• – Top Music –
    • The Singable Songs Collection [Box]
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      No. 1

      The Singable Songs Collection [Box]

      by Raffi

      This massive collection of songs from the world’s favourite children’s songwriter features three discs and a whopping total of 54 songs. The Singable Songs Collection box set gives you favourites like "Baa Baa Black Sheep," "Willoughby Wallaby Woo," "Shake My Sillies Out" and "Les Zombis Et Les Loups-Garous." If you and your kids love the mixed blend of ragtime, country, folk and reggae styles that Raffi offers — all tailored for audiences four to 10-years-old — then this essential compilation will hold a favourite place on your shelf.

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    • Fool's Gold
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    • Turn Blue
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    • Ghost Stories
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    • There's a Hippo in My Tub
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      No. 5

      There's a Hippo in My Tub

      by Anne Murray

      One of Canada's best loved voices brings her talents to the younger set with this endearing collection of songs for children. From traditional children's tunes to kid-friendly jazz and pop standards, Anne Murray puts her heart into every track on this rambunctious collection.

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    • Love Bug
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    • CSNY 1974
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      No. 7

      CSNY 1974

      by CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG

      It was, at the time, one of the highest-grossing rock tours ever, grossing over 11 million dollars in an era when such figures were uncommon. Such success camouflaged the chaos behind the scenes -- the bitter fights and feuds, the excess and indulgence that led to Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young pocketing about a half million dollars each, when all was said and done. Big bucks were the reason the CSNY 1974 tour even existed. Efforts to record a new album in 1973, their first since 1970's breakthrough Déjà Vu, collapsed but manager Elliot Roberts and promoter Bill Graham convinced the group to stage the first outdoor stadium tour in the summer of 1974, with the idea that CSNY would test-drive new material in concert, then record a new studio album in the fall, or maybe release a live record from the historic tour. Neither happened. The group cleaved in two upon the tour's conclusion and the live tapes sat in the vaults until Graham Nash decided to assemble a box set of the tour just in time for its 40th anniversary in 2014. Nash and producer Joel Bernstein -- the driving forces behind the excellent new millennial archival CSN reissues -- culled the best moments from the nine recorded shows, sometimes cobbling together composites, then assembled the whole thing as a three-CD set designed to replicate the mammoth three-hour sets the quartet played in 1974. That very length indicates how there was room on the 1974 tour for every aspect of CSNY, giving space to sensitive folk, woolly electric guitar jams, hits, and unheard songs. Several of those new songs showed up on albums by CSNY in various permutations, while a few -- mostly written by Young -- never got an airing outside of this tour, so the first official release of "Love Art Blues," "Pushed It Over the End," and even the throwaway Nixon jape "Goodbye Dick" is indeed noteworthy. But what makes CSNY 1974 a substantial chapter in their legacy is how it captures the band in full flight just as its moment is starting to slip away. Stills and Young play with the burly force they channeled into Manassas and Crazy Horse, providing a startling contrast to both the sweetness of disc two's acoustic set and Crosby's excursions into the haze of If I Could Only Remember My Name. Hearing the band pull apart as its members come together is simultaneously thrilling and enervating because Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young remain locked in a battle to outdo one another; it's fascinating to hear them spar, but also draining. Nevertheless, that messy competition is why CSNY 1974 is a vital addition to their canon. Tales of CSNY acrimony are legend, but this rancor rarely surfaced on record. Here, those brawling egos are pushed to the forefront, with all the pretty harmonies operating as an accent to the main event. [CSNY 1974 was also released as a CD/DVD.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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    • Led Zeppelin: Celebration Day
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      No. 8

