3001 The Final Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke3001 The Final Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke

3001 The Final Odyssey

byArthur C. Clarke

Mass Market Paperback | January 28, 1998

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One thousand years after the Jupiter mission to explore the mysterious Monolith had been destroyed, after Dave Bowman was transformed into the Star Child, Frank Poole drifted in space, frozen and forgotten, leaving the supercomputer HAL inoperable. But now Poole has returned to life, awakening in a world far different from the one he left behind--and just as the Monolith may be stirring once again. . . .

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Arthur C. Clarke is considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time and is an international treasure in many other ways, including the fact that an article by him in 1945 led to the invention of satellite technology. Books by Mr. Clarke--both fiction and nonfiction--have more than one hundred million copies in print worldwid...
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Title:3001 The Final OdysseyFormat:Mass Market PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 6.85 × 4.17 × 0.84 inPublished:January 28, 1998Publisher:Random House Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0345423496

ISBN - 13:9780345423498

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Customer Reviews of 3001 The Final Odyssey

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Weakest in series, but still worth reading Obviously the finalé is the weakest in this series, but I still found it incredibly enjoyable and it was still something I was in a rush to read after finishing all the previous instalments. Clark stays true to his form of hard and plausible sci-fi and provides closure to the 2001 series. You won't want to miss how things wrap up and come to a close in the fascinating universe that he started back in Space Odyssey.
Date published: 2017-09-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from 3001: The Final Odyssey (Space Odyssey #4) by Arthur C. Clarke 3001: The Final Odyssey is ultimately a flawed book, written to end a series which has sadly become increasingly redundant. Sad? Yes, because Arthur C. Clarke was a phenomenally good scientist with a lively imagination and the ability to craft very readable novel
Date published: 2017-06-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book This one closes out the whole saga well
Date published: 2017-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from 3001: The Final Odyssey A thousand years ago the Monolith was uncovered on the moon, Dave Bowman embarked on the greatest voyage in the history of mankind, and Frank Poole was killed by the confusion of HAL. Poole is now found, exposed to space for a thousand years and revived. His friends, Bowman and HAL, tell him the beings that sent Bowman on his fantastic voyage have decided the fate of man and judgment is on its way. What have they decided? Will we be spared, or destroyed?
Date published: 2000-08-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A meander down memory lane As usual for Clarke, the science is pretty good. Unfortunately, there's so much time spent dropping names of famous scientists, events, etc, that it's distracting. By analogy, could we discern between the important people at the end of the 10th century as opposed to those in the 9th or 11th? Of course, not, unless you're a professor of history specialising in that time period. There is such a character in 3001, but it seems tacked on. More interesting is the subplot with the monolith and the contact with Dave/Hal. Sure, there are incosistencies, but none so major as the Saturn/Jupiter shift between 2001 and 2010 (i.e. 2010 is a sequel to 2001 the movie, not 2001 the book), but, like Isaac Asimov, Clarke never lets a little thing like continuity get in the way of writing a story the way he thinks it should be written at the time he's writing it. That he's forthcoming and honest about it makes me tend to ignore it. Looking at the total of the story at the end, you can't help but feel a little nostalgia for this particular little universe Clarke has created. While not up to the standards of 2001 and 2010, I don't think it would suffer a comparison with 2061. It really is time for this storyline to terminate, and I am encouraged that he's called this one the Final Odyssey.
Date published: 2000-06-15

From Our Editors

One thousand years after the Jupiter mission to explore the mysterious Monolith had been destroyed, after Dave Bowman was transformed into the Star Child, Frank Poole drifted in space, frozen and forgotten, leaving the supercomputer HAL inoperable. But now Poole has returned to life, awakening in a world far different from the one he left behind--and just as the Monolith may be stirring once again.

Editorial Reviews

"3001: The Final Odyssey has an eerie and compelling plausibility."--Business Week"A fascinating picture of our future: cities atop needlelike towers that extend into space, the colonization of Venus, the pacification of humanity, and the abolition of religion."--Newsweek"Science-fiction master Arthur C. Clarke has taken generations of readers to the far and lonely reaches of the universe."--USA TodayFrom the Trade Paperback edition.