The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency: A No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Novel (1) by Alexander Mccall SmithThe No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency: A No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Novel (1) by Alexander Mccall Smith

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency: A No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Novel (1)

byAlexander Mccall Smith

Paperback | February 6, 2003

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THE NO. 1 LADIES’ DETECTIVE AGENCY - Book 1

Fans around the world adore the best-selling No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series and its proprietor, Precious Ramotswe, Botswana’s premier lady detective. In this charming series, Mma  Ramotswe—with help from her loyal associate, Grace Makutsi—navigates her cases and her personal life with wisdom, good humor, and the occasional cup of tea.

This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith’s widely acclaimed The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series tells the story of the delightfully cunning and enormously engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives.” Immediately upon setting up shop in a small storefront in Gaborone, she is hired to track down a missing husband, uncover a con man, and follow a wayward daughter. But the case that tugs at her heart, and lands her in danger, is a missing eleven-year-old boy, who may have been snatched by witchdoctors.

The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency received two Booker Judges’ Special Recommendations and was voted one of the International Books of the Year and the Millennium by the Times Literary Supplement.
ALEXANDER MCCALL SMITH is the author of the international phenomenon The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series, the Isabel Dalhousie Series, the Portuguese Irregular Verbs series, the 44 Scotland Street series and the Corduroy Mansions series. He is professor emeritus of medical law at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and has se...
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Title:The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency: A No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Novel (1)Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 8 × 5.17 × 0.71 inPublished:February 6, 2003Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1400034779

