Hoot

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Hoot

by Carl Hiaasen

Random House Children's Books | December 27, 2005 | Trade Paperback

Hoot is rated 4.5522 out of 5 by 67.
A book for young readers. It involves new kids, bullies, alligators, eco-warriors, pancakes, and pint-sized owls. A hilarious
Floridian adventure!

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 7.62 × 5.2 × 0.7 in

Published: December 27, 2005

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0440419395

ISBN - 13: 9780440419396

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great! I cannot believe the way this story was put together. Its about a boy who moves to Florida and finds himself on an adventure. Amazing book! Read it :) Others by Carl Hiaasen: Flush and Scat amazing too!
Date published: 2009-10-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Real Page Turner Roy Eberhardt is a new kid in school. Roy is the victim of Dana Matherson, a bully. He discovered “running boy”, the same boy who turned this book into an ecological mystery. Carl Hiaasen kept reminding me what happened before which really helps. Roy helps “Mullet Fingers” and Beatrice stand up for the burrowing owls, which is like saying, stand up for what you believe in. I also liked how while you read this book you can imagine what’s happening. I don’t really like how the book is split in two then at the end it comes together. It really confuses you. Also, I wish it could’ve been longer. This book is interesting and a real page turner. I would recommend this book to everyone who likes animals and adventure. Jess
Date published: 2008-11-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ABSOULUTLEY LOVED THIS!! I know this dosent seem or look like the most interesting book but its really interseting..Definaley a page turner and I dont usually read that much..I loved it it kept me hooked but I wouldnt recommend this for adults...I really want to see the moive..Its a feel good book that charming and funny in its own little way..Its just not a popular book
Date published: 2008-10-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A funny and heartwarming story for any person of any age!!!! Roy Eberhardt is a seventh grader who has just moved to Coconut Cove, Florida. Roy has always been the new kid because he's always moving! He thinks it will be a boring experience, but not for long. One morning Roy gets on the school bus. This year's bully...Dana Matherson! Dana sneaks up behind Roy and smashes his face against the window. OUCH!!! That's when he discovered the "running boy". Roy was curious and that's the first interesting thing he has seen in Florida. He sets himself on the boys trail and soon discovers that the Mother Paula's Pancake House that is going to be built soon isn't such a great idea. There are owls living in burrows on the property. He also meets the boy's step sister, Beatrice. Can Roy, the running boy, and Beatrice stop the building of Mother Paula's? Maybe, maybe not.
Date published: 2008-08-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Rad Read! Hoot was a great book! From the first page, I couldn't put it down, because it was too funny! The only issue with me & Hoot is the reading level is a little too easy for me, because I like to be challenged when I read, still great story line though!
Date published: 2008-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very Good This book is very good. The characters are very cool. a really good page turner and a must read so yeah... everyone should read the book then watch the movie witch is on dvd now its also called hoot and its really good.
Date published: 2007-02-17
Rated out of 5 by from Winner of a Parents' Choice Silver Honor Award Just another new-kid-in-school story becomes an ecological mystery thriller in this story by Carl Hiaasen. Roy has been moved, again, and finds himself in Florida rather than the Montana he so misses. And again, the slight boy is the target of the class bully; but he also becomes embroiled with a mysterious young boy with “eco-terrorism” leanings. Who might have guessed that burrowing owls would soon change Roy’s life? Can young people truly fight the evil powers of land development? The sub-plots are both suspenseful and amusing, sometimes both at once. Chad Lowe does a generally fine job of distinguishing child from adult, good-hearted from sinister, and his burrowing owl characterization is uncanny. Fast-pacing, eccentric characters, and quirky twists will guarantee the popularity of this audio book. For more details on the Parents' Choice Foundation, please visit www.parents-choice.org
Date published: 2006-11-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting Book! I think that Hoot by Carl Hiaasen was a pretty good book. Carl kept you in touch of what was going on and reminded you of what had happened earlier on in the book. My favourite part was when "mullet fingers" took "Roy" to the construction sight and showed him the owls. I suggest this book to people who like to read about people making a difference and "standing-up" for someone else. Overall I thought it was a good book.
Date published: 2006-06-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Mom thinks this is a Great Story! My daughters wanted to see this movie, so I decided to read the book first. This is a wonderful story, even for parents! I got into the habit of reading books myself, that my daughters might like. This book has wonderful characters that kids could really relate to. It is humorous, suspenseful, cute, and has a good moral for kids to stand up for what they believe is right. It is a page turner, you're always wanting to see what's going to happen next! Great book!
Date published: 2006-06-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hoot is a fun book. Hoot is the first young adult novel by Carl Hiaasen who has a good reputation for fun adult oriented environmental thrillers. Hoot has the same fun and humour and the same overall plot as Hiaasen’s adult books (that is, ecologically fragile Florida is threatened by some corrupt bad-guy) minus the adult content. And, Hiaasen was successful. Hoot was selected as a 2003 Newbery Honor Book. In Hoot, Mother Paula’s All-American Pancake House is the corporate bad-guy whose newest location threatens a population of endangered burrowing owls. A barefoot kid who goes by the name of “Mullet Fingers” and has a lot of Huck Finn in him is desperate to save the owls using quite a bit of amusing mischief. But it is the new kid from Montana – Roy - whose family has just moved to Florida who is the hero of Hoot. Branded “cow-girl” and “Tex”, Roy has to battle bullies, befriend the toughest girl in school, track down “Mullet Fingers” and ultimately use his brains to figure out a way to stop the destruction “once and for all” of the burrowing owls’ home. The tagline for the movie version of Hoot (which follows the book quite faithfully) has it right: “It's time to stand up for the little guys.”’ Hoot is all about doing what’s right and what’s right is to take a stand against all sorts of bullies.
Date published: 2006-06-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...excellent story... Hoot, a novel written by Carl Hiaasen, is the story about the fight to save the owls from a chain pancake restaurant, Mother Paula's. Mother Paula's construction site is the same location as that of some owls' burrows. This causes a boy, known sometimes as Mullet Fingers, to protest using strange methods such as removing seats from the tractors. One day, when Roy Eberhardt is being bullied on the bus, he notices Mullet Fingers running somewhere. Roy wonders who that boy is and why he isn't in school. Soon enough, Roy's in the race to save the owls. What I liked about this book is the dialogue between characters and the description of situations. What the characters say makes sense and usually has an edge of humor to it. The conversations are clear, and I never got confused about who was talking. The many details supplied helped build the atmosphere and visualize what was happening in all the situations and scenes. However, I found that some situations were slightly unrealistic. Sometimes characters' reactions didn't seem appropriate considering what had happened. For example, whenever Roy goes out, his mother rarely questions him about where he's going. Even after Roy's lost in a thunderstorm, or his mother worries to death thinking her child's in a hospital, only to arrive and see he's not there, Mrs. Eberhardt does not seem very concerned about her son's whereabouts. I'm sorry Mr. Hiaasen, but I'm not buying it here. Other than that, Hoot was an excellent story with surprises. The ending of the story was wonderful. It could be possible to change it. Maybe the pancake house would still be allowed to build their newest restaurant where they originally intended. Maybe Mother Paula's could sue. Maybe the owls wouldn't live. But all these changes would be wrong and would make a great story go bad. It would be like having a perfectly ripe apple in your hand, guaranteed to be delicious, but when you bite into it, you notice a wormhole. I would never eat an apple with a wormhole, just as I would never enjoy a story with a bad ending or any other bad situation within the covers of the book. If it was possible that I could change one thing about this story, I'm not sure what I would choose to do. There really is nothing of horrible about this book to change. Remember the apple? I think this book would appeal to most people, but I think it would really strike home and inspire those who wanted to change something to make this world a better place. Hoot, reminds me of the movie Erin Brockovich . Even though issues dealt with in each story were completely different, both of them had to deal with characters standing up for what they thought was right. I admire that quality, and that's what I think makes Hoot so special. All in all, Hoot is definitely a great book. It's funny, original, and completely different from what you might expect it to be. It's definitely a winner!
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...David vs. Goliath... I really liked this book because its main theme is animals, nature and the environment. It also appealed to me because the main character was a boy close to my age and I could identify with him. Hoot is really a David vs. Goliath story - in this case David is an uneducated, homeless, shoeless boy named Napoleon (also known as Mullet Fingers). The Goliath he faces is Mother Paulo's Pancake Company, a huge company that is building a new House of Pancakes in Napoleon's home town of Coconut Cove in Florida. The reason Napoleon finds himself facing off with the company is because the site of their new pancake house is home to several families of burrowing owls, a tiny endangered species of owl that live in burrows they excavate in the ground. In the end, with the help of his protective step sister, Beatrice and a new kid in town named Roy, Napoleon was able to put an end to the construction and save the owls. At first, some of the methods he used were perhaps a bit questionable and came close to breaking the law. But Roy, with the help of his father, was able to prove that the company had not gone through the proper procedure to get approval to build at the site. The book shows the reader that if you really believe in something you can make a big difference. Also, it make us think about how we as humans are treating our environment, threatening birds, animals, and habitats. One of the sub-themes that author Carl Hiaasen gets us thinking about is the importance of family to kids. He gives us three different examples. Roy's family are very caring and loving and support him through all kinds of things from problems at school to helping the owls. The bully Dana Matheson's family is opposite of Roy's. Dana's parents are not supportive and are mean to him - it's easy to see where he gets his bullying tendencies. And finally, Beatrice and Napoleon's family show us a family life without love and where all the parents care about is themselves. Even though Napoleon has not had a loving family and spent most of his time away from his family, he was still able to care about the owls enough to save them. I though Hiaasen wrote with lots of descriptive words that painted clear pictures in my mind. I especially liked the part in the book where Napoleon took Roy to a secluded sunken boat to show Roy how to catch a mullet with his bare hands. This is the section where I felt Roy and Napoleon's bond of friendship really began. This book teaches us many things. The value of our environment, how one person can make a difference so you should fight for what you believe in and it emphasizes the futility of bullying and the importance of family. It's a great read that I would recommend to anyone who loves animals and adventure.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...hilarious yet complicated... With two stories combined into one, Hoot is a hilarious yet complicated, mystery. From trying to fit in at school to saving baby owls from a pancake house, guys and girls will both find this book relatable and will want more! So, if you haven't read this amazing book, I definitely suggest you check it out!
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...AWSOME... Roy is always moving. He used to live in Montana, but he has now moved to Florida. He thinks DisneyWorld was an armpit compared to Montana. But one day in the school bus, when the bully Dana Matherson bashes Roy's head against the window, Roy sees a strange barefoot boy running away from the bus. Roy soon senses a mystery. After all, how many times could you find a boy who is barefoot, has no school stuff and is running away from the school bus? Discovering burrowing owls, potty-trained aligators and many other amazing Florida discoveries, Roy is on the case with his friend Beatrice Leep. Life in Florida is starting to look up. I think this was an AWSOME book! It would be great for any mystery lovers! The characters were SOOO realistic! The characters and events were easy to relate to real-life people and events that are going around in the world. For example, when the book talks about the burrowing owls' habitats getting destroyed, many animal habitats are getting destroyed in the real world. The only thing I disliked about this book is that it was a bit too short. This story reminds me of the Holes by Louis Sachar. I also think it would have been nice it Roy moved back to Florida again in the end. I would give this book TWO thumbs up!
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very unpredictable... I really enjoyed Hoot because it is very unpredictable. I looked at the front cover and thought, Hoot, I wonder what kind of book this is. Is it a book explaining owls, where they live, what they eat, etc.? I waited a bit after I got it to read it because I thought it would be boring. How wrong I was! This was a very exciting book in my opinion. It captured my attention almost as soon as I started the book. The only change I might have made would have been to make the epilogue about the future, like what happened in later years. Brief Plot A boy named Roy is living in Florida when something unexpected occurs. On his way to school one day Roy is looking out the window and sees a barefoot boy running like the wind in the opposite direction. The next day Roy gets out of his seat and tries to get off the bus but bumps into a tall girl on the way out. Roy follows the boy to a golf course next to some trees that the boy has disappeared into. But that only leads to snakes hissing around his feet! He gets out of there as quickly as possible. Later in school the tall girl that he had bumped into on the bus confronts him. He finds out her name is Beatrice. He also remembers his bad encounter with a bully named Dana Matherson. Dana had tried to choke him on the bus and Roy had punched his lights out. Throughout the book Roy discovers who the running boy es, stays out of Dana's way, and along with Beatrice, helps the running boy to save helpless animals from great danger. Conclusion Personally I think this book would appeal to anybody who likes a good dose of excitement and humor. If you like to be able to tell what will happen next, this book isn't for you. I think this book deserved its Newberry honour.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...funny and interesting... I was just about to return this book to the library when I decided to read it. It began okay but it soon got more interesting by the moment. Its so funny when there are alligators in the potties and when Roy moons Dana Matherson and when Dana is accused of the vandalism at the Mother Paula Pancake lot. It's interesting when i found out Mullet finger's name and that he was Beatrice's stepbrother. It was also funny when Lonna bought a 700 hundred dollar dress because she thought she was going to be on the Oprah Winfrey Show. It's too bad Leon Leep retired from basketball with a height like his. It was also funny when Officer Deliko fell asleep and his car was spray painted. This book was very funny and interesting especially when all the children tried to stop the Company from building the pancake house and when the actress for Mather Pauls joined too.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...great story... Have you ever found yourself in a big mess because your curiosity got the better of you? That's exactly what this book is about. It's a story about finding friends, facing your fears, and trying to save a species, all rolled into one. Hoot is about a perfectly normal boy called Roy Eberhardt who thinks his life is pretty boring until one day he sees a boy running like crazy, Normal, right? It would be, except for one tiny little thing. He wasn't wearing any shoes. Later when Roy tries to follow the boy he runs into a lot of obstacles including poisonous snakes and golf balls aimed at his head. When he finally finds the boy all he learns is his nickname: Mullet fingers. When Roy hears about some unusually well planned pranks down at the site for a future pancake house where some burrowing owls live, he begins to suspect a connection. Soon Roy finds himself wrapped up in a race to save the owls. If you are looking for a laugh as well as a great story this book is for you.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very clever... This fantastic novel is about a boy named Roy and some school troubles he gets into because he's the new kid at school. Luckily he's managed to make a couple friends, well, the closest things to friends he'll ever get at Trace Middle School. Meanwhile a new Mother Paula's All-American Pancake House is being built. But it's not going to be built any time soon. Every time the construction workers try to start building, there seems to be a problem. One time alligators in the portable potties, another time the seats were taken out of the construction trucks. The worst part is nobody knows who's up to all this. Will Roy and his friends somehow find out what's going on? It's a mystery they'll have to solve. This story has a lot of things kids can learn from, but I think the main thing that the story was to teach kids to stand up for what they believe. And to forgive and forget. These were two things I think that Carl Hiaasen wanted to teach with the story. As a way to teach children, Carl Hiaasen had a very good way of putting it into a story. I think that everybody, including adults and teenagers, could learn something from this book. My two favourite characters were Roy (Main character) and Garret (Friend).I think these were two characters that I thought were most like myself. Just plain ordinary kids. I like stories where you feel like you know the characters. I think I felt like I knew them because of there personalities. There were so many cool creatively described characters too. I could visualise each character perfectly. I could always image it as what it would look like as a movie. This book was very clever but at the same time very, very funny! It was always the clever stuff that was funny. But sometimes it was the dumb stuff that someone would say that made it funny. Sounds weird I know. Have you ever heard something dumb but it was funny? I think this book is for anyone who likes a good laugh, But most of all a mystery. I think it's more of a book for those who like mystery. If I had to rate the humour in the story I would give it a *9!* If I had to rate the mystery in the novel, I would give it a *10!* The problem with the amount of mystery though, was one time it was a bit confusing. If I could change one thing about the book, I would make sure that one part wasn't so confusing. All together I thought the book was fantastic. It was very descriptive. It was fun. It was funny. And full of excitement and mystery! This will be a book that I will read over and over again. There's no better book than a mystery, especially a clever one!
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a lot of comedy... A Newberry Honour Book, an ABC Children's Booksellers Choice, and a New York Times Bestseller, Hoot is about a boy named Roy Eberhardt, who has just moved to Florida. One Monday, while his head was being pushed into the bus window by the school bully, Dana Matherson, he notices a boy with no shoes on running towards the bus stop. Roy was sure that the barefoot boy would catch all kinds of grief from Dana and all the other big kids once he boarded the bus, but that didn't happen. Because the boy kept running - past the corner, past the line of students waiting to get on the bus, past the bus itself. Roy was instantly curious. But when he tries to follow the boy, he gets himself caught with a female soccer jock named Beatrice and a boy named Mullet Fingers in a tale of a future pancake house, a runaway kid, potty alligators, a bully, and friendship. Hoot is definitely one of my favourite books so far. It had a bit of mystery, and a lot of comedy, not to mention the cute owl face on the front cover! I thought that the author could have been a bit more descriptive, as it didn't pull me into the story, but it kept me on the edge of my seat. I liked this book because I felt that it reflected what should be going on in our world. Roy, or better yet, Mullet Fingers, stood up for what they believed in, while nowadays, even though we try not to let it happen, people get away with a lot of things that they shouldn't get away with (especially celebrities!) I have never read one of Carl Hiaasens books before (unless this is his first one?), but with Hoot, I felt that he tried to make a point of standing up for what you believe in, while adding in a good story line, and a lot of comedy. Anybody who likes to laugh will definitely have a great time with this book. When I finished Hoot, I still had one question in my head; how come nobody (especially Roy's parents, who knew all about the problem) bothered to help Mullet Fingers with his mom issue? If I could change the end, it would have been that Beatrice's dad, Leon, would divorce Lonna and take Mullet Fingers in as a son. I mean, Beatrice hated Lonna, Mullet Fingers hated Lonna (which was sad because she was his mom) and Leon was almost always fighting with her. It also didn't seem that Lonna liked any of them either. I think that it would have been better if Lonna had just left. But then, if Carl Hiaasen decides to do a sequel (which I highly suggest), then maybe they will divorce then. If a sequel doesn't come out though, I know that I will still have a hoot of a time reading this book over and over again.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...very descriptive... Hoot, written by Carl Hiaasen, is a tale about a new kid in Florida who doesn't give up on what he believes in. Roy Eberhardt had recently moved from Montana to Florida to find a whole new environment. No mountains, only man-made highway bridges and a boy running down the street with no shoes. Yes, no shoes. Roy was intrigued by this boy, and his curiosity lead him to meet tiny owls, a mad bully, poisonous snakes, but most of all two people who were not going to watch innocent families be destroyed. Roy helped a friend and made others aware of the wrong things that were happening in their community. This novel had its slow moments but had a great morale, to stand up for what you believe in. Carl Hiaasen was very descriptive and painted a visual picture in my mind. I would recommend Hoot to any one who loves adventures or animals. ***
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very interesting... I found this book very interesting. Hoot is about a boy who moves from his home in Montanna to his new home in Florida. At first he hates his new home in Coconut Cove that is until he meets the running boy. The running boy or Mullet Fingers as he is known in the book is a boy who is on a crusade to save some owls home from being turned into a pancake house. Roy somehow becomes invoveled with the boys mission and with the help of the boys stepsister they save the owls. The thing I liked most about this book was the message it was sending to the readers, keep your wild life safe. Even in my home town a lot of the wild life is being killed off by alot of devellopments. The thing I like te least about this book was the charcter the Chuck Muckel. He is so sleesy how could you not hate him. I think that I could most rellate to Roy because just like him I always seem to be undecided. The kind of people that would like to read this book would be those who like mysteries and those who are enviromentalists. hte one thing I would change about the book would be the foreman's attitude. Ifound he was to grouchy. This book reminded me of the movie Hey Arnold th Movie where Arnold and his friends tries to save there neighbourhood from being turned into a mall. Any way thats my opinion on the book. Keep bookworming! V.P.A.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...mystery and fun... I am a girl and I loved this book! It is filled with mystery and fun. There have been strange things happening on the construction site of Mother Paula's All-American Pancake house. Pulled out survey stakes, alligators in the potties, and Officer Delinko must find out who did it and why. Roy is bullied by an 8th grader named Dana when he sees a strange boy running down the street. He meets Beatrice and after a while they become good friends and she tells him a secret about the strange boy he saw. Together Beatrice, Roy and the boy, Mullet Fingers must save the owls from the construction. If you love adventure and you love fun you will LOVE this book! I felt like it was impossible to put the book down. At night I couldn't sleep because I was so excited to find out what would happen next. Roy was my favorite, he was so honest and trustworthy to his friends. I think he would make a great friend! If I were to change one thing about the book I would add a little romance between Roy and Beatrice.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent! Excellent! It was very interesting and enjoyable to read. This book is about a new boy in town named Roy Eberhardt. He meets a runaway boy who tries to save a flock of owls. Roy and Beatrice help the boy keep the young owls safe, and prevent Mother Paula's restaurant from opening on the property. The story sounds boring, but once you start reading, it is a real page-turner. As I was reading, I felt a lot of sympathy toward Roy. Even though I haven't been the new kid on the block as often as he has been, I could imagine how he felt because I tried to put myself in his shoes. I know that I feel this much sympathy toward him because I would hav done the same things he had done if I was stuck in the same situation. I am a very realistic person compared to other kids my age, and I'm almost always serious. I think this is one of the reasons why I enjoyed this book so much. Most of the components of the book were very serious and realistic. Therefore this book would not appeal to people who like practical jokes. Hoot would appeal to many owl-lovers, and people who like adventure books and excitement. A little twist to everything is nice, so I have thought of another ending because the conclusion in the book was obvious, and even expected. Miraculously, the young owls would learn to fly on time, and at Mother Paula's groundbreaking, they would fly away, somewhere far from the urban areas. Then the crew who was involved in the construction of the new Mother Paula's restaurant would be pressed charges on. The story of Hoot reminded me of a movie called Free Willy. This movie is about a boy named Jesse trying to save an orca named Willy. There are also evil businessmen who don't care at all about Willy. In the end, Jesse finally frees Willy with the help of two friends, Randolph and Rae. I would see Jesse as the running boy, Randolph as Roy, and Rae as Beatrice.
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...Loved it... I loved the story line and how she weaved the story! I could not put it down!!
Date published: 2005-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...adventurous and hilarious! A boy with no shoes, a new kid, a series of pranks (such as alligators in the toilet!) pancakes and puny owls.............this book has it all! I was hooked to this book from the very first paragraph......and, it got better and better from there! This story talks about serious matters without being too serious and reflects on our society and what we are doing to nature. In this case, Mother Paula's all American house of pancakes doesn't give a hoot about what happens to the endangered borrowing owls that are about to be......well..... pancaked! I could relate to parts of the story because much of the plot is from a kid's point of view - it is adventurous and hilarious! I couldn't put it down once I started yet, I think this book would be difficult to seuqel because the ending was so complete. A truly unique book - I wouldn't change a thing.....well, except maybe, I would like to see the boy with no shoes (mulletfingers) to have a family. The characters are very well developed and each character has his or her own unique personality; so much so that, at times, I thought I was right there! Hoot is a great book for all ages and for those with a sense of humour and a love for animals. A must read! It truly is a hoot !
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...magnificent... A cacophony of eclectic notions are demonstrated within this magnificent piece of motivational material. Behind its simple, yet intriguing, scheme and plot there is a secretly cultivated idea that brings out the rage and anger in every child. For truly, it is only the children that cry for something that cannot be brought back once destroyed. Roy Eberhardt and his wild friend are determined to protect the imcompetent species of owls, the burrowing owls, even if it means that they must place several poisonous snakes in the perimeters of the soon-to-be-built-pancake-house area where the owls reside and placing 4-foot long crocodiles in the portable potties. For the better of Florida, and the dedication of young teens, this novel shows that if you are eager and determined with a mission in mind, you can definetely make this world a safer place from those ignorant, selfish, economically-centred people. Three shouts for the environment!
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very funny! Hoot is an apt name for Carl Hiassen's 2003 Newbery Honour book. This book is very funny! It included situations like alligators being put down a port-a-potty, police car windows being sprayed black while the officer was sleeping inside and an Amazon like girl who can bite holes in tires! However the first time I read this book, shortly after it made the prestigious Newbery List, I missed a lot of the humour. I think I was so busy trying to solve the mystery of who mullet fingers was and why he was always running. I was concerned as well with the possible extermination of the habitat for the endangered burrowing owls that live on the future site of a Mother Paula's Pancake House. The plot actually does not seem ripe for humour, the main character, unfortunate Roy Eberhartdt has moved at least 10 times that he can remember. He had to leave the rugged beauty of Montana to move to flat, featureless Coconut Grove, Florida. Roy thinks Florida is an armpit whose heat and humidity will suck the very meat out of his lungs. He is bullied unmercilessly by the moronic giant Dana Matherson and the toughest girl in school seems to be after him as well. Roy is a resilient kid who is more concerned with helping the mysterious mullet fingers in his quest to be concerned about being bullied. He gradually learns to appreciate the hidden beauty of Coconut Grove and the book has a upbeat mostly satisfying ending. The only part I would change if I could, is the fate of Napolean Bridger aka Mullet Fingers. His uncaring Mom sent him off to military school and when he ran away, she threatened to have him put in a foster home, if he tried to come home. Even at the end of the book, when he manages to save the home of the burrowing owls, he has no home of his own. This book would appeal to kids in grades 5 and up. If you like Hoot, you should try Linda Bailey's Stevie Diamond mysteries or the Dinah Galloway mysteries by Melanie Jackson. These are both great mystery series set in Canada with a great mixture of humour and mystery. Try them, you'll like them!
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...good book... Roy Eberhardt and his family moves around a lot. His current home is in Coconut Cove, Florida. School introduces him to Beatrice Leep a.k.a. Beatrice the Bear, a wild, rough girl who later becomes Roy's friend. While Roy was riding the school bus home one day, he saw a shoeless boy running at top speed. When curiosity gets the better of him, Roy followed the mysterious boy the second time he saw him. But a golf ball interrupts him when he crosses a golf course during his frantic chasing. Leaving him with a big bruise and questions unanswered. Later, through Beatrice, Roy learns that the running boy is her stepbrother, who ran away from a military school that he was sent to. He now lives in an abandoned ice cream truck and is nicknamed Mullet Fingers by Beatrice. Meanwhile, Coconut Cove was about to have a new restaurant built, but someone was pulling pranks that included putting alligators in portable toilets and other wild things. Which left the constructors off schedule. When Mullet Fingers takes Roy to the construction site and shows him that there were tiny burrowing owls living on the site, he was amazed and bewildered. Roy now understands that if there was going to be a restaurant build, then the burrowing owls will die and the constructors weren't doing anything to prevent that. It turns out that Mullet Fingers was the one who put the alligators in the toilets and all the other things to cause delays, he was hoping that maybe the company would give up and build it somewhere else. Roy didn't think that would work, so he decides to help him. In the end, Roy manages to convince some of the students in his school, and together they sent the company packing and building their restaurant somewhere else. People may think that all run away kids are selfish and mean, but in this book, it tells of one that's trying to save some burrowing owls. Even if he's doing it illegally, it still shows that he cares for nature and is willing to face the consequences of sacrificing his freedom. What I think is interesting about this book is its plot. How it is about burrowing owls and contradicted kids trying to save them. The crazy characters were fun to read about, too. I have never read anything like it. I didn't really like the beginning of the book, because I don't really get excited over reading about new kids getting bullied, so I think that Roy shouldn't have been bullied. But in the end, what Roy did to that Dana Matherson was pretty clever. All in all, this is a good book and I'm glad I read it.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wow! Wow! That's the one and only word I used when I finished the book, Hoot . Hoot wasn't like all the other books I have read. I didn't have a clue of what the book was about, except owls, until I read every last word. It was so great that the kids cared about those owls, and were able to help all they could. My favourite part of the book was when Roy stood in front of the head hiding in the dirt, which was Mullet Fingers' head, and every single kid in the crowd, including Mother Paula, was singing, This land is your land . It was great to read a book about people who care about nature and it's wonders, other than video games and skateboarding. This book also had mystery, like when Roy was trying to figure out who the shoeless boy was and why he was running. It also had danger, like when the hooded figure pulled out those cottonmouth Florida snakes right in front of Roy. It was really adventurous too like when they were rushing Mullet Fingers to the hospital because of a vicious dog bite, from the guard dogs, while trying to feed the tiny owls at the construction site. I think Beatrice was really courageous. She loved her stepbrother, and was behind him one-hundred percent. I really look up to her. I also admire Roy's courage to stand up for himself against all of the bullies he had to face in all the years he moved, especially Dana Matherson. Now, when I'm talking about Officer David Delinko, from the Coconut Cove Safety Department, he wouldn't be described as the brightest egg in the carton, but he did manage to help catch Dana Matherson, in his so-called vandalism of Mother Paula, didn't he? He really wanted to prove himself to the captain, the sergeant, and Councilman Bruce Grandy, and he managed to help catch the Mother Paula vandal, so I really believe that he cared about his job. Most people say a certain book reminds them of something that happened to them in life, or a TV show or movie. Well, I think that this book is very unique and doesn't compare to anything in my opinion. Since the kids at Trace Middle School succeeded in their protest with the owls, the kids now have the courage and determination to never give up on what they believe could be changed. However, they still found out what Mullet Fingers' real name was (Napolean Bridger), he was never seen again. I would have liked to see what happened to Napolean, but it was an excellent book anyway. I think I would have ended the book by arresting the mother and letting Napolean find his real father. When I write short stories, I like to leave it at a suspenseful moment in case there's a sequel. I recommend this novel to everyone. I hope you have a wonderful time reading it, because I sure did.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an awesome read... How many times in your life have you heard the truthful saying Don't judge a book by its cover ? However, sometimes, judging a book by its cover may end you up in an awesome read. Trust me, because while browsing the shelves at the local bookstore, a certain cover caught my eye. The lime green spine and the crayon box blue front with geometrical shapes creating the effect of an owl seemed to jump out at me. As I went to go pay for the book, I had no idea that I was about to buy a ticket to an adventure of a lifetime! Author Carl Haaisen creates a great plot in his novel simply titled HOOT. Roy, one of the main characters, has played the role as the ˜new kid before, so he knows being the target for bullies is part of the job when his family arrives in Coconut Cove, Florida. While Dana, the perfect poster child of one of those punk kids , is pressing the new kid's head into the window on the way to school on the bus, Roy spots a boy running fiercely down the road without any shoes on. Knowing that the kid doesn't attend Trace Middle School and appears to be too young to attend high school, Roy is determined to find this unknown boy and learn his story. With a few obstacles along the way, Roy meets the runaway boy through Beatrice, a soccer star who also attends Trace Middle School. Known only as Mullet Fingers , a nickname given to him by Beatrice, his stepsister, because he can catch fish named mullets using only his hands, the boy has a mission. He's self-appointed to stop the construction of Mother Paula's Pancake House . Why, you ask? Just take a look in the burrows scattered along the construction site and you'll spot tiny burrowing owls. Once the bulldozers start up, the burrows will be filled, locking the petite owls to die underground. While Roy has teamed up with Beatrice and Mullet Fingers, things for Curly, a foreman managing the future site of the pancake house, haven't been very good. There's been someone sneaking over to the site to pull out stakes, put alligators in the port-a-potties, throw poisonous snakes over the grounds and more. Even Officer Delinko's watchful eye doesn't stop the vandal from his tricks. I must say that the book met all the standards for ˜wonderful . HOOT was interesting, humorous, had great descriptions and all the characters were amazingly realistic. I found it neat how the author showed both sides of the story through the twenty-one chapters and how everything comes together for an eventful and gripping finale. I enjoyed the way Carl Haaisen educated readers about the borrowing owl, an endangered animal that is native to British Columbia. I'd recommend HOOT to everyone who likes reading and anyone whose enjoyed Farley Mowat's Owls In the Family or There's an Owl in the Shower written by Jean Craighead George and Mr. Christine Herma Merril.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hoot is a hoot. Hoot is a mystery/adventure book; complete with everything I could want in a novel. It is two story lines that twist and change into one fantastic ending. The first plot kicks off with the new kid, Roy. Roy has just moved into small town Coconut Cove, Florida, where there's only one school that kids his age could attend. So, Roy is surprised to see a shoeless kid running full speed away from the school one Monday morning. Roy decides to investigate, and finds himself in a whole lot of trouble! Meanwhile, vandalisms are taking place at a construction site, delaying a project to open a new pancake house. The vandalism gets worse as the ground breaking ceremony approaches. Is someone trying to stop the new pancake house from opening? Why? What has Roy and the shoeless boy got to do with all this? I don't think there was anything I disliked about this book. It kept me guessing until the end. I love books like that. There isn't a thing I would change about this book's creative characters, or mysterious climaxes! In other words, Hoot is a hoot. I think this novel would appeal to anyone who likes a good mystery - someone who likes to predict what will happen next (like me!) When I tried to foretell the ending of this story, I was completely wrong! This is why I liked it so much. If I were to change anything about this book, it would be the summary that's on the inside cover. It lead me to thinking it wasn't my type of book. I read the book because of how much a friend loved it. If it were up to me, that summary wouldn't be there. I find a lot of summaries on books to be the same way. This book is unique in almost every way. I'm kind of hoping it won't be turned into a movie. It would spoil it for anyone who hasn't read the book. Also, my experience is that on average, books are better anyway. Carl Hiassen did a great job on this book. This example of a one-of-a-kind adventure left me hanging, and hoping that Mr. Hiassen will write another kids book soon!
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...amazing adventure... Hoot is an amazing adventure. I love it. I could read it a million times with out getting bored. The main idea of the story is Roy, Beatrice and Mulletfingers are trying to save the owls that have their den in a construction site. If the people keep on building the owls will die! Mulletfingers cares about the owls the most so he puts alligators in the porta-potties and other pranks too. Even though it's a boy book I loved it and I reccomend it to anyone!
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...quirky and engrossing... Hoot is hilarious! Roy is a middle school loner who just moved to Florida from Montana. He is still adjusting to Florida's unique climate, when he becomes embroiled in a deliciously, offbeat mystery. While attempting to literally duck the school bully, who has it in for him, Roy hooks up with the barefoot boy . What follows is an adventure rife with original and wacky characters. From greedy corporate vice-presidents to not-too-bright local cops, Carl Hiaasen's characters are quirky and engrossing. His descriptions of south Florida's flora and fauna are vivid. As Roy grows to love his new surroundings, he quickly realizes that taking a stand for what you feel is right is not easy. This pro-environmental tale is a rollicking ride right up to the last page!
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...fun to read... This is the first book I've read by Carl Hiaasen, and I must say it is a very different writing style. It's humorous and interesting, making it fun to read. Carl Hiaasen is a very creative and humorous writer. I think if she fixes up this book a bit and make it a bit more sensible, she'll have something amazing. I recommend this book to people who are looking for something different and interesting, and like a bit of humor.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...best book... This book is the best book in the whole wide world. Harry Potter isn't as good as Carl Hiassen's Hoot. I can't wait till I can get my hands on another one of Carl Hiassen's books. And I bet if you read Hoot you'll feel the same way after you're done reading it. Everyone should read this book. I was sad when Hoot ended.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I loved this book! Hoot was a great book! my friend had bought it for me. I started to read it and i couldent put it down. I love mystery books. I especially liked Hoot! I also like other books by the same author.
Date published: 2005-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...interesting... Hello! Kinetic Kait here. Hoot is an interesting book about a boy named Roy. Roy Eberhardt has grown up in many different places. But Florida is the strangest one yet. With bullies around every corner, Roy has to learn how to save his own skin as well as the burrowing owls. The owls live in tunnels underground, and are cute and harmless. When Roy learns their home is to be turned into the new Mother Paula's Pancake House, he is outraged. Then, one day on the bus to school, he sees a boy running along with no shoes, and not going in the direction of any school. The next time he sees him, he follows him and learns his nickname Mullet Fingers. But that's all. The boy's mysterious past, and true identity remains a secret. Meanwhile, he makes a new friend, Beatrice. They form an alliance, and Roy gets caught up in her secret world. The strange boy is linked to her, and both are doing all they can to save the owls. Now Roy must solve his bully problem, find out who the strange boy is, and make a very important decision. Although Beatrice and Mullet Fingers are ruining the construction site's equipment, and detain the construction for a good reason, it's still against the law. Roy must choose between what his heart wants to do, and what his brain wants to do. Will he make the right choice? I liked how Roy chose to try and save the burrowing owls, because their life is worth the same as ours is. It's cool how he was brave enough to stand up and say, you can't do this, it isn't fair. He also shows us that bullies don't have to control us; we can stand up and fight them. Hoot is about a boy discovering that what is declared allowed by law, isn't always what's right. And that you have to stand up for what you believe in, even if it's hard. Everyone's life is worth the same value, no matter how small they may seem. Roy also learns that friends come from strange places, and you should always be true to your heart.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...so amazing... This book was so amazing. Carl Hiassen has found a way of writing books that any kid who has gone through being pushed around or teased feel like everything will be ok. In the story Roy makes new friends, faces his enemies and discovers more about himself. A must read book!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A REAL HOOT! A REAL HOOT! Enter a mystery with a fraud farting champion, toilet trained alligaters- this book will crack you up... into a million pieces. The book great for people with a weird and adventurous side.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...great book... Hoot is a great book. It's got all of the qualities of a great book. It's funny, it's got a great plot, climax and storyline, and it's an adventure/mystery story. You can also learn a lot from this book. For example, you can learn to stand up for yourself and your beliefs, you can learn that not everyone will clue into your point as quickly as you would like, and that being a ˜nuisance like Beatrice's brother, doesn't solve your problem, but only delays the situation. The book is about a boy (Roy) who moves to Florida. In his area they are planning on building a pancake house, but on the piece of land, there are burrowing owls. When the company does the groundbreaking, they'll kill all the burrowing owls, and its a law not to harm this endangered species. It's up to Roy and his friends to make a plan to save the owls! My favorite part of this book was when Roy and other kids from the school protested against the makings of the Mother Paula's All-American House of Pancakes. I liked that part because the whole story was building up to this part-it's the climax of the story, and it was pretty funny. The kids made a big difference to the owls-the difference between life and death. On a scale from 1-10, this book is a 10. I'd recommend this book to everyone I knew. I would say this book is for the ages 10+, just because of the level of reading, kids 7-9 would probably enjoy the story, too. I enjoyed reading this book so much. I would read it again and again, and lend it to my friends. It's so much fun to read!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...really good... this book is really good because in the begining, carl hiassen kinda has few different ideas and he keeps jumping on conclusion to conclusions but near the end the ideas all meet up. like the construction site it dosent relate to roy at all and at the end roy saves the the owls. when in first read the begging i was woundering why the title was hoot. cause hoot dosent talk about a boy and his family or friends. I felt this book is really good. this book is kind of like flipped by wendilin van draanen
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...pro-environmental... Hoot by Carl Hiaasen is a fictional story set in Florida, U.S.A. In the beginning we meet Roy Eberhardt, the new kid at Trace Middle still brooding about his old home in Montana. Bullied by the meanest boy in school, Roy is convinced that nothing good or interesting could happen in Florida until one morning, he spots a strange, shoeless boy running past the bus stop. Intrigued by the strange blonde, Roy attempts to uncover the story behind him. However, the athletic and intimidating Beatrice Leep, who seems to know more about the runner than she lets on, warns him to mind his own business. As Roy unravels this mystery, he realizes that the runner may have something to do with the current acts of vandalism at the site of the future pancake house. Before long, Roy finds himself joined in a fight against greedy developers who threaten the homes of innocent animals. One reason I like this book is because it contains many good themes. One is that you shouldn't hide from bullies, but confront them. For example, when Beatrice Leep threatened Roy in the hallway, instead of hiding, Roy went to her and talked to her. As a result, Beatrice and Roy eventually became good friends. Roy also confronted the school bus bully, Dana Matherson and although he couldn't gain his friendship, Roy avoided hiding from Dana for the rest of the year. Another theme is that changes happen and you must accept them. Roy was so upset about moving from Montana that he wasn't really giving Florida a chance. However, as the story developes, Roy realizes that moping around is fruitless and he should accept the things he can't change. Thirdly, Hoot encourages kids that you should stand up for what you believe in, no matter what the odds. When Roy discovers why the strange boy is involved in the vandalism, he sees that the boy won't ever give up, even though it's him against an entire corporation. When I read this book, I couldn't put it down. I love how Hiaasen connected Roy's searches for the running boy and the vandalism of the pancake house site. I also liked how he portrayed Dana: stupid, slow, and fat. It made Dana seem less threatening, though still very powerful. This book encourages kids to stand up for what they believe in and not to be afraid of speaking up. I would recommend this book to kids age twelve or thirteen or anyone who wants a good laugh. Overall, Hoot was a great, pro-environmental book.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...mysterious and adventurous... A boy named Roy gets mixed up in a fight to save lives, owls' lives to be precise. The book was full of action and when Roy finds out that the girl named Beatrice has a stepbrother that doesn't wear any shoes and runs everywhere; he tries to catch this flying kid. He ends up helping this daredevil out in countless ways including giving him shoes, giving him his identity when he needed medical attention. Roy also gave an idea to Mullet Fingers so that he could save the small burrowing owls without getting himself landed in juvenile hall. The owls were in the ground of the future Mother Paula's All-American House of Pancakes. Roy had found out that the files that gave permission to cover up the dens of the owls were mysteriously missing. Either someone had taken them out of the file or there were never any to begin with. If they took a picture of the owls, they could show it to the president or the vise-president of the company, showing them they couldn't bulldoze the lot because the owls were protected under certain laws saying that you cannot cover up their dens if they are still being used. Unfortunately when Roy looked at the pictures in front of everyone to show the vise-president, they were only a thumb, a foot and a little white speck of feathers on the side of the picture. After the disappointment of not being able to save the owls, all of a sudden, Mullet Finger's head popped out of an owl burrow and he threatens the vice-president to not come near him or else he would dump a pail full of deadly snakes- which were actually only rubber snakes that he was pretending were deadly. The vice-president found out but Roy ran up to stop him from trying to dig Mullet Fingers out of the burrow. Beatrice came along side him and then all the kids that attended came and formed a circle blocking the vice-presidents way. It ended up that the owls were saved and the company, punished. This book was mysterious and adventurous. Anyone who likes books like that would like it. I'm a girl and I even found it exciting. If I could change one thing about the book, I would've Mullet Fingers being reunited with his stepfather and his stepfather would divorce his wife but keep Mullet Fingers (This would also be the new ending). I've never read a book like this one so I couldn't think of another book, movie or show that was like it. I liked how it was really mysterious and you never knew what was going to happen next but I disliked that Mullet Fingers wasn't trusting enough to give Roy his name, even after Roy helped him. I could relate to only one thing in the book, that I love animals and I would do anything to save them, but not by vandalism. All in all, this was an exceptional book!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...wild thrilling adventure... This book was a wild thrilling adventure, full of heroes your bound to cheer for and villians your rooting against. A great tale of owls,alligators,running boys and school bullys as one kid tries to make a difference and ends up making a friend!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...slow... Hoot, by Carl Hiassen, is for young readers who like animals, specifically birds. I found the plot slow, with too much detail. Of course, I'm an action booklover who prefers a book that jumps from one exciting event to another. Hoot is about a boy named Roy who has moved from his beloved home in Montana to Florida. It is the tenth time he has moved. Roy finds Florida dull until he gets caught up with the 'running boy', Beatrice the Bear, the hulking Dana Matherson and the war between the owls and Mother Paula's Pancake House. On the other hand there is a policeman who is after them as well as a mean foreman named Curly. Hoot reminds me of the many books about people protecting the eviroment. One thing I like about this book is the irony like when the bald foreman called himself 'Curly'. If I could change one thing in this novel it would be to add more action. However for those who love the enviroment this book is a must.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...heart-warming... This happens to be one of those rare books that will make you laugh out loud, and everybody can always use a good laugh. Hoot follows the adventures of a young boy as he battles a bully, makes new friends, and works to save some burrowing owls from a future development by a massive franchise. It has a wacky, yet lovable, set of characters that range from an ambitious young policeman to a boy with no name that doesn't attend school. It was wonderful how there were two or three parallel stories (Roy and Dana; Roy, Beatrice, and Mullet Fingers; and Curly and Officer Delinko) that all were brought together in the end. The book peaked my interest and concern, because being a hiker; I love nature and animals, and was truly anxious about the outcome of the owls. Like Roy, I was torn between my brain and my heart. I was worried about Roy and Mullet Fingers getting in trouble with the law, and yet also I was hoping for them to succeed in saving the owls. I felt it was too bad at the end that Mullet Fingers wasn't able to reunite with his family, or at least stay in Coconut Cove and be Roy's friend. Maybe Leon could've divorced Lonna and lived with Beatrice and Napoleon. The ending given, of course, is much more realistic, and in a way, it's better for Mullet Fingers to live away from his mother and to be out in nature. This book with its wacky pranks and characters is extremely humorous, and in the same respects, the motivation behind the pranks makes it heart-warming. Honestly, if my mom read the part where all the kids join hands and sing This Land is Your Land , she would've cried with happiness. Even above and beyond that, though, Hoot is inspiring, and shows you that you should stand up for what is right, and what you believe in.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...crazy adventure... This book is about a twelve year old boy named Roy.Roy lives in florida with his parents.when a mother Paulas pancake house moves into coconut cove.there building puts a family of burrowing animals in danger,Roy,and his friends Beatrice and Mullet fingers get swept up in a crazy adventure to protect the owls. Roy's adventures include vandailism,kiddnapping,lying,stealing and many more. This book is a feel good story were good triumphs over evil,bad guys are exsposed and friendships prove stronger than anything. I would recommend this book to people who like mysteries and happy endings. I would give this book a nine out of ten.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...somewhat boring... This book was okay I like how it was funny but i didn't like how it was somewhat boring. The main character is Roy and some other main characters are Beatrice and Beatrice's stepbrother. Beatrice's stepbrother ran away from his home and lives in a junkyard in a old ice cream truck. The book was about saving burrowing owls that lived underground and people were going to put up a restuarant and bulldose over the owls so the owls would die allthough people that were putting up the building didn't know about the burrowing owls that lived underground. Roy and his friends did save the owls and they didn't put up the building after all but they did find a new place for the resturant to go with no owls under the ground!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a gripping story... This book has a gripping story just waiting to unfold. Roy is a new kid in Florida who goes to Trace Middle. He has to face many challenges like bullies, or struggling to find friends but, his story has many solutions. A bully called Dana Matherson is physically assaulting him but , this turns out to have helped him because during the assult he spots a boy running faster than any one he has ever seen. One day he sees this boy again but fails to catch him because a golf ball hit him on the ear. Now I have to introduce two new character, Officer Delinko and Curley. Officer Delinko is a young cop trying to move higher in the police department, and Curly is a Supervising Engineer trying to stop a vandal who is messing up the scheduled time to build the Mother Mary's All American Pancake House. All of the lives of these people meet after Roy finds out who the boy is (Beatrice's stepbrother). Mullet Fingers turns out to be the vandal who does many stupid, but funny pranks, like taking out the scurvy sticks and filling the holes or even filling the port-a-potties with crocks. Curly and the Officer one night find Dana breaking into the trailer that Curly was at because Roy told him there were cigarettes in there. They arrest Dana thinking he was the vandal and send him to juvenile hall. In the end of the book it turns out that Mullet Fingers (Beatrice's stepbrother) was doing all this because of some rare burrowing owls. All of Roy's and B's friends and a few other people joined to fight the management at the Pancake House because they where going to kill all of the owls. Then the Pancake House made front page in the newspaper. At the end of all this they win the fight and the owls are safe agan. I can relate to Roy in many ways, Roy had a big problem with bullies, and I have been called so many names it is hard just to list 20. Roy also has moved a lot, I lived in Houston, Texas for six years and then moved to Calgary it is very had to move because of a lot of things. Roy will stand up for what he believes in and so will I. This author has a talent shared by few. He can express emotion so well. This was one of the hardest books to let go of . Because of that it only took me three days to read. I would recommend this book to all readers. It moved me by showing me to stand up for what I believe in and never give up. I also have a confession to make, people always say don't judge a book by its cover, well I did, and was I so wrong.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very good... Imagine putting your whole self at risk by vandalizing property, putting crocodiles in construction workers Porta Potties , and taking off all the seats on some rusty, old bulldozers! All for some pop-can-sized owls that don't even know the difference between the good and the bad guy. That is the risk that a boy takes in the book ˜Hoot . On the bus to school one day, a boy named Roy discovers another boy named Mullet Fingers. Mullet Fingers is trying to help save some Burrowing Owls (owls that dig holes in the ground instead of living in trees) from dying when a company plans to build a ˜Mother Paula's All American Pancake House on their home. Roy does some research and finds out that it is illegal to build anything on the endangered owl's natural habitat. Roy takes this information to his dad, a lawyer, and shuts down the building of the restaurant on that site. I liked the fact that it proved to kids that they really could make a difference and that adults can make mistakes. I like the author's sense of humour and creativity. I think that Mullet Fingers could have found better ways to help save the owls. Even though he thought he was doing the right thing, vandalizing is just as illegal as building ˜Mother Paula's on Burrowing Owls' homes. If I could rewrite the ending, I would have kept Mullet Finger's identity unknown, like Superman and Spiderman, who are also doers of good. I could relate more to Roy's way of helping the owls because Mullet Fingers' way was clever, but it was still not the smartest way of going about things because it was not the legal way. I think anyone who likes the genres of mystery; adventure or humour would enjoy this book. The author's creativity and wacky situations really pull you in when you start this book because it's not everyday you read a fiction book about owls who are going to be squashed by a restaurant. If I could change one thing about the book, it would be the title, ˜Hoot . I would call the book ˜Mullet Fingers , because it really is about a young boy trying to save owls, not owls trying to save themselves. I thought this book reminded me of the movie, ˜Catch That Kid . In the movie, the main character's dad had leg problems. He needed to have surgery to walk again but the family didn't have enough money ($25,000!). The insurance company was supposed to pay for it, but they didn't. The main character got together with some friends; they were going to rob $25,000 from a bank! I thought it was like the book because, like Mullet Fingers, the kids thought they were doing the right thing but really they were doing as wrong as the insurance company/˜Mother Paula's Restaurant . In conclusion, this book was very good and I will be sure to read it again!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ...hard... It was such a hard book to get into. Even if you had to read it, it would be hard. Some of my friends liked it but i thought it was boring, because i didnt really get it.
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...adventure,mystery and humour... I loved this book because it had adventure,mystery and humour combined all together. Another reason why I liked this book was because it kept you guessing like at first who was the person who was doing the tricks and then if the burrowing owls would be saved. This story told me to respect nature. This story was about a runaway boy , the boy's stepsister and and a boy who becomes the stepsister and the other boy's friend. The three worked together like a team to help save the burrowing owls. The owls lived in burrows where the town was going to make a pancake house. I think if people like mystery or adventure books they should read this book. At first I looked at the cover of the book and it looked pretty boring but then my sister said I had to read it so I did and I really enjoyed it. As the saying goes You can't judge a book by its cover. When I read this book it made me think of a movie and a book. The book was called Booky. It was about a girl who had problems in her live but there was always somthing there to cheer her up again. The movie was called Rabbit-Proof Fence. It was about a girl who was taken away from her family and was taken to a school. She did not like it there so she took her cousin and sister and ran away. They had to cross a desert but only the 2 of them made it. That made me think about the boy with no name. I am sort of like Beatrice because I love sports. I think anyone who gets the chance to read should read this book!!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...SOOO amazing! This book was SOOO amazing! This new kid, who everyone picks on, especially the school bully, notices this strange boy running down the street, wearing no shoes. Well, Roy (the new kid) is intrigued and decides to investigate into this matter. Well, he doesn't know it but this boy would lead him in many adventures, but everything is based around the strange, but rare, burrowing owls, living in a soon-to-become pancake house lot. This book, as I said before, was AMAZING! However, I had to sort-of make myself read it because I found the story, at the beginning, boring, but once I started I couldn't stop, I read until 3:00 am! I would also recomend it to any animal rights activists or just animal-lovers, like me, becuase it will touch your hearts! Also, I realize now that this book is in the Guy Zone but everybody would love it, I'm a girl and I liked it. So I encourage everyone to get out there and read the amzing book...HOOT!
Date published: 2005-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very funny! Roy Eberhardt moved from Bozeman, Montana to Coconut Cove in Florida. A new Mother Paula's All-American House of Pancakes is opening right in Coconut Cove. Soon strange things start happening at the consruction site. Alligators are found in the potties, a police officer's car windows get painted black. Roy soon finds out who is the vandal, and Roy figures out why this person is doing these things. Roy knows he must stop the people from building Mother Paula's Pancake House. But how? Read the story to find out. I really loved this book, because it's very funny!
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ... very unique... This is an excellant book about friendship and caring. It all starts off when Roy Eberhartd moves to Coconut Cove, Florida from Montana. He has to ride the bus to go to school, and on the ride there he sees a boy running with no shoes on! And that leads him to the mystery...There's a Pancake House that's going to be constructed, some people think 'What's the big problem?' Well, it's that the place they're construting is on top of the Burrowing Owls dens! What I liked about this story is that how the author, Carl Hiaasen talked about two different stories then, put the two stories together for the conclusion. I also liked the different personalities of the characters that made the story really good. If I could make up a different ending it would be that all of the 469 mother Paula's Pancake Houses would go out of buisiness. The character that I think I resemble the most is Roy, because he cares about animals, he snowboards, he skateboards, and he cares about his friends...Alot. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes to laugh, and who likes adventure/ comedy books. This is a very unique book that doesn't remind me of anything else. I wouldn't change anything about the book, really, I think that it was really good and that I would recommend it to ANYONE!!!
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...great book! Hoot is a great book! It is full of mystery and you are anxious to see what happens next. Roy, the main character, was very brave and wouldn't give up on his goal even when it was almost hopeless and too late. Mullet Fingers did very dangerous and illegal things just to save the owls. This book holds my interest because it has many plots and sub-plots. These plots all tie together to create a wonderful story. The book also has action and adventure in it. It manages to raise many emotions like feelings of happiness, excitement and worry. Most of all, it makes me laugh a lot! Every part of the book holds my interest, which makes it difficult for me to choose one favorite part. All parts are equally great. That is why I have to say it is one of my favorite books!
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...welcomes a wide audience... 'Hoot' is not a great book, but it is a very good book, as in, if you were to ask me if I wanted to change ANYTHING about this story I don't. This is a book with a most interesting plot and a loveable cast of heroes, and villains you'll love to hate, but the best part about this story is that it welcomes a wide audience; The main character Roy is a very unique hero that a lot of people can relate to, the recklessly righteous 'Mullet Fingers' is the type of character that a lot of young people look up to, and Hiassen's environmentally views is definately one to admire. Granted 'Hoot' is not the best book that I have ever read, but to readers looking for something refreshingly different to educate and entertain themselves with, 'Hoot' is a must read.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...enticing and original plot... Hoot was a very well-written novel with an enticing and original plot. It was about a considerate and environmently-concerned boy nicknamed Mullet Fingers who was determined to stop the construction of 'Mother Paula's', a well-known pancake house. This is because they are planning to build it upon an owl residence. Mullet Fingers tries many tricks, including putting a few crocodiles in the port-o-potties at the site. One day, a curious and mishievious Roy Eberhardt, notices Mullet Fingers running wildly in the streets with no backpack or shoes. He decides to help him with his mission to save the owls. I would recommend this outstanding book to all readers, but especially to animal-lovers. Carl Hiassen has written a touching story that tells the world that one kid can save endangered species. I really enjoyed reading 'Hoot'.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...my favroite book... The 1st time I read 'Hoot' I was sucked to the book I couldnt take my eyes off it ,it was like the book was saying'READ MORE KEEP GOING'and I did ..I read day and night and night and day. my mom wouldn't let me read at dinner so instead I tolled my family a description of what happend every night,I tolled them every little thing that happened, now they dont even have to read the book.I highly sujest 'Hoot' for a summer and in school book.I hope it captures your mind like it captued mine have fun reading oh ya and thanks carl hiassin for writing my favroite book of all time.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! I really enjoyed reading HOOT. I thought about it in a way that after I picked it up I couldn't put it down. I liked the way Roy cared for the boy with no shoes. It was funny the way Roy got back at Dana for picking on him. Beatrice was very strange in the ways she helped Roy,like biting into his bike tire so he wouldn't get blamed for coming home late. I also like the Mullet Fingers did the things to help the little owls to keep their homes from being burried. Like I said,I love this book and I would encourage other young reader to read it.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hoot The best thing about this book was the owls and how the kids worked together to foil the supermarket company from going in and destroying their home. Dana playing tricks, like the crocodiles in the portapotty and painting the police car windows was funny too.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...pretty much liked it... Roy Eberhardt just moved to Florida. On the school bus one day, he sees a running boy with bare feet. A girl at school named Beatrice knows the running boy as well. In fact, he's her brother, Mulletfingers! Meanwhile, Mother Paula's Pancakes is building a restaurant on the territory of the burrowing owls. Mulletfingers does not like that, and he, Beatrice, and Roy go out to save the owls. The part I liked the most was when Mulletfingers went to the creek and caught a mullet with his bare hands. I liked this part because it explained why he was called Mulletfingers, which I found important. The part I disliked was when Roy mooned Dana. I found that sort of rude. I think that the funniest part in the whole book was when Curly, someone who works at Mother Paula's, found alligators in his toilet! A better ending for Hoot would be if Mulletfingers moved all the burrowing owls to Montana and sent Roy with them so he could go back to his home state. Dana, I thought, was a typical bully who smoked, and threatened people to hurt them if they didn't do his homework for him. I think this book would be best for the people who like laughs, nature, mysteries, and victims of bullying. If I could change one thing about this book, it would be the part when Roy mooned Dana, because that was rude. I pretty much liked this book, and thanks for reading my report.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...peculiar but funny... Hoot . When you first read the title you're like huh? What's that all about? I know I was when I first saw it, which is probably what intrigued me to read it. Good thing I did too or I would have missed out on a very peculiar but funny novel, kind of like Roy's situation with Dana. If Dana Matherson wasn't the bully that he was, Roy would have had his nose stuck in a comic book rather than pressed against a bus window, and wouldn't have seen the strange running boy that got his curiosity steaming. Roy, the new kid in Coconut Cove Florida, makes it his business to go out and find out about the odd boy that brings him on a wild adventure including him getting hit with a golf ball, lying about his identity, and provoking a bully all to save some endangering burrowing owls from getting buried. I love the way Hiaasen goes back and forth through the characters confusing you of what you believe the outcome will be. As in most books, all the characters that are introduced are connected in someway so it is interesting to see how the plot comes together to reveal a sensational ending. The characters all have their own unique personalities and are going through different situations that I believe most people who read this book can relate to, or have related to at one time or another. Whether it is not being appreciated by someone, or not loved, or at risk of losing something that is very important to you, we can all relate somehow no matter what age we are. That is exactly the reason why this book can appeal to adolescents, tweens, teens, and adults whether they are male or female. It all depends on how open-minded they are to read new things. As I was reading this book, I realized that because it is so original, I couldn't think of one other book that I have read that is similar to this one. I'm sure there are plenty however; this book takes your mind off of pretty much everything else and leaves you incredibly focused on the plot. When some people are reading books, it is difficult for them to get an image in their head of what they author is describing. With Hoot , the images come to you automatically you don't even have to think you just laugh. Hoot is an incredibly engaging story that is full of humor, courage and bonding friendships. Hiaasen has based his story on many real life and important situations but twisted it into a fictitious adventure that keeps readers hooked like a baited fish. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes to laugh and until Hiaasen's next pro-ecology comedy; I'm going to ribbit until the cows come home. (Those cows can walk awfully slow).
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ...incredibly boring... The book Hoot is about a mysterious and strange boy who is very lonely and runs around the neighbourhood like a maniac, and then another boy discovers that he is lonely and becomes friends with him. I chose the book because it looked interesting but found it incredible boring. I could predict the whole story and my prediction was right. I do not recommend this book for girls but guys might find this hilarious with potty -trained alligators and all.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very...unusual... Even though I'm a girl I thought this book was awesome! Hoot is about a boy named Roy from Texas who, while having his face flattened against a bus window by the school bully, Dana, sees a boy running faster than he could imagine, and without any shoes! His adventure begins when he tries to find out who the boy is. He encounters poisonous, glittery snakes, an even more dangerous soccer player named Beatrice, and a policeman and construction manager trying to find out who keeps sabotaging the construction area. But most importantly he finds the owls, which will be killed if he, Beatrice and the shoeless boy cannot stop the development of Coconut Grove's new pancake house... This is really one of the best books I've ever read. The characters are realistic and very...unusual, but you start to like Roy by the fourth page. You can get mad at Dana, and be intimidated by Beatrice without ever feeling stupid. To repeat the words of billions, it's a real page turner! Seriously, I was up until three o'clock in the morning reading it. I'd say ages 8 and up. This book was kind of dramatic, so anyone younger would be scared or fall asleep. Oh, and if your an owl lover, this is an absolute must.
Date published: 2005-09-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from awsome book!!!!! this book is great if you like suspense and adventure. It is written in a humor sense. The author is very creative in writing to book. Its written very well, and the description makes you feel as if you are in that person's shoes. If you have time, dont miss out on reading this book.
Date published: 2005-03-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great this book was very good. i bought it to do a book report on and i ennded up reading it twice
Date published: 2003-11-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best Book Ever Hey i just finished reading the book hoot and i swear it is the best book in the world!!!!!!!!! Everone should read it!! If you don't it's your loss it's the best!!
Date published: 2003-01-12

– More About This Product –

Hoot

Hoot

by Carl Hiaasen

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 7.62 × 5.2 × 0.7 in

Published: December 27, 2005

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0440419395

ISBN - 13: 9780440419396

Read from the Book

Roy would not have noticed the strange boy if it weren't for Dana Matherson, because Roy ordinarily didn't look out the window of the school bus. He preferred to read comics and mystery books on the morning ride to Trace Middle. But on this day, a Monday (Roy would never forget), Dana Matherson grabbed Roy's head from behind and pressed his thumbs into Roy's temple, as if he were squeezing a soccer ball. The older kids were supposed to stay in the back of the bus, but Dana had snuck up behind Roy's seat and ambushed him. When Roy tried to wriggle free, Dana mushed his face against the window. It was then, squinting through the smudged glass, that Roy spotted the strange boy running along the sidewalk. It appeared as if he was hurrying to catch the school bus, which had stopped at a corner to pick up more kids. The boy was straw-blond and wiry, and his skin was nutbrown from the sun. The expression on his face was intent and serious. He wore a faded Miami Heat basketball jersey and dirty khaki shorts, and here was the odd part: no shoes. The soles of his bare feet looked as black as barbecue coals. Trace Middle School didn't have the world's strictest dress code, but Roy was pretty sure that some sort of footwear was required. The boy might have been carrying sneakers in his backpack, if only he'd been wearing a backpack. No shoes, no backpack, no books-strange, indeed, on a school day. Roy was sure that the barefoot boy would catch all kinds of grief from Dana and the other b
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From the Publisher

A book for young readers. It involves new kids, bullies, alligators, eco-warriors, pancakes, and pint-sized owls. A hilarious
Floridian adventure!

From the Jacket

A book for young readers. It involves new kids, bullies, alligators, eco-warriors, pancakes, and pint-sized owls. A hilarious
Floridian adventure!

About the Author

Carl Hiaasen is the author of many bestselling novels for adults, including Sick Puppy and Basket Case. He also writes a column for the Miami Herald.

Editorial Reviews

“It seems unlikely that the master of noir-tinged, surrealistic black humor would write a novel for young readers. And yet, there has always been something delightfully juvenile about Hiaasen’s imagination; beneath the bent cynicism lurks a distinctly 12-year-old cackle. In this thoroughly engaging tale of how middle schooler Roy Eberhardt, new kid in Coconut Cove, learns to love South Florida, Hiaasen lets his inner kid run rampant, both the subversive side that loves to see grown-ups make fools of themselves and the righteously indignant side, appalled at the mess being made of our planet. The story is full of offbeat humor, buffoonish yet charming supporting characters, and genuinely touching scenes of children enjoying the wildness of nature. He deserves a warm welcome into children’s publishing.”—Booklist

“A wonderful tour-de-force.”—The Boston Globe

“A rollicking, righteous story.”—The Miami Herald

“You don’t have to be a young adult to enjoy it.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Yes, it is a hoot.”—The Washington Post Book World

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12