      Led Zeppelin: Celebration Day

      by Led Zeppelin

      Contrary to popular perception, Led Zeppelin isn't exactly averse to reunions. If anything, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant can't keep away from each other. Just four years after John Bonham's 1980 death, Page laid down guitar on Robert Plant's oldies act the Honeydrippers, and not long after that, John Paul Jones joined the pair for a performance at 1985's Live Aid. That set was trashed by the public and band alike, as was their subsequent 1988 appearance at Atlantic Records' 40th Anniversary celebration, but despite these lackluster gigs, rumors of a full-fledged reunion continued to circulate well into the new millennium, even after Page & Plant recorded a pair of albums in the mid-'90s -- a project that caused tension with Jones, who was unaware of the collaboration until its release. Eventually, all the bad blood cooled and the trio once again reunited, this time with Bonham's son Jason on drums, for a full-fledged set as the headliners for the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert. Five years later, this reunion was finally released as Celebration Day, a live album available either as an audio or a CD/DVD set, letting the world at large experience what was roundly and rightly acclaimed as a near-perfect reunion. Why is Celebration Day such a resounding success? The snide answer is rehearsal: Zeppelin knew their previous two returns to the stage weren't up to snuff so they spent a great deal of time woodshedding, realizing their reputation was on the line. And since none of the participants were truly tempted by an ongoing reunion, one where they would have to hawk the same set list at every corner of the globe for over a year, they decided to pour all they had into this one-off concert, betting that one great gig would trump a globe-conquering tour. They were right. Celebration Day is an ideal coda for Led Zeppelin, proof that the group's skills only deepened with age. Never once does the group sound as if they're grasping at re-creating their youth; they've selected a set heavy on blues, atmosphere, and hits, songs that allow each member -- including Jason Bonham -- to stretch out and casually flaunt his skills. Plant may no longer be able to reach the soaring highs he did in the '70s, but his lowered range gives "Black Dog" and "The Song Remains the Same" gravity, and helps give "Trampled Under Foot" a gut-level punch. Page still can muff a note or two -- so can the band, actually, with Plant missing a line on the opening "Good Times Bad Times," a mistake that's thankfully left uncorrected -- but his imagination is unchained, and, when compared to the Page/Plant records of the '90s, it becomes clear how much Jones contributed to the band's chemistry, lending it grit and funk ("Misty Mountain Hop" grooves more than any song without bass should), deepening and coloring Page's riffs, letting the band bounce out and return to center. All of this unique chemistry is evident on Celebration Day -- underscored ever so slightly by the presence of Jason Bonham, the son of the king who now seems like the only possible heir to the throne, emphasizing that the band is a family affair -- and while this reunion is so unexpectedly, impossibly good that you'd want to experience this in the flesh, it also underscores the wisdom of leaving this as a one-time thing. This is so good that this is how you want to remember them: older, perhaps wiser, and still majestic. [A two-CD/DVD Blu-Ray Deluxe Version with 33 tracks was also released, packaged in a jewel case.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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    • Very Best of Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons [Rhino 2002]
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      No. 9

      Very Best of Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons [Rhino 2002]

      by Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons

      Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons: Frankie Valli (vocals); Tommy DeVito (vocals, guitar); Bob Gaudio (vocals, keyboards); Nick Massi (vocals, bass). Additional personnel includes: Joe Long (vocals, guitar, nass); Charlie Calello (bass). Producers include: Bob Crewe, Bob Guadio. Compilation producer: Gary Stewart. Recorded between 1962 & 1978. Includes liner notes by Pat Sierchio. All tracks have been digitally remastered. Released in 2002, this excellent 20-track collection, lovingly compiled by the Rhino label, features many of Frankie Valli's finest moments, both as part of the Four Seasons and on his own. While the majority of the disc focuses on the falsetto-voiced singer's string of 1960s hits with his impeccable Jersey boys that made up the Four Seasons, including the energetic, neo-doo-wopper "Sherry" and the optimistic "Let's Hang On (To What We've Got)," it also makes room for solo singles, such as the dreamy "Can't Take My Eyes Off You" and the funky theme from "Grease."

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    • Vise le Ciel ou Bob Dylan Revisité
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    • X
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      No. 11

      X

      by Ed Sheeran

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    • Jersey Boys: Music From the Motion Picture and Broadway Musical
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    • The Greatest Journey: Essential Collection [Alternate Version]
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      No. 13

      The Greatest Journey: Essential Collection [Alternate Version]

      by CELTIC WOMAN

      Personnel: Des Moore (guitar, bouzouki); Andreja Malir (harp); John O'Brien (tin whistle, pipes); David Downes (keyboards, percussion, background vocals); Eoghan O'Neill (bass guitar); Ray Fean (drums, percussion); Robbie Harris, Andrew Reilly (bodhran); Nick Bailey , Robbie Casserly (percussion); Andrew Boland. Audio Mixer: Andrew Boland. Audio Remasterer: Joe Gastwirt. Ensembles: Aontas Choral Ensemble; The Discovery Gospel Choir; The Irish Film Orchestra. Arranger: David Downes. Celtic Woman, initially a one-shot collaboration by six leading Irish vocalists for a 2004 PBS special, struck a chord of adoration for the Emerald Isle, a fancy affecting both sides of the Atlantic, and swiftly became a permanent collective. THE GREATEST JOURNEY captures many of the best moments of elegant harmonizing by the act, from their serene and rapturous take on Enya's "Orinoco Flow" to the mournful yet poppily uplifting indigenous folk of "You Raise Me Up."

