Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada (McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Religion)

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Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada (McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Religion)

by Phyllis D. Airhart

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ISBN - 10: 0773508821

ISBN - 13: 9780773508828

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Essential to Methodist revivalism was the personal conversion experience, which constituted the basis of salvation and church membership. Revivalism, maintains Airhart, was a distinctive form of piety and socialization that was critical in helping Methodists define who they were, colouring their understanding of how religion was to be experienced, practised, articulated, and cultivated. This revivalist piety, even more than doctrine or policy, was the identifying mark of Methodism in the nineteenth century. But, during the late Victorian era, the Methodist presentation of the religious life underwent a transformation. By 1925, when the Methodist Church was incorporated into the United Church of Canada, its most prominent leaders were espousing an approach to piety that was essentially, and sometimes explicitly, non-revivalist. The Methodist approach to personal religion changed during this transition and, significantly, Methodists increasingly became identified with social Christianity -- although experience remained a key aspect of their theology. There was also a growing tendency to associate revivalism with fundamentalism, a new religious development that used the Methodist language of conversion but was unappealing to Canadian Methodists. Airhart portrays the tensions between tradition and innovation through stories of the men and women who struggled to revitalize religion in an age when conventional social assumptions and institutions were being challenged by the ideals of the progressive movement. Serving the Present Age is an account of Canadian Methodist participation in a realignment of North American Protestantism which supporters believed would better enable them, in the words of a well-known Wesley hymn, "to serve the present age."

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Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada

by Phyllis D. Airhart

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Format: Hard Cover

Publisher: McGill Queens Univ Pr

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Signed by Author Hardcover 1st edition SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR-minor shelfwear and light chipping of dust jacket otherwise a fine clean tight copy. Essential to Methodist revivalism was the personal conversion experience, which constituted the basis of salvation and church membership. Revivalism, maintains Airhart, was a distinctive form of piety and socialization that was critical in helping Methodists define who they were, colouring their understanding of how religion was to be experienced, practised, articulated, and cultivated. This revivalist piety, even more than doctrine or policy, was the identifying mark of Methodism in the nineteenth century. But, during the late Victorian era, the Methodist presentation of the religious life underwent a transformation. By 1925, when the Methodist Church was incorporated into the United Church of Canada, its most prominent leaders were espousing an approach to piety that was essentially, and sometimes explicitly, non-revivalist. The Methodist approach to personal religion changed during this transition and, significantly, Methodists increasingly became identified with social Christianity--although experience remained a key aspect of their theology. There was also a growing tendency to associate revivalism with fundamentalism, a new religious development that used the Methodist language of conversion but was unappealing to Canadian Methodists. Airhart portrays the tensions between tradition and innovation through stories of the men and women who struggled to revitalize religion in an age when conventional social assumptions and institutions were being challenged by the ideals of the progressive movement. Serving the Present Age is an account of Canadian Methodist participation in a realignment of North American Protestantism which supporters believed would better enable them, in the words of a well-known Wesley hymn, to serve the present age.

$10.71

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada

by Phyllis D. Airhart

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Publisher: McGill Queens University Press

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Hardcover, 8vo, 218 pages. Like-new, unmarked in a like, unmarked dust jacket.

$49.66

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Traditi...

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Traditi...

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Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press

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Hardcover232 Pages. Foredges and dustcover are slightly marked. Essential to Methodist revivalism was the personal conversion experience, which constituted the basis of salvation and church membership. Revivalism, maintains Airhart, was a distinctive form of piety and socialization that was critical in helping Methodists define who they were, colouring their understanding of how religion was to be experienced, practised, articulated, and cultivated. This revivalist piety, even more than doctrine or policy, was the identifying mark of Methodism in the nineteenth century. But, during the late Victorian era, the Methodist presentation of the religious life underwent a transformation. By 1925, when the Methodist Church was incorporated into the United Church of Canada, its most prominent leaders were espousing an approach to piety that was essentially, and sometimes explicitly, non-revivalist. The Methodist approach to personal religion changed during this transition and, significantly, Methodists increasingly became identified with social Christianity--although experience remained a key aspect of their theology. There was also a growing tendency to associate revivalism with fundamentalism, a new religious development that used the Methodist language of conversion but was unappealing to Canadian Methodists. Airhart portrays the tensions between tradition and innovation through stories of the men and women who struggled to revitalize religion in an age when conventional social assumptions and institutions were being challenged by the ideals of the progressive movement. Serving the Present Age is an account of Canadian Methodist participation in a realignment of North American Protestantism which supporters believed would better enable them, in the words of a well-known Wesley hymn, to serve the present age.

$71.46

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada (McGill-Queen

Serving the Present Age: Revivalism, Progressivism, and the Methodist Tradition in Canada (McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Religion)

by Phyllis D. Airhart

Delivered in 3-5 weeks

Condition:

Format: Hardcover

Publisher: Mcgill Queens Univ Pr

Seller Comments:

0773508821 New Condition *** Right Off the Shelf | Ships within 2 Business Days ~~~ Customer Service Is Our Top Priority! -Thank you for LOOKING: -)

$160.83

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