Frankenstein

Paperback | September 1, 2004

byMary Wollstonecraft ShelleyEditor1stWorld Library

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Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library-Literary Society is a non-profit educational organization. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings. I arrived here yesterday, and my first task is to assure my dear sister of my welfare and increasing confidence in the success of my undertaking. I am already far north of London, and as I walk in the streets of Petersburgh, I feel a cold northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces my nerves and fills me with delight. Do you understand this feeling? This breeze, which has travelled from the regions towards which I am advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my daydreams become more fervent and vivid. I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight. There, Margaret, the sun is forever visible, its broad disk just skirting the horizon and diffusing a perpetual splendour. There - for with your leave, my sister, I will put some trust in preceding navigators - there snow and frost are banished; and, sailing over a calm sea, we may be wafted to a land surpassing in wonders and in beauty every region hitherto discovered on the habitable globe. Its productions and features may be without example, as the phenomena of the heavenly bodies undoubtedly are in those undiscovered solitudes. What may not be expected in a country of eternal light? I may there discover the wondrous power which attracts the needle and may regulate a thousand celestial observations that require only this voyage to render their seeming eccentricities consistent forever. I shall satiate my ardent curiosity with the sight of a part of the world never before visited, and may tread a land never before imprinted by the foot of man. These are my enticements, and they are sufficient to conquer all fear of danger or death and to induce me to commence this labourious voyage with the joy a child feels when he embarks in a little boat, with his holiday mates, on an expedition of discovery up his native river. But supposing all these conjectures to be false, you cannot contest the inestimable benefit which I shall confer on all mankind, to the last generation, by discovering a passage near the pole to those countries, to reach which at present so many months are requisite; or by ascertaining the secret of the magnet, which, if at all possible, can only be effected by an undertaking such as mine.

From the Publisher

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library-Literary Society is a non-profit educational organization. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise w...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:276 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.62 inPublished:September 1, 2004Publisher:1st World Library - Literary SocietyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1595401113

ISBN - 13:9781595401113

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Customer Reviews of Frankenstein

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good, but disturbing This is what happens when you run away from your responsibilities. You create a monster. It's a great classic, and not at all what I expected from what I knew of the story from the movies.
Date published: 2016-11-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A classic This book is a classic, and it's still wildly entertaining. I would recommend to anybody looking for a great story!
Date published: 2014-11-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books I've ever read A dark well written novel that makes you wonder who the real monster is
Date published: 2014-09-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Frankenstein Does anyone feel, like I do, that Victor Frankenstein was the monster in this novel? He was the cause of all the destruction but yet thought he was blameless, he sought to lay all blame at the feet of the creature.
Date published: 2013-09-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Literary Gold. . . Alas, I have not had the delightful pleasure to read this novel since my tender youthful days. The sheer beauty for which this novel was written was wasted on my naïve youthfulness. The plot of this novel is forever iconic and will forever remain in our collective culture. The novel is a tale of a man whose life ambition is to abolish dead from society and preserve life. Instead he creates a being which after completion he rejects, only to have terrible and unfortunate events to follow. I’m forever grateful that I’ve reread Frankenstein, for now I consider it one of my favourite books. I implore anyone who hasn’t read this novel, to go and grab a copy. This is literature at its finest, and from such a young author that such a feat is unfathomable. This is truly a treasure to the world and should be cherished for all eternity.
Date published: 2012-02-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A moving, disturbing, depressing, but also touching tale Much like Bram Stoker's "Dracula", Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is a story we all think we know, but really don't. Very few films have consciously attempted to follow the novel too closely (which shouldn't detract from the excellent James Whale/Boris Karloff film, or its masterpiece-sequel, "The Bride of Frankenstein). Thus, everything popular culture "knows" about "Frankenstein" does not originate from literature, but from films. This is a shame, in a way, because the novel itself is, if not the progenitor, an early vessel of so many archetypes found science fiction and horror. The basic plot remained intact when transferred to other media. Swiss medical student Victor Frankenstein discovers the secret of life (which he never reveals, lest someone repeat the mistake). He then puts together a body, essentially a man, from various corpses. He then becomes horrified by the creature he has built, and abandons. The creature, suffering a great deal of neglect and abuse, still manages to get a thorough education, and learns of his lineage. After murdering Victor's younger brother, and framing the family maid, the creature tells his (admittedly) sad tale to his "father", and then demands a mate. Victor, in a panic, agrees, then thinks better of it at the last moment, destroying the new bride. In retaliation, the creature murders all of Victor's loved ones (including his wife), and leads Victor on a merry chase across the world. Most probably know that Mary Shelley wrote this book in response to a challenge issued by Lord Byron, during a vacation at Lake Geneva. (Along with this story came John Polidori's "The Vampyre", the first English vampire novel.) Most probably also know that Shelley went on to write other works of imaginative gothic fiction. Still, her modern reputation rests with this book, understandably. As stated, numerous archetypes (themes, plot lines, characters) are present here. The basic fear of what evil technology may bring along with the good is a central theme, as is the warning against playing God. So is the implicit admonition to be responsible in all things, be it during innovation or being a parent. The creature is, for all intents and purposes, an android-everyone from Gort to C-3PO owe their existence to the Frankenstein monster. And the monster that slays all but one protagonist is a staple of horror, be it traditional monster movies, like "Alien", or more realistic slasher movies like "Halloween". But, as I noted at the beginning of this review, certain of these elements have been lost in most interpretations. The creature is actually intelligent, and well-spoken, quite different from the inarticulate grunts or slow, half-sentences of the movies (again, no disrespect to Karloff). Further, while the films have made lightening a staple of the creatures creation, Shelley never really explains the process (probably knowing that she might interfere with the plausibility of her work). Finally, one of the staples of the films is the explanation for the creatures "evil" nature. Often, the problem lies with the brain used, which almost invariably is a criminal brain, or is damaged before implantation. In the book, the creature is really a child that's horribly neglected, but with the strength and intelligence to strike back: id without superego, and without restraints. Thus, "Frankenstein" will be a new experience for readers who have never experienced it. Unlike "Dracula", there aren't any moments where a reader might look up and suddenly realize how quiet it is in the house, or how dark it's gotten outside. In that regard, "Frankenstein" has not aged particularly well. Throughout, however, it is a moving, disturbing, depressing, but also a touching and beautiful tale. Those qualities have withstood the test of time. While it is not always a rollicking adventure, it is a rewarding read.
Date published: 2009-09-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Classic while I really enjoyed reading this book from a classical lit perspective, people should be ready that it really isn't anything like how the movies portay Frankenstein's monster. It can be a bit wordy at times and a little drawn out at places. Loved it all the same. ^_^
Date published: 2008-08-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Frankenstein has all the best. The romance, the action and the inner depth of morality. The story is that of passion and the sorrow the "monster" feels throughout his short life and the power of the human soul. At the worst time the beast wanted nothing more than that of comfort and a companion, to which he was denied. A tale of promise and literature and the power and consequence of knowledge. A must for all who read...
Date published: 2006-07-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I did this for grade 11 eng independent study... ...and it was great. The book was recommended to me by by teacher. I thought, since it was of literary value, that it must be boring. But it is very interesting, and you can actually understand it and relate to it. Before buying the book, I read online reviews and was disappointed because lots os people urged others not to read it. I would recommend this books to others, though. My personal background: I like to read a variety of materials, do well in english, and never read classic novels outside of study purposes.
Date published: 2004-10-23