1 Peter: A Handbook on the Greek Text by Mark Dubis1 Peter: A Handbook on the Greek Text by Mark Dubis

1 Peter: A Handbook on the Greek Text

byMark Dubis

Paperback | November 1, 2010

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In his analysis of the Greek text of 1 Peter, Mark Dubis provides students with an accessible guide through some of the most difficult syntactic challenges of the Greek language. Introducing readers to the most recent developments in grammatical and linguistic scholarship, Dubis includes an overview of Greek word order and the construction of middle voice. In doing so, Dubis helps students internalize the conventions of the Greek language while crafting in students a maturing appetite for future study.
Mark Dubis is Professor of Christian Studies in the School of Christian Studies at Union University. He lives in Jackson, Tennessee.
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Title:1 Peter: A Handbook on the Greek TextFormat:PaperbackDimensions:220 pages, 7.25 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:November 1, 2010Publisher:Baylor University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1932792627

ISBN - 13:9781932792621

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"Scholars as well as students should hail, and avail themselves of, this series."John H. Elliot, University of San Francisco, Review of Biblical Literature"For forty years we have been in need of an up-to-date analysis of the grammar and syntax of 1 Peter, and Dubis provides just that. Seminary students will rise up and call this book blessed for a generation. In addition, there's a rich and surprising interpretive history that is unfolded in this slim, packed volume."Scot McKnight, Karl A. Olsson Professor in Religious Studies, North Park University"This handbook on 1 Peter deserves comparison with the best of the recent commentaries on that epistle. Mark Dubis has provided students with the tools for evaluating and comparing the exegetical commentaries on which they must rely and will keep commentators honest by reminding them, line by line, of the actual wording and structure of the text."Ramsey Michaels, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies, Southwest Missouri State University