Braco

Paperback | October 17, 2012

byLesleyanne Ryan

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WINNER OF THE 2011 Fresh Fish Award for Emerging Writers, Lesleyanne Ryan's debut novel, Braco, takes place over the five days fol¬lowing the fall of Srebrenica in 1995. The narrative follows the perspectives of Bosnian civilians, UN Peacekeepers, Serbian and Bosnian soldiers, as well as a Canadian photojournalist. A retired veteran and former Bosnian Peacekeeper, Ryan vividly captures the visceral tension and horror of Bosnian refugees fleeing Srebrenica, the ensuing massacre of Bosnian men, and the inability of the Dutch peacekeepers to protect them. The award judges acclaimed the debut novel as a "compelling, captivating, and fast-paced novel, from its vivid and intriguing prologue set in Srebrenica to an ending that fits, if not satisfies."

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From the Publisher

WINNER OF THE 2011 Fresh Fish Award for Emerging Writers, Lesleyanne Ryan's debut novel, Braco, takes place over the five days fol¬lowing the fall of Srebrenica in 1995. The narrative follows the perspectives of Bosnian civilians, UN Peacekeepers, Serbian and Bosnian soldiers, as well as a Canadian photojournalist. A retired veteran an...

WINNER OF THE 2011 Fresh Fish Award for Emerging Writers
Format:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.8 inPublished:October 17, 2012Publisher:Breakwater Books Ltd.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:155081334X

ISBN - 13:9781550813340

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Heartbreaking and Remarkable Tale This is remarkable storytelling from debut author, Lesleyanne Ryan, a retired Canadian peacekeeper who served in Bosnia in the 1990s. Ryan's heartbreaking tale, shrouded in historical truth, intersects the lives of six very different characters during the fall of Srebrenicia over a five day period in July 1995. Ryan masterfully weaves six points of view through the factual what was and the fictional what might have been as she reveals the horrors of what happened while the world turned a blind eye and peacekeepers were rendered helpless. A heart-wrenching and courageous story, Braco is by no means a light read. You will frantically flip the pages as you race to find out what happens to young Atif, a character based on a real 14-year old boy, a point that just makes the story all the more real and your stomach churn at the stark reminder of the darkness of humanity.
Date published: 2013-10-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Braco by Lesleyanne Ryan In a word, Braco is breathtaking. This book has already won the Fresh Fish Award for 2011, and is now nominated for the Margaret and John Savage first book award category at the Atlantic Book Awards - it's easy to see why. Lesleyanne Ryan has written a riveting account of the fall of Srebrenica in 1995. She's told it from six points of view and has maintained an almost journalistic style of writing. Initially I feared that six POVs might be cumbersome, but in fact it adds to her story. It enables the reader to see the conflict from as many perspectives as possible, thus reminding us that there are many versions of history and the truth is usually found somewhere in the middle. I don't want to give away any spoilers, so I'll simply say that the images and actions described in this novel are vivid, heart-wrenching and real. Although this is a work of fiction, it's based on actual events. In the end, this is an incredible story of the human will to survive. You might want a tissue box nearby.
Date published: 2013-05-14
Rated out of 5 by from "What you see is not true and what is true is not seen." Braco follows the journey of a young boy as he and his family flee Srebrenica to escape the approaching Serbian army. Told from six points of view: the boy, his mother, a Dutch peacekeeper, a Canadian journalist, a Serb soldier, and a Bosnian soldier. Braco gives a broad spectrum of the war and its impact on those caught in its grip. I wasn't sure about the multiple points of view at first. The story is primarily about the boy, Atif, and his desperate attempt to survive and so I worried the other POVs would jar and confuse me. They didn't. Not by a long shot. What became apparent was that the author wanted the reader to see that the business of war is not black and white. Many shades lie between and as the Dutch peacekeepers and Canadian journalists often question, "Bad guys?" or "Good guys?". Lines blur in the midst of chaos. Ryan's writing is clean and concise. I love the almost journalistic style which allowed me to connect at my own pace. The subject material in this novel is disturbing and I wasn't bombarded by the author preaching what I should feel. I appreciated that. Braco is an incredible novel telling an incredible story. I look forward to many more from this author.
Date published: 2013-04-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Read This book was an amazing read. It gave a glimpse of a part of human history that many people know very little about, myself included. Even though the story itself is a work of fiction it is based on true events and it gave a perfect idea of what it must of been like living in this part of the world during this terrible war. I highly recommend reading this book and educating yourself further about this part of our history.
Date published: 2013-03-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Terrific Read! An extremely well written, captivating and thought provoking book. This gripping story is told from the perspectives of a mother, two soldiers, a photographic journalist, a peacekeeper and a teenage boy. A wonderful effort for a first time author. This book is highly recommended.
Date published: 2012-10-06

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Editorial Reviews

"Braco speaks of the part of us that can be charged with hate and do monstrous things. The part of us that can be filled with impotence and keep us up at night with regret... Ryan casts us as villains, victims, and bystanders. She puts us on either end of the monster's gun - capable of killing, being killed, or standing idly by. And the net result leaves us not with answers as to why, but with the survivor's quandary of now what?