ISBN - 13:9781400034772

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING! Loved every minute of this book Love this whole series, so entertaining!
Date published: 2017-10-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Lovely! A lovely read and the beginning of a highly enjoyable series!
Date published: 2017-08-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My favourite! Easy to read, but not fluffy, and perfect to read with a cup of redbush (roobois) tea. Good mysteries, good background to the stories.
Date published: 2017-04-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The first one It is always difficult to predict the success of a book. Who could have guessed that this book would start a series of books that is still very popular, some 15 years later. The first time, the book was sold out, so I read the second one first! The charm of Mma Ramostwe, her shoes-loving assistant, the setting, the secondary characters, and the wonderful writing skills of Alexander McCall Smith would make anyone fall for this book.
Date published: 2017-04-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Cute and quick The main character is quire likable and down-to-earth. The story is light. I just couldn't really get into it.
Date published: 2017-03-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A window into another world More similar than you'd expect, these tales based in Botswana are beautifully and thoughtfully written.
Date published: 2017-02-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this series These books are funny and heart warming, an absolute delight.
Date published: 2017-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Revelation As many reviewers have said, this is one of the most heartwarming novels I have read in a long, long time - which is an odd thing to say about a so-called 'detective novel'. Precious Ramotswe is the sort of private detective we all would want to deal with if we were in a 'delicate' situation: kind, understanding and above all, highly intelligent. McCall cloaks her intelligence under layers of simplicity and Miss Marple-like village parallels but it shines nonetheless, as does her dignity, patience and humour. I wish I knew her. Her secretary/assistant Grace is prickly and difficult but she also seems to have the wisdom of Africa at her disposal when she puts her mind to it and between them they make an unbeatable team. Mma Ramotswe is NOT a character you will ever forget nor will you want to. This novel left me smiling and at peace in my heart - I wish I could travel to Botswana and meet the people there. McCall-Smith is a genius and I have reread this many, many times. The people are my friends. Can't recommend it enough to anyone looking to calm down in a world full of insanity, misery and hatred for other people. Try listening to Precious and you will learn deep wisdom about the Earth and its peoples: maybe even yourself. Not for true mystery buffs but more philosophical and slow moving on a Sunday afternoon. She makes me feel serene and I have a calm smile as I type this - just thinking of my friends in Africa.
Date published: 2016-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Alexander McCall Smith is an amazing author This is one of several great series from Alexander McCall Smith. The characters are wonderful and the writing is delightful.
Date published: 2016-11-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Like a good cup of tea Settle in with a hot cup of tea and read this delightfully charming story. It's great to see what life is like in Botswana from the eyes of the "traditionally built" Mma Ramotswe.
Date published: 2014-11-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The number 1... I remember the HBO series of the same name. The book I just read is far better!
Date published: 2014-07-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The no1 Ladies Detective Agency I actually saw the made for cable version first, then Read the books. I highly recommend the series.
Date published: 2013-04-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Delightful This book was very well-rounded. It had love, mystery and possibly murder? ;) The author is detailed but not too detailed to the point of boredom. I recommend this book!
Date published: 2012-02-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Light read - not heavy at all I really liked reading this book - He is a good writer - very detail in his explanations. A nice read - not heavy and demanding.
Date published: 2008-07-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Mma Ramotswe is my hero! The most wonderful aspect of this novel is its heroine, Mma. Precious Ramotswe. She has somehow managed in Gabarone, Botswana to cultivate the common sense of Miss Marple, the good manners of Hercule Poirot and the savvy and discretion of Hetty Wainthrop. Then there are the sort of cases that come her way and the people she encounters, but to get into detail might ruin it for someone else. My advice is to buy or borrow the bookand settle down with a nice hot cup of bush tea (this really heightened the experience for me - it's known as Rooibos or Ruibos in North America!).
Date published: 2007-11-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good Summer Read Somewhat darker in tone than subsequent titles we are however swept along in this laid-back land where nothing really "bad" happens. These books would make a good summer read.
Date published: 2006-06-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Precious book! This a very cute, lighthearted mystery book introducing the wonderfully brilliant Mma Precious Ramotswe . Her reflections on her life plus determination to succeed in business and solving mysteries has me rooting for her. Her philosophy and attitude towards life is so refreshing and so down to earth. Mr. McCall-Smith has done a brilliant job of introducing the African Miss Marple. His Bostwana is very much Christie's St. Mary Mead and I look forward to reading more of his books.
Date published: 2005-04-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An Excellent Read! I spent part of last summer in Africa. My friend whom I was visiting at the time raved about the Alexander Mccall Smith Mma Ramotswe novels. I read The No.1 Ladies Detective Agency and Tears of the Giraffe while in Africa and was extremely pleased to be able to access the remainder of the series in Ottawa. The stories offer insightful, delightful, heart-warming glimpses of Africa through Mma Ramotswe and a variety of other characters. Hopefully, Mccall Smith will continue this tradition by treating us to a sixth novel!
Date published: 2004-12-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful, little book This book was such a pleasure to read. It is so full of images of the beauty and people in Botswana, a country which I knew very little about. The main character is funny and smart and sensible. A great relaxing read.
Date published: 2004-07-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Did not know what to expect, found it enjoyable I found this book an easy read - a simple narrative that hid layers of sophisticated insights. The descriptions of Africa were detailed enough so as to bring the images to mind, but without overshadowing the story (as some descriptive novels do). Precious is a lovely heroine to root for: she's smart, kind-hearted, full of integrity, brave, simple, insightful, thoughtful, loving and she's lived through hard times - but chooses to make the world a better place. I'm definitely looking forward to reading the next few books about her adventures!
Date published: 2003-12-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Different This book was much different from other mystery novels, and fiction novels that I have recently read. It was an enjoyable and quick book to get through. I guess my only criticism would be that sometimes it felt like you were reading a book for teenagers.
Date published: 2003-09-22

Read from the Book

CHAPTER ONEThe DaddyMma Ramotswe had a detective agency in Africa, at the foot of Kgale Hill. These were its assets: a tiny white van, two desks, two chairs, a telephone, and an old typewriter. Then there was a teapot, in which Mma Ramotswe--the only lady private detective in Botswana--brewed redbush tea. And three mugs--one for herself, one for her secretary, and one for the client. What else does a detective agency really need? Detective agencies rely on human intuition and intelligence, both of which Mma Ramotswe had in abundance. No inventory would ever include those, of course.But there was also the view, which again could appear on no inventory. How could any such list describe what one saw when one looked out from Mma Ramotswe's door? To the front, an acacia tree, the thorn tree which dots the wide edges of the Kalahari; the great white thorns, a warning; the olive-grey leaves, by contrast, so delicate. In its branches, in the late afternoon, or in the cool of the early morning, one might see a Go-Away Bird, or hear it, rather. And beyond the acacia, over the dusty road, the roofs of the town under a cover of trees and scrub bush; on the horizon, in a blue shimmer of heat, the hills, like improbable, overgrown termite mounds.Everybody called her Mma Ramotswe, although if people had wanted to be formal, they would have addressed her as Mme Mma Ramotswe. This is the right thing for a person of stature, but which she had never used of herself. So it was always Mma Ramotswe, rather than Precious Ramotswe, a name which very few people employed.She was a good detective, and a good woman. A good woman in a good country, one might say. She loved her country, Botswana, which is a place of peace, and she loved Africa, for all its trials. I am not ashamed to be called an African patriot, said Mma Ramotswe. I love all the people whom God made, but I especially know how to love the people who live in this place. They are my people, my brothers and sisters. It is my duty to help them to solve the mysteries in their lives. That is what I am called to do.In idle moments, when there were no pressing matters to be dealt with, and when everybody seemed to be sleepy from the heat, she would sit under her acacia tree. It was a dusty place to sit, and the chickens would occasionally come and peck about her feet, but it was a place which seemed to encourage thought. It was here that Mma Ramotswe would contemplate some of the issues which, in everyday life, may so easily be pushed to one side.Everything, thought Mma Ramotswe, has been something before. Here I am, the only lady private detective in the whole of Botswana, sitting in front of my detective agency. But only a few years ago there was no detective agency, and before that, before there were even any buildings here, there were just the acacia trees, and the riverbed in the distance, and the Kalahari over there, so close.In those days there was no Botswana even, just the Bechuanaland Protectorate, and before that again there was Khama's Country, and lions with the dry wind in their manes. But look at it now: a detective agency, right here in Gaborone, with me, the fat lady detective, sitting outside and thinking these thoughts about how what is one thing today becomes quite another thing tomorrow.Mma Ramotswe set up the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency with the proceeds of the sale of her father's cattle. He had owned a big herd, and had no other children; so every single beast, all one hundred and eighty of them, including the white Brahmin bulls whose grandparents he had bred himself, went to her. The cattle were moved from the cattle post, back to Mochudi where they waited, in the dust, under the eyes of the chattering herd boys, until the livestock agent came.They fetched a good price, as there had been heavy rains that year, and the grass had been lush. Had it been the year before, when most of that southern part of Africa had been wracked by drought, it would have been a different matter. People had dithered then, wanting to hold on to their cattle, as without your cattle you were naked; others, feeling more desperate, sold, because the rains had failed year after year and they had seen the animals become thinner and thinner. Mma Ramotswe was pleased that her father's illness had prevented his making any decision, as now the price had gone up and those who had held on were well rewarded."I want you to have your own business," he said to her on his death bed. "You'll get a good price for the cattle now. Sell them and buy a business. A butchery maybe. A bottle store. Whatever