Fairy And Folk Tales Of The Irish Peasantry

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Fairy And Folk Tales Of The Irish Peasantry

Editor William Butler Yeats

Dover Publications | November 24, 2011 | Trade Paperback

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Treasury of 64 tales invites readers into the shadowy, twilight world of Celtic myth and legend. Mischievous fairy people, murderous giants, priests, devils, and druids star in such stories as "The Soul Cages," "The Black Lamb," "The Horned Women," "The Phantom Isle," and more. Introduction, Notes by W. B. Yeats.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 8.5 × 5.38 × 0.66 in

Published: November 24, 2011

Publisher: Dover Publications

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0486269418

ISBN - 13: 9780486269412

Found in: Fairy Tales, Fairy Tales
Appropriate for ages: 3 - 5

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– More About This Product –

Fairy And Folk Tales Of The Irish Peasantry

Editor William Butler Yeats

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 8.5 × 5.38 × 0.66 in

Published: November 24, 2011

Publisher: Dover Publications

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0486269418

ISBN - 13: 9780486269412

About the Book

Treasury of 64 tales from the twilight world of Celtic myth and legend: "The Soul Cages," "The Kildare Pooka," "King O'Toole and his Goose," many more. Introduction and Notes by W. B. Yeats.

From the Publisher

Treasury of 64 tales invites readers into the shadowy, twilight world of Celtic myth and legend. Mischievous fairy people, murderous giants, priests, devils, and druids star in such stories as "The Soul Cages," "The Black Lamb," "The Horned Women," "The Phantom Isle," and more. Introduction, Notes by W. B. Yeats.

About the Author

In his 1940 memorial lecture in Dublin, T. S. Eliot pronounced Yeats "one of those few whose history is the history of their own time, who are a part of the consciousness of an age which cannot be understood without them." Modern readers have increasingly agreed, and some now view Yeats even more than Eliot as the greatest modern poet in our language. Son of the painter John Butler Yeats, the poet divided his early years among Dublin, London, and the port of Sligo in western Ireland. Sligo furnished many of the familiar places in his poetry, among them the mountain Ben Bulben and the lake isle of Innisfree. Important influences on his early adulthood included his father, the writer and artist William Morris, the nationalist leader John O'Leary, and the occultist Madame Blavatsky. In 1889 he met the beautiful actress and Irish nationalist Maud Gonne; his long and frustrated love for her (she refused to marry him) would inspire some of his best work. Often and mistakenly viewed as merely a dreamy Celtic twilight, Yeats's work in the 1890s involved a complex attempt to unite his poetic, nationalist, and occult interests in line with his desire to "hammer [his] thoughts into unity." By the turn of the century, Yeats was immersed in the work with the Irish dramatic movement that would culminate in the founding of the Abbey Theatre in 1904 as a national theater for Ireland. Partly as a result of his theatrical experience, his poetry after 1900 began a complex "movement downwards up
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Appropriate for ages: 3 - 5

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