Iqbal

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Iqbal

by Francesco D'Adamo
Translated by Ann Leonori

Aladdin | July 1, 2005 | Trade Paperback

Iqbal is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 4.
When young Iqbal is sold into slavery at a carpet factory, his arrival changes everything for the other overworked and abused chidren there. It is Iqbal who explains to them that despite their master''s promises, he plans on keeping them as his slaves indefinetely. But it is also Iqbal who inspires the other children to look to a future free from toil...and is brave enough to show them how to get there.
This moving fictionalized account of the real Iqbal Masih is told through the voice of Fatima, a young Pakistani girl whose life is changed by Iqbal''s courage.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 128 pages, 7.62 × 5.12 × 0.5 in

Published: July 1, 2005

Publisher: Aladdin

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1416903291

ISBN - 13: 9781416903291

Appropriate for ages: 8

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from AMAZING LIFE OF STORY OF IQBAL AMAZING LIFE OF STORY OF IQBAL The book is about a young boy named Iqbal Masih who lived in Pakistan and got sold into slavery because his father could not pay off a debt. Iqbal got sold to a carpet factory, earned less than two rupees a day, was not fed properly and got blisters on his hands from making carpets all day. Francesco D'adamo tells us how he lived in the carpet factory, how he escaped and how he died. Francesco doesn't tell the story from the point of Iqbal he it’s from the point of view of a fictional character named Fatima who works in the carpet factory and is close friends with Iqbal. The book is a historical fiction mainly because Fatima didn’t exist. The book is both sad and happy. Iqbal is a great book, a short read though. I think this book is best for kids ages ten to fourteen. Iqbal was an amazing person. Some things I liked in the book were the characters because they were just like how real kids in a carpet factory would have been. The characters also had good personalities like Fatima who always had hope and no one could bring her down. A character called Karim was a good character because there wouldn’t be much of a problem without him, he would always tell the master Hussain Khan whatever the kids were doing if they were doing something bad. It was really easy to visualize what was happening in “Iqbal.” It was a really good book and It should have been a little bit longer because it was very interesting. Iqbal was a real person and inspired lots of people, sadly the Carpet Mafia killed him in 1995 when he was thirteen years old. (The Carpet Mafia is a gang that kills anyone who opposes sending people to carpet factories if their parents can’t pay off their debt.) Iqbal helped free many child slaves. I encourage people that like to read short books and want to do something about child slavery to read this book. If anyone who wants to get inspired to do something than this is a good book for people that want to do somrthing about child slavery. There are still kids working in carpet factories and brick factories - you name it, so read “Iqbal” to learn more. 18 hours ago
Date published: 2010-03-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from “IQBAL” REVIEW BY ROSS bb Target audience: boys and girls ages 11-14 and want to read the book Purpose: To let people know if the fictional biography is good or not Tone: journalistic Rating: * * * * This book review is about the book “Iqbal” by Francesco D’Adamo. The book is about a young boy named Iqbal Masih who lived in Pakistan who got sold into slavery because his father could not pay off a debt. Iqbal got sold to a carpet factory, earned less than two rupees a day, was not fed properly and got blisters on his hands from making carpets all day. The book tells us how he lived in the carpet factory, how he escaped and how he died. The book isn’t told from the point of view of Iqbal, it’s from the point of view of a fictional character named Fatima who works in the carpet factory and is close friends with Iqbal. The book is a historical fiction mainly because Fatima didn’t exist. The book is both sad and happy. Iqbal is a great book, a short read though. I think this book is best for kids ages ten to fourteen. Iqbal was an amazing person. Some things I liked in the book were the characters because they were just like how real kids in a carpet factory would have been. The characters also had good personalities like Fatima who always had hope and no one could bring her down. A character called Karim was a good character because there wouldn’t be much of a problem without him, he would always tell the master Hussain Khan whatever the kids were doing if they were doing something bad. It was really easy to visualize what was happening in “Iqbal.” A thing I didn’t like about the book was that it was very short it only took me three days to read. It was a really good book and I wanted it to be a little bit longer because it was very interesting. Iqbal was a real person and inspired lots of people, sadly the Carpet Mafia killed him in 1995 when he was thirteen years old. The Carpet Mafia is a gang that kills anyone who opposes sending people to carpet factories if their parents can’t pay off their debt. Iqbal helped free many child slaves. I encourage people that like to read short books and want to do something about child slavery to read this book. If you want to get inspired to do something than this is a good book for you. There are still kids working in carpet factories and brick factories - you name it, so read “Iqbal” to learn more.
Date published: 2010-03-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING this book MUST win an award. it is just amzing! keeps you on the edge with every chapter! if you havn't read this book yet then you definatly should
Date published: 2006-11-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from “Absolutely Great!” This book was one of the best books Ive ever read in my entire life, should get a Newbery award.
Date published: 2006-04-09

– More About This Product –

Iqbal

by Francesco D'Adamo
Translated by Ann Leonori

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 128 pages, 7.62 × 5.12 × 0.5 in

Published: July 1, 2005

Publisher: Aladdin

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1416903291

ISBN - 13: 9781416903291

About the Book

When young Iqbal is sold into slavery at a carpet factory, his arrival changes everything for the other overworked and abused chidren there. It is Iqbal who explains to them that despite their master's promises, he plans on keeping them as his slaves indefinetely. But it is also Iqbal who inspires the other children to look to a future free from toil...and is brave enough to show them how to get there.

This moving fictionalized account of the real Iqbal Masih is told through the voice of Fatima, a young Pakistani girl whose life is changed by Iqbal's courage.

Read from the Book

One "Yes, I knew Iqbal. I think about him often. I like to. I feel I owe it to him. You see, for Iqbal I was not invisible. I existed, and he made me free. So here is his story. As I remember it. As I knew him." The house of our master, Hussain Khan, was in the outskirts of Lahore, not far from the dusty, dry countryside where flocks of sheep from the north grazed. It was a big house, half stone, half sheet iron, facing a dirty courtyard containing a well, an old Toyota van, and a canopy of reeds that protected the bales of cotton and wool. Across the courtyard from the house was a long building, the carpet factory, where fourteen of us worked. We had all been bonded to Hussain Khan to pay off debts our families had contracted with local moneylenders. The building had a tin roof and a dirt floor, so it was hot in the summer and cold in the winter. In the corner at the back of the courtyard, half-hidden by thorn bushes and weeds, you could just see a rusty iron door. Behind the door was a short, steep stairway that led down to the Tomb. Work began half an hour before dawn, when the master''s wife, dressed in her bathrobe and slippers, crossed the courtyard in the uncertain light of the fading night and brought us a round loaf of chapati bread and some dal, lentil soup. We all ate together, greedily dipping our bread into the large bowl on the ground, while we chatted incessantly of the dreams we had had during the night. My grandmother and my mother used to say that dreams com
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From the Publisher

When young Iqbal is sold into slavery at a carpet factory, his arrival changes everything for the other overworked and abused chidren there. It is Iqbal who explains to them that despite their master''s promises, he plans on keeping them as his slaves indefinetely. But it is also Iqbal who inspires the other children to look to a future free from toil...and is brave enough to show them how to get there.
This moving fictionalized account of the real Iqbal Masih is told through the voice of Fatima, a young Pakistani girl whose life is changed by Iqbal''s courage.

Appropriate for ages: 8

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