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    • Planet Yoga: Music for Yoga, Meditation and Peace
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      No. 14

      Planet Yoga: Music for Yoga, Meditation and Peace

      by Various Artists

      Includes liner notes by Krishna Das. This two-disc set is divided according to its usefulness to the listener. Disc one is the choice for the yoga part and is perhaps a slightly active version of peace. The booklet even shows a number of hatha yoga poses to try while singing along to a selection of chants that invoke various divinities by repeating their names over and again. Jai Uttal sings to the young cowherd deity Lord Krishna on his fusion-laced "Gopala" and Bhagavan Das praises Ram with a melodic groove, while Dave Stringer offers a quiet prayer to Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed boy who removes obstacles. Both tracks from Krishna Das honor Lord Shiva, one being a previously unreleased, rhythm-based "prayer" to his fierce Rudra incarnation. Two lesser-known artists also make fine contributions -- Wah! and Diana Rogers, both of whom have sung as part of the Krishna Das Kirtan Posse over the years. So you've got all that energy out and now you are ready to meditate or be passively peaceful? Pop in disc two and chill on out. The aural landscape painted by Drala is a bit on the new age side, but calming nonetheless. Benjy Wertheimer and his esraj (a classical Indian string instrument) lay down two pieces based on the alap (a classical Indian musical statement), though the specific ragas are not named. The disc closes with the legendary "Emperor of Melody," Ali Akbar Khan. A master of the sarod who has been performing since 1936, Khan offers "Morning Meditatio," which originally appeared on his 1990 release Journey. ~ Kelly McCartney

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    • Dance
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      No. 15

      Dance

      by Fleetwood Mac

      Fleetwood Mac: Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood, Christine McVie, John McVie, Stevie Nicks. Additional personnel includes: Brett Tuggle (guitar, keyboards, background vocals); Neale Heywood (guitar, background vocals); Lenny Castro (percussion); Sharon Celani, Mindy Stein (background vocals); USC Trojan Marching Band. Producers: Lindsey Buckingham, Elliot Scheiner. Recorded live in Hollywood, California. THE DANCE was nominated for a 1998 Grammy Award for Best Pop Album. "Silver Springs" was nominated for a 1998 Grammy for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. "The Chain" was nominated for a 1998 Grammy for Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. Inasmuch as Fleetwood Mac's classic 1970s albums drew much of their charm from their quirky arrangements and fastidious studio craft, it's a bit odd that the band would choose to reunite with a live, largely unplugged album. But somehow, the first album by the Fleetwood-McVie-McVie-Buckingham-Nicks lineup since 1987's TANGO IN THE NIGHT manages to recapture a good deal of the old feel, which had a lot to do with three very different singer-songwriters agreeing to live together under the umbrella of a single flexible rhythm section. After dispensing with the group effort "The Chain," which leads off this set, the reconstituted Mac spends the rest of the album showing off its separate parts for the distinct elements they are, while mixing a few new songs into a collection of classics. Lindsey Buckingham rips through the late-period hit "Big Love" unaccompanied, compensating for his shrinking vocal range with some blistering guitar picking. Stevie Nicks stretches out "Rhiannon" like one of her flowing dresses, with a piano-ballad opening. Christine McVie, whose alluring, matronly rock voice remains undiminished, offers the lovely new "Temporary One," which, one hopes, doesn't describe this reunion.

