Blubber

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Blubber

by Judy Blume

Random House Children's Books | August 1, 1986 | Trade Paperback

Blubber is rated 4.8571 out of 5 by 7.
Blubber is a good name for her, the note from Wendy says about Linda. Jill crumples it up and leaves it on the corner of her desk. She doesn''t want to think about Linda or her dumb report on the whale just now. Jill wants to think about Halloween.

But Robby grabs the note, and before Linda stops talking it has gone halfway around the room.

That''s where it all starts. There''s something about Linda that makes a lot of kids in her fifth-grade class want to see how far they can go -- but nobody, least of all Jill, expects the fun to end where it does.

A New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 160 pages, 7.64 × 5.34 × 0.39 in

Published: August 1, 1986

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0440407079

ISBN - 13: 9780440407072

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Bullying Blubber So this year I discovered Judy Blume with Are you there God? It’s me Margaret. Yes, I know, only decades after the rest of the world. With this realization I finally moved onto conquering more of her book list, and my next choice was another famous one, Blubber. And yet again, I am in love with Judy Blume. Blubber is about a chubby girl in grade five who one day for class does a presentation on whales. That innocent choice makes it easy for the class bully, a horrible girl named Wendy, to nickname her Blubber and to mark her out for torment. This bullying, awful treatment, is dehumanizing, disgusting, and depraved. Blubber, whose real name is Linda, has done nothing to deserve this, but Wendy and her posse make this terrible treatment a natural everyday occurrence. All this constantly building tension pops into a surprising game change, one with far reaching repercussions, and several valuable life lessons. One of the most fascinating aspects that Judy Blume incorporates into Blubber is the point of view. Is this told from the bully’s perspective? Offering us insight into why someone would do this? No. Is it told from the victim’s outlook? Giving us a breakdown of what she is suffering? No. Blubber comes from the view of one of the bully’s enablers, a girl named Jill. She is scared of Wendy, but hates to admit it, so she goes along with all the vile things that happen. She justifies it all with warped logic and unjustified conclusions that blame Blubber for so much. Blume shows us how the bystanders let these injustices go on and on by providing us Jill. She is described as a hard person to get along with right from the start, and as becomes clear throughout the book, hides her fears very well. Jill is shown to suffer from an inferiority complex, both of her parents are white collar professionals in high intellect positions, while she hates the fact her math skills are sorely lacking. This feeling of inadequacy causes Jill to create a tough exterior, a fact even her mother and best friend comments on, but that she tries to ignore. When the final chapters slam through, Jill is at the center of it all and finds herself ill equipped to handle all that is occurring. Blume provides a very rich open tapestry with a past and a future with Blubber. Life will go on, and we all wish we could pop back into this classroom again. Just to make sure Blubber and Jill are okay.
Date published: 2013-10-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A realistic look at bullying and peer pressure Kids can be cruel. It's a cliche, but it most certainly has some truth behind it. And no author better portrayed the mentality behind bullying better than Judy Blume did in "Blubber." The protaganist of "Blubber", Jill, is just an average girl who joins her class in the persecution of an overweight girl, Linda. She goes along with this persecution because she wants to fit in with her classmates and because of the sheer "fun" of it. It's real life, and anyone who has experienced Junior High School will recognize this vicious cycle of bullies, follow-the-leaders, and victims. This is not a sitcom. There is no contrived happy ending or clear-cut victory for anyone. Linda is not a particularly likeable character. The ringleader of the bullies, Wendy, never gets her comeuppence. It's real life. Bullies get away with being creeps, and not every victim is a wonderful person. "Blubber" is a disturbing, but honest book.
Date published: 2009-08-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Blubba! I think this story is very well written! Wendy is so cruel!!!! I can't belive that she can make everyone do as she asks! Like the part when she made linda show her underwear to all the boys, making her eat the bug, making linda kiss a boy, and making her say cruel things! iF I were teased like that I'll be a brick wall just like Jill!! Yea!!! I love this booK!!!
Date published: 2005-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Blubber I think that this is a great book ! It’s about a girl called Linda who gets bullied by most of her classmates. Wendy is the one who started this whole thing! Then the whole class starts to bully another girl called Jill Brenner, who just lets the fun end where it does!
Date published: 2005-10-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great! A nother great one from Judy Blume! A must read!
Date published: 2003-05-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Blubber: The Preview Looking different is a problem for Linda, all because she is fat and did a report on the whale. Most of the kids in her class think Blubber is a good name for her. Jill, one of the common teasers doesn't even expect it to end the way it does. It is a good book to help stop teasing and I encourge you to by it.
Date published: 2000-08-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Blubber rules Just because you look different doesn't mean others have the right to pick on you -- this is the great moral to come out of another stellar novel by Judy Blume. This should be required reading for today's school children.
Date published: 2000-08-16

