true, containing moments of blinding genius surrounded by cinematic schmaltz and funky filler. Genius is none too strong a word for the best music Motown produced in the first half of 1971, especially the album that defined the year for the label and much of pop music in general, Marvin Gaye's What's Going On. This was the first Motown LP to be an artist-driven concept album, a seismic shift within the label that is just as palpable when it's sampled here by its two hit singles, "What's Going On" and "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)," as they sit respectively next to R. Dean Taylor's AM pop and Hearts of Stone's bubblegum soul, two pieces of agreeable fluff that have more to do with the label at large than Marvin's two masterworks. Gaye was hardly the only artist working at a peak during these six months: Stevie Wonder began to enter his mature phase, rearranging the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out," which was backed with the extraordinary "Never Dreamed You'd Leave in Summer"; Smokey Robinson had the great "I Don't Blame You at All"; the Jackson 5 had "Never Can Say Goodbye" and "Mama's Pearl"; Gladys Knight & the Pips had the slow-burner "I Don't Want to Do Wrong"; the Temptations hit a high watermark with "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)" while David Ruffin had a few great singles that didn't quite take off; Rare Earth's "I Just Want to Celebrate" was the peak of Motown's hippie rock; and the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes" proved that it wasn't just Motown's legacy acts that were turning out great music.
Nevertheless, it's those Marvin Gaye singles that point out the gap between what Motown's artists were capable of achieving and the product that the label was cranking out. Blinded by the stars of Tinsel Town, the label signed up Sammy Davis, Jr. to cut a single of show tunes, granted Bobby Darin the permission to indulge in his soulman fantasies, and had Bill Cosby mug with Diana Ross on Randy Newman's "Love Story" for Ross' TV variety show -- and this splashy, schmaltzy sound isn't just heard here, but throughout the lesser-known sides. Often, these justly neglected 45s don't sound like singles buried in the back of some dusty record store but rather incidental soundtrack music for a forgotten television show. There are naturally exceptions to the rule -- the great Chuck Jackson gamely struggles with the novelty "Pet Names," Eddie Kendricks' melodramatic "This Used to Be the Home of Johnnie Mae" has some symphonic force, Stoney & Meatloaf's "What You See Is What You Get" is a terrific hippie blues-rock number, and Arthur Adams' scrapped slow blues "Uncle Tom" has a terrific flip, the insistent dance number "Morning Train" -- but for the most part the lesser-known singles here are cornball cultural artifacts, interesting for collectors and soul fanatics, but they pale too easily next to the unadulterated brilliance of the best music here. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: November 18, 2008

Genre: Funk

Style: R&B

Number of Discs: 5

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Studio/Mixed/Live: Studio

Label Name: Hip-o Select

UPC: 602517776555

On re-order This popular item is currently out of stock, but we're bringing it back. Check back soon.