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    • Ultraviolence
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      No. 16

      Ultraviolence

      by Lana Del Rey

      The maelstrom of hype surrounding self-modeled Hollywood pop star Lana Del Rey's 2012 breakthrough album, Born to Die, found critics, listeners, and pop culture aficionados divided about her detached, hyper-stylized approach to every aspect of her music and public persona. What managed to get overlooked by many was that Born to Die made such a polarizing impression because it actually offered something that didn't sound like anything else. Del Rey's sultry, overstated orchestral pop recast her as some sort of vaguely imagined chanteuse for a generation raised on Adderall and the Internet, with heavy doses of Twin Peaks atmosphere adding a creepy sheen to intentionally vapid (and undeniably catchy) radio hits. Follow-up album Ultraviolence shifts gears considerably, building a thick, slow-moving atmosphere with its languid songs and opulent arrangements. Gone are the big beats and glossy production that resulted in tracks like "Summertime Sadness." Instead, Ultraviolence begins with the protracted, rolling melancholia of "Cruel World," nearly seven minutes of what feels like a sad, reverb-drenched daydream. The song sets the stage for the rest of the album, which simmers with a haunted, yearning feeling but never boils over. Even the most pop-friendly moments here are steeped in patient, jazz-inflected moodiness, as with the sad-eyed longing of "Shades of Cool" or the unexpected tempo changes that connect the slinky verses of single "West Coast" to their syrupy, swaying choruses. Production from the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach might have something to do with the metered restraint that permeates the album, with songs like "Sad Girl" carrying some of the slow-burning touches of greasy blues-rock Auerbach is known for. A few puzzling moments break up the continuity of the album. The somewhat hooky elements of "Brooklyn Baby" can't quite rise above its disjointed song structure and cringeable lyrics that could be taken either as mockery of the hipster lifestyle or self-parody. "Money Power Glory" steps briefly out of the overall dreamscape of the album, sounding like a tossed-off outtake from the Born to Die sessions. Despite these mild missteps, Ultraviolence thrives for the most part in its density, meant clearly to be absorbed as an entire experience, with even its weaker pieces contributing to a mood that's consumptive, sexy, and as eerie as big-budget pop music gets. Del Rey's loudest detractors criticized her music as a hollow, cliché-ridden product designed by the music industry and lacking the type of substance that makes real pop stars pop. Ultraviolence asserts that as a songwriter, she has complete control of her craft, deciding on songs far less flashy or immediate but still uniquely captivating. As these songs shift her sound into more mature and nuanced places, it becomes clear that every deadpan affectation, lispy lyric, and overblown allusion to desperate living has been a knowing move in the creation of the strange, beguiling character -- and sonic experience -- we know as Lana Del Rey. [A Deluxe Edition added a bonus track.] ~ Fred Thomas

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    • Illuminations [11/15]
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      No. 17

      Illuminations [11/15]

      by Josh Groban

      Audio Mixer: Allen Sides. Recording information: Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA; Punkerpad West, Los Angeles, CA; Shangri La Studio, Malibu, CA; Sound City Studios, Van Nuys, CA; Sunset Sound Studio, Los Angeles, CA; The Boat, Los Angeles, CA. Photographer: Kurt Iswarienko. Josh Groban's fifth studio album, 2010's Illuminations, finds the vocalist working with songs informed as much by American roots music as by the classical crossover sound he helped popularize. Featuring production from famed producer Rick Rubin (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Johnny Cash, Metallica), the album includes many Groban originals, some of which were co-written with former Semisonic frontman and Dixie Chicks collaborator Dan Wilson. Also lending their talents here are such luminaries as guitarist Smokey Hormel, organist Spooner Oldham, arrangers David Campbell and James Newton Howard, Brazilian star Carlinhos Brown, and others.

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    • Frozen [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]
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    • Lunatic
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    • 1975
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      No. 20