– More About This Product –

Blubber

by Judy Blume

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 160 pages, 7.64 × 5.34 × 0.39 in

Published: August 1, 1986

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0440407079

ISBN - 13: 9780440407072

From the Publisher

Blubber is a good name for her, the note from Wendy says about Linda. Jill crumples it up and leaves it on the corner of her desk. She doesn''t want to think about Linda or her dumb report on the whale just now. Jill wants to think about Halloween.

But Robby grabs the note, and before Linda stops talking it has gone halfway around the room.

That''s where it all starts. There''s something about Linda that makes a lot of kids in her fifth-grade class want to see how far they can go -- but nobody, least of all Jill, expects the fun to end where it does.

A New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year

From the Jacket

"Blubber is a good name for her, the note from Wendy says about Linda. Jill crumples it up and leaves it on the corner of her desk. She doesn''t want to think about Linda or her dumb report on the whale just now. Jill wants to think about Halloween.
But Robby grabs the note, and before Linda stops talking it has gone halfway around the room.
That''s where it all starts. There''s something about Linda that makes a lot of kids in her fifth-grade class want to see how far they can go -- but nobody, least of all Jill, expects the fun to end where it does.
A "New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year

About the Author

Judy Blume is known and loved by millions of readers for her funny, honest, always believable stories. Among her hugely popular books are Superfudge, Fudge-a-mania, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, and Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great, all available in Dell Yearling editions. Judy Blume lives in New York City.

From Our Editors

Jill goes along with the rest of the fifth-grade class in tormenting a classmate and then finds out what it's like when she, too, becomes a target.

Bookclub Guide

BULLYING: A GUIDE
Macaroni Boy by Katherine Ayres
Blubber by Judy Blume
Spider Boy by Ralph Fletcher
True Blue by Jeffrey Lee
Feather Boy by Nick Springer


The books in this guide all deal with bullying. Use the questions to open discussion with your students on this important topic. Additional themes include challenges, friendships growing up, peer pressure, and self-discovery.

ABOUT BULLYING
Bullying isn’t a new problem in schools. Almost all adults will say that they either encountered or knew a bully in their childhood. Some will say they were victimized, and others will admit to being innocent bystanders. And, some may even reveal that they were bullies themselves.
No one wants to be called names or teased and taunted. No one wants to be left out of a ballgame or a school activity. No one wants their personal belongings ruined or their secrets revealed. New kids in school, and children who are different, especially mentally and physically challenged kids, are often the targets. These kids are already on the outside, and therefore vulnerable. Bullies are seeking attention and want to feel important. They feed their low self-esteem by being mean to others.
Newspapers, magazines, television and radio news are filled with incidents of schoolyard bullying. Why has bullying become such a worldwide issue in schools today? Is bullying the beginning of school violence? Whatever the reasons, schools and parents must develop ways of helping children cope with the local school bully. Children who are being bullied are often quiet about it. The bully may have threatened them if they “tattle” or they may feel embarrassed.

HOW TO RESPOND
Observant adults will notice if a child is quieter than usual, suddenly afraid of going to school, shows a drop in grades, and doesn’t want to play with friends or participate in after school activities. Ask questions. Engage them in conversation about the way they are feeling. Role-play a hypothetical incident. Encourage them to talk with someone they trust. Suggest they write about their feelings in a journal. Give them books to read.

US

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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