you like."She held her father's hand and looked into the eyes of the man she loved beyond all others, her Daddy, her wise Daddy, whose lungs had been filled with dust in those mines and who had scrimped and saved to make life good for her.It was difficult to talk through her tears, but she managed to say: "I'm going to set up a detective agency. Down in Gaborone. It will be the best one in Botswana. The No. 1 Agency."For a moment her father's eyes opened wide and it seemed as if he was struggling to speak."But . . . but . . ."But he died before he could say anything more, and Mma Ramotswe fell on his chest and wept for all the dignity, love and suffering that died with him.She had a sign painted in bright colours, which was then set up just off the Lobatse Road, on the edge of town, pointing to the small building she had purchased: the no. 1 ladies' detective agency. for all confidential matters and enquiries. satisfaction guaranteed for all parties. under personal management.There was considerable public interest in the setting up of her agency. There was an interview on Radio Botswana, in which she thought she was rather rudely pressed to reveal her qualifications, and a rather more satisfactory article in The Botswana News, which drew attention to the fact that she was the only lady private detective in the country. This article was cut out, copied, and placed prominently on a small board beside the front door of the agency.After a slow start, she was rather surprised to find that her services were in considerable demand. She was consulted about missing husbands, about the creditworthiness of potential business partners, and about suspected fraud by employees. In almost every case, she was able to come up with at least some information for the client; when she could not, she waived her fee, which meant that virtually nobody who consulted her was dissatisfied. People in Botswana liked to talk, she discovered, and the mere mention of the fact that she was a private detective would let loose a positive outpouring of information on all sorts of subjects. It flattered people, she concluded, to be approached by a private detective, and this effectively loosened their tongues. This happened with Happy Bapetsi, one of her earlier clients. Poor Happy! To have lost your daddy and then found him, and then lost him again . . ."I used to have a happy life," said Happy Bapetsi. "A very happy life. Then this thing happened, and I can't say that any- more."Mma Ramotswe watched her client as she sipped her bush tea. Everything you wanted to know about a person was written in the face, she believed. It's not that she believed that the shape of the head was what counted--even if there were many who still clung to that belief; it was more a question of taking care to scrutinise the lines and the general look. And the eyes, of course; they were very important. The eyes allowed you to see right into a person, to penetrate their very essence, and that was why people with something to hide wore sunglasses indoors. They were the ones you had to watch very carefully.Now this Happy Bapetsi was intelligent; that was immediately apparent. She also had few worries--this was shown by the fact that there were no lines on her face, other than smile lines of course. So it was man trouble, thought Mma Ramotswe. Some man has turned up and spoilt everything, destroying her happiness with his bad behaviour."Let me tell you a little about myself first," said Happy Bapetsi. "I come from Maun, you see, right up on the Okavango. My mother had a small shop and I lived with her in the house at the back. We had lots of chickens and we were very happy."My mother told me that my Daddy had left a long time ago, when I was still a little baby. He had gone off to work in Bulawayo and he had never come back. Somebody had written to us--another Motswana living there--to say that he thought that my Daddy was dead, but he wasn't sure. He said that he had gone to see somebody at Mpilo Hospital one day and as he was walking along a corridor he saw them wheeling somebody out on a stretcher and that the dead person on the stretcher looked remarkably like my Daddy. But he couldn't be certain."So we decided that he was probably dead, but my mother did not mind a great deal because she had never really liked him very much. And of course I couldn't even remember him, so it did not make much difference to me."I went to school in Maun at a place run by some Catholic missionaries. One of them discovered that I could do arithmetic rather well and he spent a lot of time helping me. He said that he had never met a girl who could count so well."I suppose it was very odd. I could see a group of figures and I would just remember it. Then I would find that I had added the figures in my head, even without thinking about it. It just came very easily--I didn't have to work at it at all."I did very well in my exams and at the end of the day I went off to Gaborone and learned how to be a bookkeeper. Again it was very simple for me; I could look at a whole sheet of figures and understand it immediately. Then, the next day, I could remember every figure exactly and write them all down if I needed to."I got a job in the bank and I was given promotion after promotion. Now I am the No. 1 subaccountant and I don't think I can go any further because all the men are worried that I'll make them look stupid. But I don't mind. I get very good pay and I can finish all my work by three in the afternoon, sometimes earlier. I go shopping after that. I have a nice house with four rooms and I am very happy. To have all that by the time you are thirty-eight is good enough, I think."Mma Ramotswe smiled. "That is all very interesting. You're right. You've done well.""I'm very lucky," said Happy Bapetsi. "But then this thing happened. My Daddy arrived at the house."Mma Ramotswe drew in her breath. She had not expected this; she had thought it would be a boyfriend problem. Fathers were a different matter altogether."He just knocked on the door," said Happy Bapetsi. "It was a Saturday afternoon and I was taking a rest on my bed when I heard his knocking. I got up, went to the door, and there was this man, about sixty or so, standing there with his hat in his hands. He told me that he was my Daddy, and that he had been living in Bulawayo for a long time but was now back in Botswana and had come to see me."You can understand how shocked I was. I had to sit down, or I think I would have fainted. In the meantime, he spoke. He told me my mother's name, which was correct, and he said that he was sorry that he hadn't been in touch before. Then he asked if he could stay in one of the spare rooms, as he had nowhere else to go."I said that of course he could. In a way I was very excited to see my Daddy and I thought that it would be good to be able to make up for all those lost years and to have him staying with me, particularly since my poor mother died. So I made a bed for him in one of the rooms and cooked him a large meal of steak and potatoes, which he ate very quickly. Then he asked for more."That was about three months ago. Since then, he has been living in that room and I have been doing all the work for him. I make his breakfast, cook him some lunch, which I leave in the kitchen, and then make his supper at night. I buy him one bottle of beer a day and have also bought him some new clothes and a pair of good shoes. All he does is sit in his chair outside the front door and tell me what to do for him next.""Many men are like that," interrupted Mma Ramotswe.Happy Bapetsi nodded. "This one is especially like that. He has not washed a single cooking pot since he arrived and I have been getting very tired running after him. He also spends a lot of my money on vitamin pills and biltong."I would not resent this, you know, except for one thing. I do not think that he is my real Daddy. I have no way of proving this, but I think that this man is an impostor and that he heard about our family from my real Daddy before he died and is now just pretending. I think he is a man who has been looking for a retirement home and who is very pleased because he has found a good one."Mma Ramotswe found herself staring in frank wonderment at Happy Bapetsi. There was no doubt but that she was telling the truth; what astonished her was the effrontery, the sheer, naked effrontery of men. How dare this person come and impose on this helpful, happy person! What a piece of chicanery, of fraud! What a piece of outright theft in fact!"Can you help me?" asked Happy Bapetsi. "Can you find out whether this man is really my Daddy? If he is, then I will be a dutiful daughter and put up with him. If he is not, then I should prefer for him to go somewhere else."Mma Ramotswe did not hesitate. "I'll find out," she said. "It may take me a day or two, but I'll find out!"Of course, it was easier said than done. There were blood tests these days, but she doubted very much whether this person would agree to that. No, she would have to try something more subtle, something that would show beyond any argument whether he was the Daddy or not. She stopped in her line of thought. Yes! There was something biblical about this story. What, she thought, would Solomon have done?

Bookclub Guide

US1. Unlike in most other mysteries, in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency Mma Ramotswe solves a number of small crimes, rather than a single major one. How does this affect the narrative pacing of the novel? What other unique features distinguish The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency from the conventional mystery novel?2. What makes Precious Ramotswe such a charming protagonist? What kind of woman is she? How is she different from the usual detective? Why does she feel “called” to help her fellow Africans “solve the mysteries of their lives” [p. 4]?3. What is surprising about the nature of the cases Mma Ramotswe is hired to solve? By what means does Alexander McCall Smith sustain the reader’s interest, in the absence of the kind of tension, violence, and suspense that drive most mysteries?4. Mma Ramotswe’s first client, Happy Bapetsi, is worried that the man who claims to be her father is a fraud taking advantage of her generosity. “All he does,” she says, “is sit in his chair outside the front door and tell me what to do for him next.” To which Mma Ramotswe replies, “Many men are like that” [p. 10]. What is Mma Ramotswe’s view of men generally? How do men behave in the novel?5. Why does Mma Ramotswe feel it is so important to include her father’s life story in the novel? What does Obed Ramotswe’s life reveal about the history of Africa and of South Africa? What does it reveal about the nature and cost of working in the mines in South Africa?6. Mma Ramotswe purchases a manual on how to be a detective. It advises one to pay attention to hunches. “Hunches are another form of knowledge” [p. 79]. How does intuition help Mma Ramotswe solve her cases?7. When Mma Ramotswe decides to start a detective agency, a lawyer tells her “It’s easy to lose money in business, especially when you don’t know anything about what you’re doing. . . . And anyway, can women be detectives?” To which Mma Ramotswe answers, “Women are the ones who know what’s going on. They are the ones with eyes. Have you not read Agatha Christie?” [p. 61]. Is she right in suggesting women are more perceptive than men? Where in the novel do we see Mma Ramotswe’s own extraordinary powers of observation? How does she comically undercut the lawyer’s arrogance in this scene?8. As Mma Ramotswe wonders if Mma Malatsi was somehow involved in her husband’s death and whether wanting someone dead made one a murderer in God’s eyes, she thinks to herself: “It was time to take the pumpkin out of the pot and eat it. In the final analysis, that was what solved these big problems of life. You could think and think and get nowhere, but you still had to eat your pumpkin. That brought you down to earth. That gave you a reason for going on. Pumpkin” [p. 85]. What philosophy of life is Mma Ramotswe articulating here? Why do the ongoing daily events of life give her this sense of peace and stability?9. Why does Mma Ramotswe marry Note? Why does this act seem so out of character for her? In what ways does her love for an attractive and physically abusive man make her a deeper and more complicated character? How does her marriage to Note change her?10. Mma Ramotswe imagines retiring back in Mochudi, buying some land with her cousins, growing melons, and living life in such a way that “every morning she could sit in front of her house and sniff at the wood-smoke and look forward to spending the day talking with her friends. How sorry she felt for white people, who couldn’t do any of this, and who were always dashing around and worrying themselves over things that were going to happen anyway. What use was it having all that money if you could never sit still or just watch your cattle eating grass? None, in her view; none at all” [p. 162]. Is Mma Ramotswe’s critique of white people on the mark or is she stereotyping? What makes her sense of what is important, and what brings happiness, so refreshing? What other differences between black and white cultures does the novel make apparent?11. Mma Ramotswe does not want Africa to change, to become thoroughly modern: “She did not want her people to become like everybody else, soulless, selfish, forgetful of what it means to be an African, or, worse still, ashamed of Africa” [p. 215]. But what aspects of traditional African culture trouble her? How does she regard the traditional African attitude toward women, marriage, family duty, and witchcraft? Is there a contradiction in her relationship to “old” Africa?12. How surprising is Mme Ramotswe’s response to Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni’s marriage proposal? How appropriate is the ending of the novel?13. Alexander McCall Smith has both taught and written about criminal law. In what ways does in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency draw upon this knowledge? How are lawyers and the police characterized in the novel?14. Is in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency a feminist novel? Does the fact that its author is a man complicate such a reading? How well does Alexander McCall Smith represent a woman’s character and consciousness in Mma Ramotswe?15. Alexander McCall Smith’s Precious Ramotswe books have been praised for their combination of apparent simplicity with a high degree of sophistication. In what ways does in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency have the appeal of simple storytelling? In what ways is it sophisticated? What does it suggest about the larger issues of how to live one’s life, how to behave in society, how to be happy?

Editorial Reviews

NATIONAL BESTSELLERINTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER“The Miss Marple of Botswana.” The New York Times Book Review “Smart and sassy...Precious’ progress is charted in passages that have the power to amuse or shock or touch the heart, sometimes all at once.” Los Angeles Times “The author’s prose has the merits of simplicity, euphony and precision. His descriptions leave one as if standing in the Botswana landscape. This is art that conceals art. I haven’t read anything with such alloyed pleasure for a long time.” Anthony Daniels, The Sunday Telegraph