      1975

      by The 1975

      The 2013 self-titled debut album from the 1975 is a superb album that finds the Manchester outfit poised on the brink of stardom. When rock guitars meet dancefloor synths, '80s influences become hard to deny, but while the 1975 definitely have a retro vibe (hence the name), the alchemy of how they bring those influences to bear is totally contemporary. While many of the tracks here bring to mind such icons as Peter Gabriel, INXS, and U2, they also fit nicely next to artists of the same moment, like Passion Pit, Temper Trap, and M83. It helps that lead singer/songwriter Matthew Healy has a compelling tenor croon that can soar like Bono one minute and coo like Lionel Richie the next. There is also a sophistication to the band's songs, and an instinct to blur genre lines that makes it hard to box them into one, easy to define sound. In that sense, the band also recalls the way Fall Out Boy combined the rhythmic phrasing and melodies of contemporary R&B with their own brand of driving, guitar-based emo-rock. Much has been made of the 1975's avowed love of '80s John Hughes movies, and many of the cuts here, like the thrilling, lovesick "Settle Down" and the sparkling "Girls," play with such great narrative momentum that they sound like songs culled from a Hughes soundtrack. Meanwhile, cuts like "The City," "Chocolate," and "Sex" drive and climb like the best anthemic '80s stadium rock, roiling a host of influences into a single distinct sound that, the moment it hits your ears, becomes timeless. ~ Matt Collar

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    • Singable Songs for the Very Young
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      No. 21

      Singable Songs for the Very Young

      by Raffi

      Beloved and award-winning children’s troubadour Raffi has captivated the young and young-at-heart alike since this very first album release in 1976. Singable Songs For the Very Young features loads of toe-tapping, sing-along favourites like "Down By the Bay," "Spider On the Floor" and "Five Little Frogs," hits guaranteed to have you and your four to 10-year-olds clapping to the upbeat rhythms. Raffi’s reggae, ragtime, gospel, jazz and country inspired tunes have captured the hearts and minds of children everywhere, and this album will show you why.

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    • Baby Beluga
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      No. 22

      Baby Beluga

      by Raffi

      Part reggae, part ragtime, part folk and all fun, Raffi has consistently pleased his young fans since his first album release in the late ’70s. With Baby Beluga , Raffi brings his audience to new levels of squealing, clapping delight pleasing the crowd with favourites like the title track, "Oats and Beans and Barley" and "To Everyone In All the World." If your youngsters love to learn, sing and have fun all at the same time, then this wonderful 1980 release is a must-own.

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    • Come Fly with Me
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      No. 23

      Come Fly with Me

      by Frank Sinatra

      The 1998 reissue of COME FLY WITH ME includes three extra songs not included on the original release; "Chicago," "South Of The Border" and "I Love Paris." Personnel includes: Frank Sinatra (vocals); Billy May, Nelson Riddle (conductor, arranger). Recorded in April 1953, October 1957 and April 1960. Includes liner notes by Pete Welding. All tracks have been digitally remastered using 20-bit technology. Save yourself several thousand dollars in airfare by checking out this swinging travelogue. COME FLY WITH ME finds Sinatra working for the first time with Billy May, whose bold, jazzy arrangements were a breath of fresh air following the stale, oafish orchestrations of Alex Stordahl. Together, Sinatra and May produced some of the most upbeat, joyful albums of the singer's career. In the tradition of Sinatra's other great '50s theme albums, COME FLY WITH ME takes you from "The Isle Of Capri" to "Blue Hawaii" with stops all over the world in between, each one equally memorable. Miles from the despondent loner of WHERE ARE YOU and ONLY THE LONELY, Sinatra's mood here is vibrant and lustrous, as he dances in and around May's arrangements. It doesn't hurt that May has a special gift for ballsy horn arrangements, as evidenced on the title cut and the Sinatra classic "Chicago."

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    • Little Secret
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    • Nighty Night World
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      No. 25

      Nighty Night World

      by Precious Planet

      Personnel: Rob Piltch (guitar); Louie Papachristos (flute). Audio Mixer: George Seara. Recording information: Phase One Studios, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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    • Lazaretto
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    • Bare Trees
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      No. 27

      Bare Trees

      by Fleetwood Mac

      Fleetwood Mac: Danny Kirwin (guitar, vocals); Christine McVie (keyboards, vocals); Bob Welch (guitar, vocals); John McVie (bass); Mick Fleetwood (drums). Fleetwood Mac's massive pop success often overshadows the group's origins as one of the premier English blues bands of the sixties. Mac's 1972 album, BARE TREES, found the group searching for a new direction, having lost both of their stellar lead guitarists--Peter Green and Jeremy Spencer--to the excesses of the '60s rock lifestyle. Joined by new guitarist/vocalist Bob Welch and bassist John McVie's wife Christine on keyboards and vocals, Fleetwood Mac reinvented itself as a more pop-oriented rock band. The real star of BARE TREES is guitarist/vocalist Danny Kirwan, who contributes the gorgeous guitar instrumental "Sunny Side of Heaven" and "Bare Trees," a funky rocker that was a massive FM radio staple throughout the seventies. It was new guitarist Bob Welch, however, who wrote and sang the modest hit "Sentimental Lady," a haunting, romantic ballad that remains one of Fleetwood Mac's finest moments. Christime McVie's "Spare Me A Little Of Your Love" hints at Fleetwood Mac's future direction. BARE TREES is a rewarding, well-crafted album that stands on its own merits rather than the Fleetwood Mac legend.

