A Single Shard

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A Single Shard

by Linda Sue Park

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt | January 10, 2011 | Trade Paperback

A Single Shard is rated 3 out of 5 by 1.

In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch''ulp''o, a potters'' village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter''s craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday. When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated - until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Min''s irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself - even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Min''s work in the hope of a royal commission . . . even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 176 pages, 7.63 × 5.13 × 0.38 in

Published: January 10, 2011

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547534264

ISBN - 13: 9780547534268

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from I Expected More An orphan boy in 12th century Korea lives under the bridge with a crippled man. He is fascinated with the pottery made by the craftsman in the nearby pottery village. He is taken on as an apprentice and his life slowly changes. This was a good book, a nice pleasant read but I guess I expected something more from a Newbery winner. I enjoy pretty much anything written about ancient Asia and this did give a wonderful portrayal of Korean life at the time.
Date published: 2007-11-25

– More About This Product –

A Single Shard

by Linda Sue Park

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 176 pages, 7.63 × 5.13 × 0.38 in

Published: January 10, 2011

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547534264

ISBN - 13: 9780547534268

About the Book

Tree-ear is fascinated by the celedon ware created in the village of Ch'ulp'o. He is determined to prove himself to the master potter, Min--even if it means making a solitary journey to present Min's work in the hope of a royal commission . . . or arriving at the royal court with nothing but a single celadon shard.

Read from the Book

Chapter 1 "Eh, Tree-ear! Have you hungered well today?" Crane-man called out as Tree-ear drew near the bridge. The well-fed of the village greeted each other politely by saying, "Have you eaten well today?" Tree-ear and his friend turned the greeting inside out for their own little joke. Tree-ear squeezed the bulging pouch that he wore at his waist. He had meant to hold back the good news, but the excitement spilled out of him. "Crane-man! A good thing that you greeted me so just now, for later today we will have to use the proper words!" He held the bag high. Tree-ear was delighted when Crane-man''s eyes widened in surprise. He knew that Crane-man would guess at once-only one thing could give a bag that kind of smooth fullness. Not carrot-tops or chicken bones, which protruded in odd lumps. No, the bag was filled with rice. Crane-man raised his walking crutch in a salute. "Come, my young friend! Tell me how you came by such a fortune-a tale worth hearing, no doubt!" Tree-ear had been trotting along the road on his early-morning perusal of the village rubbish heaps. Ahead of him a man carried a heavy load on a jiggeh, an open-framed backpack made of branches. On the jiggeh was a large woven-straw container, the kind commonly used to carry rice. Tree-ear knew that the rice must be from last year''s crop; in the fields surrounding the village this season''s rice had only just begun to grow. It would be many months before the rice was harvested and the poor allowed to glean the
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From the Publisher

In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch''ulp''o, a potters'' village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter''s craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday. When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated - until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Min''s irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself - even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Min''s work in the hope of a royal commission . . . even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

About the Author

Linda Sue Park is the author of the Newbery Medal book A Single Shard, many other novels, several picture books, and most recently a book of poetry: Tap Dancing on the Roof: Sijo (Poems). She lives in Rochester, New York, with her family, and is now a devoted fan of the New York Mets. For more infromation visit www.lspark.com.

Linda Sue Park is the author of the Newbery Medal book A Single Shard, many other novels, and several picture books. She lives in Rochester, New York, with her family. For more information visit www.lspark.com.

Editorial Reviews

Park (Seesaw Girl) molds a moving tribute to perseverance and creativity in this finely etched novel set in mid-to-late 12th century Korea. . . Readers will not soon forget these characters or their sacrifices. -Publishers Weekly, Starred "Intrigues, danger and the same strong focus on doing what is right turn a simple story into a compelling read. . . Tree-ear''s story conveys a time and place far away and long ago, but with a simplicity and immediacy that is both graceful and unpretentious. A timeless jewel." -Kirkus Reviews with Pointers Like Park''s Seesaw Girl and the Kite Fighters, this book not only gives readers insight an unfamilar time and place, but it is also a great story. -School Library Journal, Starred This quiet, but involving story draws readers into a very different time and place. Though the society has its own conventions, the hearts and minds and stomachs of the characters are not so far removed from those of people today. Readers will feel the hunger and cold that Tree-ear experiences, as well as his shame, fear, gratitude, and love. A well-crafted novel with an unusual setting. -Booklist, ALA, Starred Review Park''s story is alive with fascinating information about life and art in ancient Korea. -Horn Book Guide A broken piece of pottery sets events in motion as an orphan struggles to pay off his debt to a master potter. This finely crafted novel brings 12th-century Korea and these indelible characters to life. -SLJ Best Books of the Year Children''s B
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