The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account Of Native People In North America

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The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account Of Native People In North America

by Thomas King

Doubleday Canada | November 13, 2012 | Hardcover

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account Of Native People In North America is rated 3.78571428571429 out of 5 by 14.

WINNER of the 2014 RBC Taylor Prize

The Inconvenient Indian is at once a “history” and the complete subversion of a history—in short, a critical and personal meditation that the remarkable Thomas King has conducted over the past 50 years about what it means to be “Indian” in North America.
 
Rich with dark and light, pain and magic, this book distills the insights gleaned from that meditation, weaving the curiously circular tale of the relationship between non-Natives and Natives in the centuries since the two first encountered each other. In the process, King refashions old stories about historical events and figures, takes a sideways look at film and pop culture, relates his own complex experiences with activism, and articulates a deep and revolutionary understanding of the cumulative effects of ever-shifting laws and treaties on Native peoples and lands.
 
This is a book both timeless and timely, burnished with anger but tempered by wit, and ultimately a hard-won offering of hope -- a sometimes inconvenient, but nonetheless indispensable account for all of us, Indian and non-Indian alike, seeking to understand how we might tell a new story for the future.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.53 × 5.7 × 1.04 in

Published: November 13, 2012

Publisher: Doubleday Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385664214

ISBN - 13: 9780385664219

Found in: History

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Boring I didn't enjoy the style of the writing and felt the book was a bit ask over the place. Wouldn't recommend.
Date published: 2015-10-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Inconvenient Indian This is an amazing book. I love it. Way to go Thomas King. You are an amazing story teller. I read the book and now I am purchasing it in eBook. Thank you and never stop telling the story.
Date published: 2015-09-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enlightening It gave me a knowledge base for future reading. I enjoyed reading history from a different perspective than the one usually presented.
Date published: 2015-08-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Must for anyone who wants to understand Excellent look at the relationship of First Nations people(s) with the colonizers. A must for any (and every) one who wouldnlike to understand how horiibly awful *white man* was (and still is). And yes... I am one of those immigrant settlers who still has much to learn from our Aboriginal hosts.
Date published: 2015-08-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Inconvenient Indian The author, Thomas King, tries to make this post - contact quasi - history entertaining as well as informative (a 'spoonful of sugar ...', etc.) but in so many ways this is a horror story -- or rather, a compilation of horror-story-upon-horror-story. A must read for anyone who claims compassion and humanity!
Date published: 2015-03-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Inconvenient Indian Bought this book out of curiosity and was pleasantly surprised. I knew and loved King's work as storyteller and humorist. He is to be commended on his handling of a difficult issue. Parts of the book are laugh-out-loud funny in addition to being thought provoking. It is a part of history that deserves much more attention than it ever gets in our schools.
Date published: 2015-03-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from I'm sorry I bought the "Inconvenient Indian" I did not like the book, I read it in one hour, always hoping for more information, I may not have understood the whole idea of the interview, it was short, I was really hoping for more.
Date published: 2015-02-17
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Was quite curious - so I bought it. Simply put - this book was not very good. Not particularly insightful - nor particularly well written. A disappointment I'm afraid.
Date published: 2015-02-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hope for the Future? Thomas King has done us all a service in reviewing the history of native peoples in North America in a clear and compelling way. It will take reasonable people of good purpose and determination on both sides to remedy the issues described.
Date published: 2014-08-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Inconvenient Indian This should be on the bookshelves of all North Americans and mandatory reading in schools and history classes. A well written account from a very different perspective than the one we grew up with.
Date published: 2014-04-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Informative but unforgiving I appreciate the breadth of information; sadly, I was unaware of many of the atrocities that occurred in recent times. However, there seemed little in the way of moving forward that I saw as feasible. I don't think this is the fault of the author, but rather the state of of our ineffective laws.
Date published: 2014-03-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dilemma A beautifully clear exposition of relations between Indian and white culture since contact. I learned a lot. Unfortunately no solution to the conflict seems possible and at this stage in the degradation of the planet Is probably moot.
Date published: 2014-03-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Informative read Great information towards the history and present facts of the relationships between Natives and Non-Natives of North America.
Date published: 2013-08-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Like talking to an old friend Thomas King writes the unwritten history and presents it in an easy to read, follow, and understand form. Reading this book is like sitting with an old friend. Also, without intending to, he gives an explanation to the "IDLE NO MORE" movement which is growing across our nation, and the reader learns that our shared history on Turtle Island is not just about one or the other, but about ALL OF US.
Date published: 2013-02-03
Rated out of 5 by from Any Canadian who considers themselves a student of history may want to read the Inconvenient Indian. I love King's writing, his dedication to distinguishing between truth and fiction, as well as to unraveling the Great Man narratives so prevalent in Canadian history texts. Stephen Harper, or his speech writers, might be well advised to study this narration! In the preparation to further fictionalize history as we plant the celebration of 150 years of Canada, this book is a reading requirement.
Date published: 2012-12-29