$73.75

Cart

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 11A: 1971

Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 11A: 1971

Performers Various Artists

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: November 18, 2008

Genre: Funk

Style: R&B

Number of Discs: 5

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Studio/Mixed/Live: Studio

Label Name: Hip-o Select

UPC: 602517776555


Title Track Time
0.DISC 1: --
1.Mama's Pearl - The Jackson 5 --
2.Darling Dear - The Jackson 5 --
3.Let's All Save The Children - Joe Hinton --
4.You Are Blue - Joe Hinton --
5.Sweet Water - Brass Monkey --
6.You Keep Me Hangin' On - Brass Monkey --
7.Pet Names - Chuck Jackson --
8.Is There Anything Love Can't Do - Chuck Jackson --
9.Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me) - The Temptations --
10.You Make Your Own Heaven And Hell Right Here On Earth - The Temptations --
11.Ain't It A Sad Thing - R. Dean Taylor --
12.Back Street - R. Dean Taylor --
13.What' Going On - Marvin Gaye --
14.God Is Love - Marvin Gaye --
15.Save My Love For A Rainy Day - The Undisputed Truth --
16.Since I've Lost You - The Undisputed Truth --
17.Don't Pay Me No Mind - Ken Christie & The Sunday People --
18.Listen To Your Soul - Ken Christie & The Sunday People --
19.Each Day Is A Lifetime - David Ruffin --
20.Don't Stop Lovin' Me - David Ruffin --
21.Love Makes The World Go 'Round - Kiki Dee --
22.Jimmy - Kiki Dee --
23.Love Makes The World Go 'Round [Alternate Mix] - Kiki Dee --
0.DISC 2: --
1.We Can Work It Out - Stevie Wonder --
2.Never Dreamed You'd Leave In Summer - Stevie Wonder --
3.I Don't Blame You At All - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles --
4.That Girl - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles --
5.This Used To Be The Home Of Johnnie Mae - Eddie Kendricks --
6.It's So Hard For Me To Say Goodbye - Eddie Kendricks --
7.This Used To Be The Home Of Johnnie Mae - Eddie Kendricks --
8.In My Own Lifetime - Sammy Davis, Jr. --
9.I'll Begin Again - Sammy Davis, Jr. --
10.In My Own Lifetime - Sammy Davis, Jr. --
11.Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson 5 --
12.She's Good - The Jackson 5 --
13.Gotta See Jane - R. Dean Taylor --
14.Gotta See Jane - R. Dean Taylor --
15.Strung Out - Gordon Staples & The Motown Strings --
16.Sounds Of The Zodiac - Gordon Staples & The Motown Strings --
17.String Out [Promo Version] - Gordon Staples & The Motown Strings --
18.String Out [Long Promo Version] - Gordon Staples & The Motown Strings --
19.Funky Music Sho Nugg Turns Me On - Edwin Starr --
20.Cloud Nine - Edwin Starr --
21.When My Love Hand Comes Down - David & Jimmy Ruffin --
22.Steppin' On A Dream - David & Jimmy Ruffin --
23.I Won't Weep No More - Letta Mbulu --
24.You Touched Me - Letta Mbulu --
25.Never Dreamed You'd Leave Summer [Stereo Promo Version] - Stevie Wonder --
0.DISC 3: --
1.Reach Out I'll Be There - Diana Ross --
2.(They Long To Be) Close To You - Diana Ross --
3.Reach Out I'll Be There [Long Stereo Promo Version] - Diana Ross --
4.Reach Out I'll Be There [ Short Stereo Promo Version] - Diana Ross --
5.(I've Given You) The Best Years Of My Life - P.J. --
6.It Takes A Man To Teach A Woman How To Love - P.J. --
7.What You See Is What You Get - Stoney & Meatloaf --
8.Lady Be Mine - Stoney & Meatloaf --
9.What You See Is What You Get [Stereo Promo Version] - Stoney & Meatloaf --
10.Nathan Jone - The Supremes --
11.Happy (Is A Bumpy Road) - The Supremes --
12.Nathan Jones [Stereo Promo Version] - The Supremes --
13.Melodie - Bobby Darin --
14.Someday We'll Be Together - Bobby Darin --
15.Never Can Say Goodbye - The Impact Of Brass --
16.So Far, So Good - The Impact Of Brass --
17.Never Can Say Goodbye [Stereo Promo Version] - The Impact Of Brass --
18.Heartaches - King Floyd --
19.Together We Can Do Anything - King Floyd --
20.Feelin' Alright - The Jackson 5/Diana Ross --
21.Love Story - Bill Cosby/Diana Ross --
22.I Don't Want To Do Wrong - Gladys Knight & the Pips --
23.Is There A Place (In His Heart For Me) - Gladys Knight & the Pips --
24.I Don't Want To Do Wrong [Stereo Promo Version] - Gladys Knight & the Pips --
0.DISC 4: --
1.You Gotta Have Love In Your Heart - The Four Tops/The Supremes --
2.I'm Glad About It - The Four Tops/The Supremes --
3.You Gotta Have Love In Your Heart [Stereo Promo Version] - The Four Tops/The Supremes --
4.Smiling Faces Sometimes - The Undisputed Truth --
5.You Got The Love I Need - The Undisputed Truth --
6.I'd Still Love You - Ivy Jo --
7.I Can Feel The Pain - Ivy Jo --
8.I'd Still Love You [Stereo Promo Version] - Ivy Jo --
9.In These Changing Times - The Four Tops --
10.Right Before My Eyes - The Four Tops --
11.Reach Out I'll Be There [Mono Promo Verson] - Diana Ross --
12.Pass The Plate - The Crusaders --
13.Greasy Spoon - The Crusaders --
14.Pass The Plate [Stereo Promo Verson] - The Crusaders --
15.Dyambo (De-Yambo) Weary Day Is Over - Hugh Masekela & The Union Of South Africa --
16.Shebeen - Hugh Masekela & The Union Of South Africa --
17.Dyambo (De-Yambo) Weary Day Is Over [Stereo Promo Version] - Hugh Masekela & The Union Of South Afri --
18.Uncel Tom - Arthur Adams --
19.Mornin' Train - Arthur Adams --
20.What Is Love - Stylists --
21.Where Did The Children Go - Stylists --
22.Crazy About The La La La - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles --
23.Oh Baby Baby I Love You - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles --
24.Crazy About The La La La [Stereo Promo Version] - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles --
0.DISC 5: --
1.Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) - Marvin Gaye --
2.Sad Tomorrows - Marvin Gaye --
3.Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) [Stereo Promo Version] - Marvin Gaye --
4.If I Could Give You The World - Hearts of Stone --
5.You Gotta Sacrifice (We Gotta Sacrifice) - Hearts of Stone --
6.If I Could Give You The World [Stereo Promo Version] - Hearts of Stone --
7.Reverend John B. Daniels, The - Ken Christie & The Sunday People --
8.Jesus Is The Key - Ken Christie & The Sunday People --
9.Reverend John B. Daniels [Stereo Promo Version], The - Ken Christie & The Sunday People --
10.Candy Apple Red - R. Dean Taylor --
11.Woman Alive - R. Dean Taylor --
12.Candy Apple Red [Stereo Promo Version] - R. Dean Taylor --
13.I Just Want To Celebrate - Rare Earth --
14.Seed, The - Rare Earth --
15.I Just Want To Celebrate [Stereo Promo Version] - Rare Earth --
16.Maybe Tomorrow - The Jackson 5 --
17.I Will Find A Way - The Jackson 5 --
18.Maybe Tomorrow [Stereo Promo Version] - The Jackson 5 --
19.Medley: What The World Needs Now/Abraham,Martin And John - Tom Clay --
20.Victors, The - Tom Clay --
21.Medley: What The World Needs Now/Abraham,Martin And John [Stereo Promo Version] - Tom Clay --
22.It's Summer - The Temptations --
23.I'm The Exception To The Rule - The Temptations --

