The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel

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The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel

by Richard C. Morais

Scribner | August 9, 2011 | Trade Paperback

The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel is rated 4.3 out of 5 by 10.
Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren and Om Puri, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, and produced by Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Juliet Blake, DreamWorks Studios, and Participant Media.

"That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist."

And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life’s journey in Richard Morais’s charming novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, The Hundred-Foot Journey is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste.

Born above his grandfather’s modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in Lumière, a small village in the French Alps.

The boisterous Haji family takes Lumière by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restaurant opposite an esteemed French relais—that of the famous chef Madame Mallory—and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restaurant, and a slew of new adventures.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages—charming, endearing, and compulsively readable.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.7 in

Published: August 9, 2011

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1439165653

ISBN - 13: 9781439165652

Found in: Fiction and Literature
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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating! Reaslly interesting, from India to France - and all that food!
Date published: 2014-10-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books I read in a while One of the best books which I have read in a long time. Cannot wait until the author writes another.
Date published: 2014-10-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Culinary tour I enjoyed this short sweet little read. A bit of a hidden gem, and a foodie's delight. Nothing terribly remarkable about the writing, the characters, or the storyline, but for some reason all aspects are very likeable and it works very well. I wish there had been more time in the kitchen with cooking skills and tricks of the trade revealed. But I was buoyed by Hassan's rise from relative poverty in Bombay to the restaurant elite in Paris and his journey along the way.
Date published: 2014-09-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read the book, skip the movie Well written, witty, entertaining, this is a little gem. I highly recommend it and suggest, from the reviews, that you skip the movie.
Date published: 2014-08-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The hundred yard Drool not only is the descriptions of the food sumptuous the writing makes you feel you are there watching the story unfold. you are in the country side or the markets choosing what you will make for your next meal.
Date published: 2014-08-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Succulent reading... MY REVIEW: Scribner|August 9, 2011|Trade Paperback|ISBN: 978-1-4391-6565-2 "That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist." And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life's journey in Richard Morais's charming novel, THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste. Born above his grandfather's modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in Lumiere, a small village in the French Alps. The boisterous Haji family takes Lumiere by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restuarant opposite an esteemed French relais-that of the famous chef Madame Mallory-and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restuarant, and slew of new adventures. THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages-charming, endearing, and compulsively readable. I don't have much to add to the Chapters synopsis of the book above other than to say that I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. I think Madame Mallory had a lot more to do with Hassan's success than everyone suspects, she was a very well-known and well respected chef in her time. I'll admit that I had no idea what half the dishes described in the pages of this book were but some of them sure sounded good and ones I'd certainly give a try. That is, if someone else cooked them for me! This is a book that would appeal to a large audience of folks and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
Date published: 2014-06-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Joy to read for any Foodie! This book was beautifully written. The dichotomy between a tutored and educated older chef with the brilliance of a unschooled young boy is touching. The way they admire each other's gifts and finally work together gives the reader a "foodie" delight. A book I would recommend over and over.
