The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish: Based on a True Story by Jacqueline Briggs MartinThe Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish: Based on a True Story by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish: Based on a True Story

byJacqueline Briggs MartinIllustratorBeth Krommes

Paperback | November 28, 2005

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The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish tells the dramatic story of the Canadian Arctic expedition that set off in 1913 to explore the high north.
Jacqueline Briggs Martin is the author of Snowflake Bentley, winner of the 1999 Caldecott Medal, and The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish, an ALA Notable Book, a Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book, Riverbank Review Finalist, Notable Social Studies Trade book and winner of The Golden Kite Award for Illustration. She grew up on a farm in M...
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Title:The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish: Based on a True StoryFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:48 pages, 11 X 9 X 0.19 inShipping dimensions:48 pages, 11 X 9 X 0.19 inPublished:November 28, 2005Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0618548955

ISBN - 13:9780618548958

Appropriate for ages: 4

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Editorial Reviews

Gr. 2-4. In 1913, a Canadian research boat named Fish became trapped in the ice on an Arctic expedition. Along with a captain, crew, scientists, and explorers, the ship carried sled dogs and some Inupiaq people, including a family with two small daughters on which the story centers. In language as stark and elemental as the landscape, the author of the Caldecott Medal-winning Snowflake Bentley (1998) describes how the group survived using Inupiaq cultural traditions, which are presented in detail reminiscent of the Little House books. Impatient readers unimpressed by survival stories may find these descriptions slow going, but Martin includes details that will fascinate kids (Inupiaq sunglasses--how cool!). The quiet, intriguing language, with a poet''s attention to sound, will lull young ones into the story''s drama, as will Beth Krommes'' captivating scratchboard illustrations, suggestive of Lois Lenski''s work in their rounded shapes and bold lines. With its picture-book format and well-paced chapters, this is a great choice for primary classroom read-alouds. Gillian EngbergCopyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved