Shock Treatment

Performers Don Ellis

Koch Jazz | May 8, 2001 | Compact Disc

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Don Ellis Orchestra: includes: Don Ellis (trumpet); Ron Starr (tenor saxophone, flute, clarinet); Terry Woodson, Dave Sanchez (trombone); Mike Lang (piano, Fender Rhodes piano, clavinet); Ray Neapolitan (sitar, bass); Steve Bohannon (drums); Chino Valdes, Joe Porcaro, Ralph Humphrey (percussion).
Reissue producer: Donald Elfman.
Recorded on Febrary 14 & 15, 1968. Includes liner notes by Digby Diehl and Nick Di Scala.
All tracks have been digitally remastered.
Personnel: Don Ellis (trumpet); Ray Neapolitan (sitar); Ira Schulman (flute, piccolo, clarinet, tenor saxophone); John Magruder (flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, baritone saxophone); Ron Starr (flute, clarinet, saxophone, tenor saxophone); Joe Roccisano (flute, clarinet, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone); Ruben Leon, Joe Lopes (flute, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone); Alan Weight, Edward Warren , Ed Warren, Bob Harmon, Glenn Stuart (trumpet); Terry Woodson (trombone, bass trombone); David Sanchez , Ron Myers, Vince Diaz, David Sanchez (trombone); Michael Lange (piano, electric piano); Mike Lang (piano, Fender Rhodes piano, Clavinet); Mark Cass Stevens, Ralph Humphrey (vibraphone, timbales, percussion); Steve Bohannon (drums); Chino Valdes, Carlos "Patato" Valdes (congas, bongos); Alan Estes (timbales, percussion); Mark Stevens, Joe Porcaro (percussion).
Audio Remasterer: Rosalind Ilett.
Recording information: Hollywood, CA (02/14/1968/02/15/1968).
Don Ellis was such a talented trumpeter, composer, and organizer that everything he recorded as a leader has at least some unusual moments worth exploring. His big bands were characterized by big brassy arrangements, odd meters that somehow always swung, lots of trumpet solos by Ellis, and an often visceral excitement. Although not equal to his best records such as Electric Bath, this late recording of Ellis' band is filled with all these traits, and thus exudes lots of excitement and electricity. At this stage in his career, the trumpeter seemed to be searching for a breakthrough, perhaps on a popular level. This manifests itself with occasional Age of Aquarius vocals and spacy harmonies that appeal to a broad audience. Even the more commercial tracks delight with unconventional characteristics, despite their somewhat compromising nature. There is plenty of the "old" Ellis in full view, however, as the band rocks with its well-known and only half in jest "Beat Me Daddy, Seven to the Bar." Ellis was an emotionally powerful and technically proficient player, something that is sometimes overlooked; his feature on "I Remember Clifford" is a minor tour de force. The trumpeter wrote regularly for his band, but also attracted some outstanding composers, such as Hank Levy and Howlett Smith. While the soloists (other than Ellis, of course) were not always of the caliber of some of the competition, they were at a somewhat disadvantage in that they had to learn to play in strange time signatures -- not an easy task. ~ Steven Loewy

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: May 8, 2001

Genre: Trumpet

Style: Jazz Instrument

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Label Name: Koch Jazz

UPC: 099923859024

Found in: Trumpet

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Shock Treatment

Shock Treatment

Performers Don Ellis

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: May 8, 2001

Genre: Trumpet

Style: Jazz Instrument

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Label Name: Koch Jazz

UPC: 099923859024


Title Track Time
1.New Kind of Country, A --
2.Night City --
3.Homecoming --
4.Mercy Maybe Mercy --
5.Zim --
6.Opus --
7.Star Children --
8.Beat Me Daddy, Seven to the Bar --
9.Milo's Theme --
10.Seven Up --
11.Tihai, The --
12.Zim - (alternate take) --
13.I Remember Clifford --
14.Rasty - (bonus track) --

Editorial Notes

Don Ellis Orchestra: includes: Don Ellis (trumpet); Ron Starr (tenor saxophone, flute, clarinet); Terry Woodson, Dave Sanchez (trombone); Mike Lang (piano, Fender Rhodes piano, clavinet); Ray Neapolitan (sitar, bass); Steve Bohannon (drums); Chino Valdes, Joe Porcaro, Ralph Humphrey (percussion).
Reissue producer: Donald Elfman.
Recorded on Febrary 14 & 15, 1968. Includes liner notes by Digby Diehl and Nick Di Scala.
All tracks have been digitally remastered.
Personnel: Don Ellis (trumpet); Ray Neapolitan (sitar); Ira Schulman (flute, piccolo, clarinet, tenor saxophone); John Magruder (flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, baritone saxophone); Ron Starr (flute, clarinet, saxophone, tenor saxophone); Joe Roccisano (flute, clarinet, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone); Ruben Leon, Joe Lopes (flute, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone); Alan Weight, Edward Warren , Ed Warren, Bob Harmon, Glenn Stuart (trumpet); Terry Woodson (trombone, bass trombone); David Sanchez , Ron Myers, Vince Diaz, David Sanchez (trombone); Michael Lange (piano, electric piano); Mike Lang (piano, Fender Rhodes piano, Clavinet); Mark Cass Stevens, Ralph Humphrey (vibraphone, timbales, percussion); Steve Bohannon (drums); Chino Valdes, Carlos "Patato" Valdes (congas, bongos); Alan Estes (timbales, percussion); Mark Stevens, Joe Porcaro (percussion).
Audio Remasterer: Rosalind Ilett.
Recording information: Hollywood, CA (02/14/1968/02/15/1968).
Don Ellis was such a talented trumpeter, composer, and organizer that everything he recorded as a leader has at least some unusual moments worth exploring. His big bands were characterized by big brassy arrangements, odd meters that somehow always swung, lots of trumpet solos by Ellis, and an often visceral excitement. Although not equal to his best records such as Electric Bath, this late recording of Ellis' band is filled with all these traits, and thus exudes lots of excitement and electricity. At this stage in his career, the trumpeter seemed to be searching for a breakthrough, perhaps on a popular level. This manifests itself with occasional Age of Aquarius vocals and spacy harmonies that appeal to a broad audience. Even the more commercial tracks delight with unconventional characteristics, despite their somewhat compromising nature. There is plenty of the "old" Ellis in full view, however, as the band rocks with its well-known and only half in jest "Beat Me Daddy, Seven to the Bar." Ellis was an emotionally powerful and technically proficient player, something that is sometimes overlooked; his feature on "I Remember Clifford" is a minor tour de force. The trumpeter wrote regularly for his band, but also attracted some outstanding composers, such as Hank Levy and Howlett Smith. While the soloists (other than Ellis, of course) were not always of the caliber of some of the competition, they were at a somewhat disadvantage in that they had to learn to play in strange time signatures -- not an easy task. ~ Steven Loewy
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