Modern Classics Brideshead Revisited Centennial Edition by Evelyn WaughModern Classics Brideshead Revisited Centennial Edition by Evelyn Waugh

Modern Classics Brideshead Revisited Centennial Edition

byEvelyn Waugh

Mass Market Paperback | August 26, 2003

Pricing and Purchase Info

$11.56 online 
$11.99 list price
Earn 58 plum® points

Out of stock online

Not available in stores

about

Charles Ryder, a lonely student at Oxford, is captivated by the outrageous and decadent Sebastian Flyte. Invited to Brideshead, Sebastian’s magnificent family home, Charles welcomes the attentions of its eccentric, aristocratic inhabitants, gradually becoming infatuated with them and the life of privilege they inhabit – in particular, with Sebastian’s remote sister, Julia. But he gradually comes to recognize his spiritual and social distance from them, eventually discovering a world where duty and desire, faith and happiness are in conflict.

EVELYN WAUGH CENTENARY EDITION

Charles Ryder, a lonely student at Oxford, is captivated by the outrageous and decadent Sebastian Flyte. Invited to Brideshead, Sebastian’s magnificent family home, Charles welcomes the attentions of its eccentric, aristocratic inhabitants, gradually becoming infatuated with them and the life of privilege they inhabit – in particular, ...
Loading
Title:Modern Classics Brideshead Revisited Centennial EditionFormat:Mass Market PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 7.07 × 4.36 × 0.75 inPublished:August 26, 2003Publisher:Penguin UkLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0141187476

ISBN - 13:9780141187471

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sublime... “Professional reviewers read so many bad books in the course of duty that they get an unhealthy craving for arresting phrases.” -Evelyn Waugh Evelyn Waugh belonged to the upper-crust of English society, and yet he mocked them. However, his sardonic works are very different from those of his friend and great contemporary Sir P.G. Wodehouse. Wodehouse was funny for the sake of being funny; and unlike Wodehouse, Waugh was never afraid of discussing politics and war – all the grown-up stuff – in his novels. No, he relished it. Satirist he may have been, but he was more scared of the new-world, the world which, according to him had “had ripped up the nourishing taproot of tradition and let wither all the dear things of the world.” However, “Brideshead Revisited” is one of the very few non-satirical works by Evelyn Waugh. Instead, it is a novel which attempts to find a deeper meaning of life. This novel is Waugh’s everlasting glory. It may not be wholly satirical, but Waugh manages to find a right balance between subtle sardonicism of his own philosophies and grown-up magnificence. Our tale is narrated by a middle-aged Charles Ryder, whose regiment is stationed at a Castle during the Second World War. Just after glancing at the fountain, he suddenly recalls that he is at Brideshead, and begins to narrate his experience with an eccentric Catholic family and the long-gone splendour of aristocracy. He remembers the time when he was but a young, slightly-shy student at Oxford and was wholly attracted to a licentious Sebastian Flyte and was soon embroiled with his rather dysfunctional family. Waugh once claimed, “One forgets words as one forgets names. One's vocabulary needs constant fertilizing or it will die.” Perhaps nothing, I mean nothing stands out more in this novel than eye-blindingly sparkling prose. To give you a little dose of Wavian English: “Here under the high and insolent dome, those coffered ceilings; here, as I passed through those arches and broken pediments to the pillared shade beyond and sat, hour by hour, before the fountain, probing its shadows, tracing its lingering echoes, rejoicing in all its clustered feats of daring and invention, I felt a whole new system of nerves alive within me, as though the water that spurted and bubbled among its stone, was indeed a life-giving spring.” This is a novel which will never be deprived of its vitality and beauty.
Date published: 2012-05-12