Date published: 2012-12-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Gorgeous and mouth-watering! Richard C. Morais' debut novel, The Hundred Foot Journey, is a travel book for anyone who has ever watched The Food Network and thought, "Wherever that kitchen is, that's where I want to go." Food is the language of this book. The character of Hassan Haji sometimes struggles with issues of identity and belonging as he travels from Mumbai to London to Lumiere to Paris, but always this struggle is phrased in terms of food: to make curry or frogs legs, to seek out tiffin boxes or fish and chips. Even his Muslim identity is mentioned rarely except when relating to diet: to eat pork or not. Ultimately Hassan's true identity is food. His religion is food. His ethnicity is food. His blood runs with curry and wine and butter and garlic and the jus of fresh oysters. It's as though Pi Patel from Life of Pi was experiencing some sort of cosmic opposites day: an Indian boy, instead of trying to find his way home while adrift and alone, is continually travelling further afield while being wrapped in the memories and support of his family; where Pi invented stories to quell his loneliness, Hassan sometimes longs for solitude so he may study the stories of the ancient cookbooks which surround him; where Pi's starvation was his constant companion, Hassan's one constant is food. To read more about this book or to read my other reviews, please visit my blog: http://cozylittlebookjournal.blogspot.ca/2012/03/hundred-foot-journey-by-richard-c.html
Date published: 2012-03-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A glimpse in the world of gourmet A straight forward book about a foreign family's hardship and a view of the complicated rise of a culinary chef. I kept thinking "what will become of them now"? It was a fairly simple story but i enjoyed it.
Date published: 2011-10-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Lovely tale for foodies The Good Stuff * Wonderfully vivid descriptions of the landscape and of the food * Nice light humour * Intriguing realistic characters * The food is described so vividly you will become hungry while reading. I don't even like Indian food, but I was drooling by the descriptions * I can definitely see this being made into a movie (author talks about this at the end in the acknowledgments) * Nice simple story, that makes you both laugh and cry and encompasses the important theme of forgiveness * Liked the recipes at the end, would have liked more though * Nice character development * Did I mention the food -- family enjoyed the creative meals I made after reading - plain old grilled chicken wasn't going to cut it after what I had read about The Not So Good Stuff * Think I gained 10 pounds while reading it, because I was hungry all the time * Story falters for a little 3/4 of way through, but does pick up again * Could have done without all the various descriptions of bodily fluids -- ick I got 2 kids I deal with poop all the time, don't want to read about it Favorite Quotes/Passages "And the strange people thronging and jostling on the sidewalks-- the ring-studded Goths in black leather and green Mohawks, the posh girls from private Hampstead day schools down for a bit of slumming, the winos lurching from rubbish bin to pub-- all this sea of humanity reassured me that as alien as I felt, there were always others in the world far odder than I." "But what Umar obviously didn't see, and I did, was that Abhidha's face was permanently lit by the most intriguing smile. I did not know where this smile came from, in a women of twenty-three, but it was if Allah had once whispered some cosmic joke into her ear, and from then on she walked through life filtering the world through this amusing take on events." "And in the depths of those glinting little eyes she sees the balance sheet of her life, an endless list of credits and debits, of accomplishments and failures, small acts of kindness and real acts of cruelty. And the tears finally came as she looks away, unable to see things to the very end, for she knows without looking of the terrible imbalance, how long ago the credits stopped while the debts of vanity and selfishness run on and on." Who Should/Shouldn't Read * Fans of Chocolot and Like Water For Chocolate will very much enjoy * Perfect for Foodies 4.25 Dewey's I received this from Simon and Schuster in exchange for an honest review - thanks guys for once again introducing me to a fantastic story that I probably never would have picked up
Date published: 2011-10-15

– More About This Product –

The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel

by Richard C. Morais

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.7 in

Published: August 9, 2011

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1439165653

ISBN - 13: 9781439165652

From the Publisher

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren and Om Puri, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, and produced by Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Juliet Blake, DreamWorks Studios, and Participant Media.

"That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist."

And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life’s journey in Richard Morais’s charming novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, The Hundred-Foot Journey is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste.

Born above his grandfather’s modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in Lumière, a small village in the French Alps.

The boisterous Haji family takes Lumière by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restaurant opposite an esteemed French relais—that of the famous chef Madame Mallory—and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restaurant, and a slew of new adventures.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages—charming, endearing, and compulsively readable.

About the Author

Richard C. Morais is the editor of Penta, a Barron¿s website and quarterly magazine. An American raised in Switzerland, Morais has lived most of his life overseas, returning to the United States in 2003. He is the author of The Hundred-Foot Journey, which is a New York Times Bestseller. He also wrote Buddhaland Brooklyn.

Editorial Reviews

“The novel’s charm lies in its improbability: it’s ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ meets ‘Ratatouille.’”

--New York Times Book Review
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