The Cult Of The Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media…

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The Cult Of The Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media…

by Andrew Keen

Crown Publishing Group | June 5, 2007 | Hardcover

The Cult Of The Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media are destroying our econom is rated 1 out of 5 by 1.
Amateur hour has arrived, and the audience is running the show

In a hard-hitting and provocative polemic, Silicon Valley insider and pundit Andrew Keen exposes the grave consequences of today’s new participatory Web 2.0 and reveals how it threatens our values, economy, and ultimately the very innovation and creativity that forms the fabric of American achievement.

Our most valued cultural institutions, Keen warns—our professional newspapers, magazines, music, and movies—are being overtaken by an avalanche of amateur, user-generated free content. Advertising revenue is being siphoned off by free classified ads on sites like Craigslist; television networks are under attack from free user-generated programming on YouTube and the like; file-sharing and digital piracy have devastated the multibillion-dollar music business and threaten to undermine our movie industry. Worse, Keen claims, our “cut-and-paste” online culture—in which intellectual property is freely swapped, downloaded, remashed, and aggregated—threatens over 200 years of copyright protection and intellectual property rights, robbing artists, authors, journalists, musicians, editors, and producers of the fruits of their creative labors.

In today’s self-broadcasting culture, where amateurism is celebrated and anyone with an opinion, however ill-informed, can publish a blog, post a video on YouTube, or change an entry on Wikipedia, the distinction between trained expert and uninformed amateur becomes dangerously blurred. When anonymous bloggers and videographers, unconstrained by professional standards or editorial filters, can alter the public debate and manipulate public opinion, truth becomes a commodity to be bought, sold, packaged, and reinvented.

The very anonymity that the Web 2.0 offers calls into question the reliability of the information we receive and creates an environment in which sexual predators and identity thieves can roam free. While no Luddite—Keen pioneered several Internet startups himself—he urges us to consider the consequences of blindly supporting a culture that endorses plagiarism and piracy and that fundamentally weakens traditional media and creative institutions.

Offering concrete solutions on how we can rein in the free-wheeling, narcissistic atmosphere that pervades the Web, THE CULT OF THE AMATEUR is a wake-up call to each and every one of us.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 240 pages, 8.55 × 5.8 × 0.97 in

Published: June 5, 2007

Publisher: Crown Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385520808

ISBN - 13: 9780385520805

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Hyperbolic and misleading The Cult of the Amateur argues that blogs and social networking sites like MySpace and YouTube are destroying America's culture. These interactive technologies and the trends they enable are, to use Andrew Keen's words, scary, horrible, ominous, grave, chilling, disturbing, threatening, and nightmarish. A frequent contributor to William Kristol's Weekly Standard magazine, Keen posits an edenic world where not long ago "our collective intellectual history was driven by the careful aggregation of truth--through professionally edited books and reference materials, newspapers, and radio and television." But now, he says, the Internet has infected our culture with mistakes and fraud. Keen does make valid points along the way. A couple of them: * It's important to be able to distinguish between credible and worthless sources of information. * Parents and teachers should educate kids about dangers on the Internet. Parents should set browser filters and should place their computers in a family room, rather than in the kid's bedroom. But his valid points are embedded among off-topic rants and weepy sympathy for media giants like the Disney Company and Time Warner. And sounding at times like a Bible-waving evangelist, Keen claims that America's moral fabric is unraveling because of blogs, wikis, and social networking sites: "The Web 2.0 seduces us into acting on our most deviant instincts and allows us to succumb to our most destructive vices. It is corroding and corrupting the values we share as a nation." In other words, Keen uses hyperbole and misleading statements to argue that the Internet/Web 2.0 is bad because it's full of hyperbole and misleading statements.
Date published: 2008-12-31

– More About This Product –

The Cult Of The Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media are destroying our econom

The Cult Of The Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media…

by Andrew Keen

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 240 pages, 8.55 × 5.8 × 0.97 in

Published: June 5, 2007

Publisher: Crown Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385520808

ISBN - 13: 9780385520805

About the Book

In a hard-hitting and provocative polemic, Silicon Valley insider Keen exposes the grave consequences of todays new participatory Web 2.0. He reveals how amateur, user-generated free content threatens the very innovation and creativity that forms the fabric of American achievement.