– More About This Product –

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account Of Native People In North America

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account Of Native People In North America

by Thomas King

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.53 × 5.7 × 1.04 in

Published: November 13, 2012

Publisher: Doubleday Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385664214

ISBN - 13: 9780385664219

Read from the Book

About fifteen years back, a bunch of us got together to form a drum group. John Samosi, one of our lead singers, suggested we call ourselves “The Pesky Redskins.” Since we couldn’t sing all that well, John argued, we needed a name that would make people smile and encourage them to overlook our musical deficiencies.We eventually settled on the Waa-Chi-Waasa Singers, which was a more stately name. Sandy Benson came up with it, and as I remember, waa-chi-waasa is Ojibway for “far away.” Appropriate enough, since most of the boys who sit around the drum here in Guelph, Ontario, come from somewhere other than here. John’s from Saskatoon. Sandy calls Rama home. Harold Rice was raised on the coast of British Columbia. Mike Duke’s home community is near London, Ontario. James Gordon is originally from Toronto. I hail from California’s central valley, while my son Benjamin was born in Lethbridge, Alberta, and was dragged around North America with his older brother and younger sister. I don’t knowwhere he considers home to be.Anishinaabe, Métis, Coastal Salish, Cree, Cherokee. We have nothing much in common. We’re all Aboriginal and we have the drum. That’s about it.I had forgotten about “Pesky Redskins” but it must have been kicking around in my brain because, when I went looking for a title for this book, something with a bit of irony to it, there it was.Pesky Redskins: A Curious History of Indians in North America.Problem was, no one else liked the title. Several people I trust told
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From the Publisher

WINNER of the 2014 RBC Taylor Prize

The Inconvenient Indian is at once a “history” and the complete subversion of a history—in short, a critical and personal meditation that the remarkable Thomas King has conducted over the past 50 years about what it means to be “Indian” in North America.
 
Rich with dark and light, pain and magic, this book distills the insights gleaned from that meditation, weaving the curiously circular tale of the relationship between non-Natives and Natives in the centuries since the two first encountered each other. In the process, King refashions old stories about historical events and figures, takes a sideways look at film and pop culture, relates his own complex experiences with activism, and articulates a deep and revolutionary understanding of the cumulative effects of ever-shifting laws and treaties on Native peoples and lands.
 
This is a book both timeless and timely, burnished with anger but tempered by wit, and ultimately a hard-won offering of hope -- a sometimes inconvenient, but nonetheless indispensable account for all of us, Indian and non-Indian alike, seeking to understand how we might tell a new story for the future.

About the Author

THOMAS KING is one of Canada's premier Native public intellectuals. King was the first Aboriginal person to deliver the prestigious Massey Lectures, and is also the bestselling, award-winning author of six novels, two collections of short stories and two nonfiction books. He won the 2014 Governor General's Award for Literature for his most recent novel, The Back of the Turtle. His non-fiction tour de force, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America won the BC National Award for Canadian Non Fiction and the RBC Taylor Prize, as well as being a finalist for 2015 CBC Canada Reads. He is a recipient of the Order of Canada. He lives in Guelph, ON.

Editorial Reviews

National BestsellerWINNER 2015 – CBC Bookie Awards - Non-FictionWINNER 2014 – RBC Taylor PrizeWINNER 2013 – Canadian Booksellers Association Non-Fiction Book of the YearFINALIST 2014 – Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-FictionFINALIST 2013 – Trillium Award“King is a Canadian icon . . . The Inconvenient Indian is labeled a history book but it is about Canada today. I suggest teachers include a copy in every school classroom. It made me a better Canadian and more compassionate person.” —Craig Kielburger, co-founder of Free the Children, defending The Inconvenient Indian at Canada Reads 2015"Thomas King is funny. And ironic, sarcastic, clever and witty. His writing style is direct, offbeat and accessible. . . . [The Inconvenient Indian is] a riveting, sweeping narrative that illuminates, horrifies, stupefies and educates. This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to better understand the enormous divide that persists between many aboriginals and non-aboriginals." —Edmonton Journal“The Inconvenient Indian may well be unsettling for many non-natives in this country to read. This is exactly why we all should read it. Especially now.” —Vancouver Sun“[The Inconvenient Indian is] couched in a plainspoken forthrightness that shocks as often as it demystifies. . . . It is essential reading for everyone who cares about Canada and who seeks to understand native people, their issues and their dreams. . . . Thomas King is beyond being a great writer and storytelle
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