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    • Complete Album Collection, Vol. 1
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    • Definitive Collection Mini LP [Box]
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      No. 29

      Definitive Collection Mini LP [Box]

      by LED ZEPPELIN

      Issued by the esteemed Rhino label in late 2008 to coincide with Led Zeppelin's 40th anniversary, the 12-CD DEFINITIVE COLLECTION box set presents all 10 albums by the legendary British rock band in small LP-replica form. While the glorious music here remains the same--from LED ZEPPELIN's "Good Times, Bad Times" to CODA's "Wearing and Tearing"-- it's the packaging that offers something different, with every CD bearing a scaled-down version of the original U.K. record designs. Primarily geared towards the diehard Led Zep fan, this anthology also works nicely for any brave soul willing to jump in and take on these rock classics all at once. Since even the weakest Zep material is better than what most other groups have to offer, anyone adding this mini-monolith to their collection really can't go wrong.

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    • Complete Columbia Album Collection 1972-1988
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    • Sir Colin Davis: The Complete RCA Legacy
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    • Complete RCA and Sony Album Collection
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    • Giulini in Vienna
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    • Carlo Maria Giulini: The Complete Sony Recordings
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    • Philippe Entremont: The Complete Piano C
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    • Wagner: Tristan und Isolde
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    • 100,000,000 Bon Jovi Fans Can't Be Wrong... The Premiere Collection
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      No. 37

      100,000,000 Bon Jovi Fans Can't Be Wrong... The Premiere Collection

      by Bon Jovi

      Full title: 100,000,000 Bon Jovi Fans Can't Be Wrong... This release includes a bonus DVD. Bon Jovi: Richie Sambora, Jon Bon Jovi (vocals, guitar); Hugh McDonald (bass guitar); Tico Torres (drums); Alec John Such. Additional personnel include: Dave Stewart, Eric Bazilian, Garo Yellin, Jerry Cohen, Joe Perry, Kenny Aronoff, Lance Quinn, Mark Hudson, Pino Palladino, Shawn Pelton, Kurt Johnston, Rick Valenti, Jeff Kazee, Carol Brooks, Bobby Bandiera. Producers: Pat Leonard; Andy Johns; Jon Bon Jovi; Richie Sambora Compilation Producer: Obie O'Brien. Liner Note Authors: Pierre Robert; Jon Bon Jovi.

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    • Passion Play
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      No. 38

      Passion Play

      by JETHRO TULL

      Jethro Tull's second album-length composition, A Passion Play is very different from -- and not quite as successful as -- Thick as a Brick. Ian Anderson utilizes reams of biblical (and biblical-sounding) references, interwoven with modern language, as a sort of a rock equivalent to T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland. As with most progressive rock, the words seem important and profound, but their meaning is anyone's guess ("The ice-cream lady wet her drawers, to see you in the Passion Play..."), with Anderson as a dour but engaging singer/sage (who, at least at one point, seems to take on the role of a fallen angel). It helps to be aware of the framing story, about a newly deceased man called to review his life at the portals of heaven, who realizes that life on Earth is preferable to eternity in paradise. But the music puts it over successfully, a dazzling mix of old English folk and classical material, reshaped in electric rock terms. The band is at its peak form, sustaining the tension and anticipation of this album-length piece across 45 minutes, although the music runs out of inspiration about five minutes before it actually ends. [A Steven Wilson Stereo Mix of the album was released in 2014.] ~ Bruce Eder

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    • Byron Janis: The Complete RCA Album Collection
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    • Complete Hits Collection 1973-1997
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    • Complete Cole Porter Songbooks
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      No. 41

      Complete Cole Porter Songbooks

      by Various Artists

      The greatest justice you can do when interpreting someone else’s song is to do it well. With talent like Mel Torme, Dizzy Gillespie and Dinah Washington on hand, you don’t have much to worry about. The Complete Cole Porter Box Set is an album of interpretations of musician/lyricist’s work, with each artist offering a different take on a Cole Porter classic. Fred Astaire turns in a spirited performance of “Night and Day”, while Ella Fitzgerald is mesmerizing on the sultry “I’ve Got You Under My Skin.” Porter purists beware – the interpretations aren’t always true to the original – but are interestingly performed by some of jazz’s biggest names.