Editorial Notes

Audio Remasterer: Ellen Fitton.
Arrangers: Jerry Long; Gene Page; Paul Riser; Tom Baird; David Van De Pitte.
Berry Gordy moved Motown from Detroit to Los Angeles at the end of 1968 but, like an earthquake, not all of the aftershocks were felt after the initial shift. It took a while for all the dust to settle, for Motown to start feeling like it belonged to Hollywood instead of the Motor City, for the label to get to the point where the showbiz began to eclipse the soul, and that year was 1971. That year, Gordy slowly started to recede from the day-to-day operations of the label, choosing to pursue interests in film and television, but Motown hardly shut down in his absence: they churned out more 45s than ever, releasing so many singles in the course of a single year that when it came time for Hip-O Select to cover 1971 in their comprehensive The Complete Motown Singles series, they had to split the year into two multi-disc box sets. This, Vol. 11A, covers the first six months of 1971, six months that had enough activity for a year -- a full six discs of material, to be precise. The entirety of Motown's 1970 singles output fit onto a six-disc set for Vol. 10, so it stands to reason that 1971 either was an embarrassment of riches or found the label stretching itself a little thin.
The Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 11A: 1971 proves the latter to be true, containing moments of blinding genius surrounded by cinematic schmaltz and funky filler. Genius is none too strong a word for the best music Motown produced in the first half of 1971, especially the album that defined the year for the label and much of pop music in general, Marvin Gaye's What's Going On. This was the first Motown LP to be an artist-driven concept album, a seismic shift within the label that is just as palpable when it's sampled here by its two hit singles, "What's Going On" and "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)," as they sit respectively next to R. Dean Taylor's AM pop and Hearts of Stone's bubblegum soul, two pieces of agreeable fluff that have more to do with the label at large than Marvin's two masterworks. Gaye was hardly the only artist working at a peak during these six months: Stevie Wonder began to enter his mature phase, rearranging the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out," which was backed with the extraordinary "Never Dreamed You'd Leave in Summer"; Smokey Robinson had the great "I Don't Blame You at All"; the Jackson 5 had "Never Can Say Goodbye" and "Mama's Pearl"; Gladys Knight & the Pips had the slow-burner "I Don't Want to Do Wrong"; the Temptations hit a high watermark with "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)" while David Ruffin had a few great singles that didn't quite take off; Rare Earth's "I Just Want to Celebrate" was the peak of Motown's hippie rock; and the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes" proved that it wasn't just Motown's legacy acts that were turning out great music.
Nevertheless, it's those Marvin Gaye singles that point out the gap between what Motown's artists were capable of achieving and the product that the label was cranking out. Blinded by the stars of Tinsel Town, the label signed up Sammy Davis, Jr. to cut a single of show tunes, granted Bobby Darin the permission to indulge in his soulman fantasies, and had Bill Cosby mug with Diana Ross on Randy Newman's "Love Story" for Ross' TV variety show -- and this splashy, schmaltzy sound isn't just heard here, but throughout the lesser-known sides. Often, these justly neglected 45s don't sound like singles buried in the back of some dusty record store but rather incidental soundtrack music for a forgotten television show. There are naturally exceptions to the rule -- the great Chuck Jackson gamely struggles with the novelty "Pet Names," Eddie Kendricks' melodramatic "This Used to Be the Home of Johnnie Mae" has some symphonic force, Stoney & Meatloaf's "What You See Is What You Get" is a terrific hippie blues-rock number, and Arthur Adams' scrapped slow blues "Uncle Tom" has a terrific flip, the insistent dance number "Morning Train" -- but for the most part the lesser-known singles here are cornball cultural artifacts, interesting for collectors and soul fanatics, but they pale too easily next to the unadulterated brilliance of the best music here. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart