Household Counts: Canadian Households and Families in 1901 by Peter BaskervilleHousehold Counts: Canadian Households and Families in 1901 by Peter Baskerville

Household Counts: Canadian Households and Families in 1901

EditorPeter Baskerville, Eric W. Sager

Hardcover | April 21, 2007

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The Canadian census taken in 1901 has surprising things to say about the family as a social grouping and cultural construct at the turn of the twentieth century. Although the nuclear-family household was the most frequent type of household, family was not a singular form or structure at all; rather, it was a fluid micro-social community through which people lived and moved. There was no one "traditional" family, but rather many types of families and households, each with its own history.

In Household Counts, editors Eric W. Sager and Peter Baskerville bring together an impressive array of scholars to explore the demographic context of families in Canada using the 1901 census. Split into five sections, the collection covers such topics as family demography, urban families, the young and old, family and social history, and smaller groups as well. The remarkable plasticity of family and household that Household Counts reveals is of critical importance to our understanding of nation-building in Canada. This collection not only makes an important contribution to family history, but also to the widening intellectual exploration of historical censuses.

Peter Baskerville is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Victoria and author of The Bank of Upper Canada. Eric W. Sager is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Victoria and author of Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820–1914.
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Title:Household Counts: Canadian Households and Families in 1901Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.3 × 6.29 × 1.5 inPublished:April 21, 2007Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802038603

ISBN - 13:9780802038609

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Contributors

Introduction
ERICW. SAGER and PETER BASKERVILLE

PART ONE FAMILY DEMOGRAPHY: CANADA, 1901

  1. Transitions in Household and Family Structure: Canada in 1901 and 1991
    STACIE D.A. BURKE
  2. Canadian Fertility in 1901: A Bird’s-Eye View
    PETER GOSSAGE and DANIELLE GAUVREAU
  3. Family Geographies: A National Perspective
    LARRY MCCANN, IAN BUCK, and OLE HEGGEN

    PART TWO URBAN FAMILIES

    1. Family Geographies: An Urban Perspective
      LARRY MCCANN, IAN BUCK, and OLE HEGGEN
    2. Rural to Urban Migration: Finding Household Complexity in a New World Environment
      KENNETH M. SYLVESTER
    3. Family Geographies: Montreal, Canada’s Metropolis
      LARRY MCCANN, IAN BUCK, and OLE HEGGEN

      PART THREE THE YOUNG AND THE OLD

      1. Families, Fostering, and Flying the Coop: Lessons in Liberal Cultural Formation, 1871–1901
        GORDON DARROCH
      2. Canadian Children Who Lived with One Parent in 1901
        BETTINA BRADBURY
      3. Boundaries of Age: Exploring the Patterns of Young-Old Age among Men, Canada and the United States, 1870–1901
        LISA DILLON

      PART FOUR NEW INTERPRETATIONS: FAMILY AND SOCIAL HISTORY

      1. Inequality, Earnings, and the Canadian Working Class in 1901
        ERIC W. SAGER
      2. ‘Leaving God Behind When They Crossed the Rocky Mountains’: Exploring Unbelief in Turn-of-the-Century British Columbia
        LYNNE MARKS
      3. Giving Birth: Families and the Medical Marketplace in Victoria, British Columbia, 1880–1901
        PETER BASKERVILLE

      PART FIVE THE IMPORTANCE OF CULTURAL CONTEXT

      1. Language, Ancestry, and the Competing Constructions of Identity in Turn-of-the-Century Canada
        CHAD GAFFIELD
      2. Constructing Normality and Confronting Deviance: Familial Ideologies, Household Structures, and Divorce in the 1901 Canadian Census
        ANNALEE LEPP

      Index