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    • Beethoven: Complete Piano Sonatas (CD-ROM)
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    • Nomad Series
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    • One More from the Road
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      No. 44

      One More from the Road

      by Lynyrd Skynyrd

      Few concert albums defined their genre more aptly than One More From the Road. If Southern rock was about integrity fuelled by pride, then Lynyrd Skynyrd was definitely in the right place at the right time -- two days after the American Bicentennial in Atlanta, GA. This deluxe edition commemorates the album's 25th anniversary by augmenting the original 14-track release with ten additional performances taken from the July 7-9, 1976, shows at the fabulous Fox Theater. By the time that Lynyrd Skynyrd hit the road to support Gimmie Back My Bullets, their fan base had mushroomed out of their distinctly Southeastern home turf. With the support of national FM radio coverage as well as opening slots on tours with the Who, Skynyrd brought it all back home to the place they were discovered (by Al Kooper, who signed the band to his Sounds of the South subsidiary record label in 1971). Live Lynyrd Skynyrd performances circa the Gimmie Back My Bullets tour contained a sampling from each of their long-players, as well as some kick-ass covers -- such as "T for Texas" and "Crossroads" -- in addition to "Travellin' Man," a new composition worked up specifically for this tour. Indicating some degree of performance alteration for these shows and the subsequent recordings is the inclusion of a perfunctory "Tuesday's Gone" -- which was done at the beset of the set's producer, Tom Dowd. His uncanny and legendary instincts pay off, as the strength and conviction of that performance places the track literally as well as figuratively at the center of this release. One of the most notable and distinguishing improvements unique to this edition of One More From the Road is all-encompassing sound, which was remastered top to bottom from the original 16-track tapes. As revealed in the 28-page full-color liner-notes essay, these tapes had to undergo a series of processes to physically stabilize the tape long enough to be transferred into the digital domain. The results are astounding, making this deluxe edition more or less a final statement. ~ Lindsay Planer

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    • John Ogdon - The Complete Rca Albumcolle
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    • Vinyl Cafe: The Family Pack
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    • Texas Troubadour [Snapper Long Box]
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      No. 47

      Texas Troubadour [Snapper Long Box]

      by Townes Van Zandt

      Texas Troubadour is a four-disc box set that packages the late songwriter Townes Van Zandt's first seven studio albums for the Poppy and Tomato labels: For the Sake of the Song (1968); Our Mother the Mountain (1969); Townes Van Zandt (1970); Delta Momma Blues (1971); High, Low and In Between (1972); The Late Great Townes Van Zandt (1972), and Flyin' Shoes (1978). In addition, there are four studio outtakes from 1972-73 and a decent portion of Live at the Old Quarter, Houston issued in 1973. Charly reproduces the original cover art in miniature, two covers to each CD. Sound is the same as on the original CD issues, so fans who already own these albums will not be served by purchasing them again in this format. Musically, the work is superb, and since many of Van Zandt's recordings are out of print, this is a fine argument for getting them altogether. Another plus is Adam Komorowski's extensive biographical essay included in the 36-page color booklet that's loaded with photos. ~ Thom Jurek

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    • Swing Guitar Masterpieces 1937-1957
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      No. 48

      Swing Guitar Masterpieces 1937-1957

      by Oscar Alemán

      All tracks have been digitally mastered using HDCD technology.

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    • Best of Linda Ronstadt: The Capitol Years
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      No. 49

      Best of Linda Ronstadt: The Capitol Years

      by Linda Ronstadt

      Personnel include: Linda Ronstadt (vocals). Producers: Chip Douglas; Elliot Mazer; John Boylan; Peter Asher Compilation Producer: Cheryl Pawelski.

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    • 20/20 Experience: The Complete Experience
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