Read from the Book

1The Great SeductionFirst a confession. Back in the Nineties, I was a pioneer in the first Internet gold rush. With the dream of making the world a more musical place, I founded Audiocafe.com, one of the earliest digital music sites. Once, when asked by a San Francisco Bay area newspaper reporter how I wanted to change the world, I replied, half seriously, that my fantasy was to have music playing from “every orifice,” to hear the whole Bob Dylan oeuvre from my laptop computer, to be able to download Johann Sebastian Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos from my cellular phone.So yes, I peddled the original Internet dream. I seduced investors and I almost became rich. This, therefore, is no ordinary critique of Silicon Valley. It’s the work of an apostate, an insider now on the outside who has poured out his cup of Kool–Aid and resigned his membership in the cult. My metamorphosis from believer into skeptic lacks cinematic drama. I didn’t break down while reading an incorrect Wikipedia entry about T. H. Huxley or get struck by lightning while doing a search for myself on Google. My epiphany didn’t involve a dancing coyote, so it probably wouldn’t be a hit on YouTube. It took place over forty–eight hours, in September 2004, on a two–day camping trip with a couple of hundred Silicon Valley utopians. Sleeping bag under my arm, rucksack on my back, I marched into camp a member of the cult; two days later, feeling queasy, I left an unbeliever.The camping trip took place in Sebastopol, a sm
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From the Publisher

Amateur hour has arrived, and the audience is running the show

In a hard-hitting and provocative polemic, Silicon Valley insider and pundit Andrew Keen exposes the grave consequences of today’s new participatory Web 2.0 and reveals how it threatens our values, economy, and ultimately the very innovation and creativity that forms the fabric of American achievement.

Our most valued cultural institutions, Keen warns—our professional newspapers, magazines, music, and movies—are being overtaken by an avalanche of amateur, user-generated free content. Advertising revenue is being siphoned off by free classified ads on sites like Craigslist; television networks are under attack from free user-generated programming on YouTube and the like; file-sharing and digital piracy have devastated the multibillion-dollar music business and threaten to undermine our movie industry. Worse, Keen claims, our “cut-and-paste” online culture—in which intellectual property is freely swapped, downloaded, remashed, and aggregated—threatens over 200 years of copyright protection and intellectual property rights, robbing artists, authors, journalists, musicians, editors, and producers of the fruits of their creative labors.

In today’s self-broadcasting culture, where amateurism is celebrated and anyone with an opinion, however ill-informed, can publish a blog, post a video on YouTube, or change an entry on Wikipedia, the distinction between trained expert and uninformed amateur becomes dangerously blurred. When anonymous bloggers and videographers, unconstrained by professional standards or editorial filters, can alter the public debate and manipulate public opinion, truth becomes a commodity to be bought, sold, packaged, and reinvented.

The very anonymity that the Web 2.0 offers calls into question the reliability of the information we receive and creates an environment in which sexual predators and identity thieves can roam free. While no Luddite—Keen pioneered several Internet startups himself—he urges us to consider the consequences of blindly supporting a culture that endorses plagiarism and piracy and that fundamentally weakens traditional media and creative institutions.

Offering concrete solutions on how we can rein in the free-wheeling, narcissistic atmosphere that pervades the Web, THE CULT OF THE AMATEUR is a wake-up call to each and every one of us.

About the Author

ANDREW KEEN is a Silicon Valley entrepreneur whose writings on culture, media, and technology have appeared in The Weekly Standard, Fast Company, The San Francisco Chronicle, Listener, and Jazziz. As the Founder, President and CEO of Audiocafe.com, he has been featured in Esquire, Industry Standard, and many other magazines and newspapers. He is the host of the acclaimed Internet show AfterTV and frequently appears on radio and television. He lives in Berkeley, California.

Editorial Reviews

What the experts are saying about Andrew Keen’s thought-provoking polemic“My initial reaction to the book was: ‘Geez, I have a lot of things to think about now.’ For people immersed in the social communities of Web 2.0, this is bound to be a thought-provoking and sobering book. While I don't agree with everything Keen says, there is page after page of really interesting insight and research. I look forward to the much-needed debate about the problems that Keen articulates—which can't be lightly dismissed.”—Larry Sanger, co-founder, Wikipedia and founder, Citizendium“Marvelous and provocative . . . . I think this is a powerful stop and breathe book in the midst of the obsessions and abstraction of folks seeking comfort in Web 2.0. Beautifully written too.”—Chris Schroeder, former CEO, WashingtonPost/Newsweek online and CEO, Health Central Network “Important . . . will spur some very constructive debate. This is a book that can produce positive changes to the current inertia of web 2.0.—Martin Green, vice president of community, CNET“For anyone who thinks that technology alone will make for a better democracy, Andrew Keen will make them think twice.”—Andrew Rasiej, founder, Personal Democracy Forum“Very engaging, and quite controversial and provocative. He doesn’t hold back any punches.”—Dan Farber, editor-in-chief, ZDNet“Andrew Keen is a brilliant, witty, classically-educated technoscold—and thank goodness. The world needs an intellectual Goliath to slay Web 2.0's army of Davi
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