Persuasion

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Persuasion

by Jane Austen
Editor Gillian Beer
Introduction by Gillian Beer

Penguin Publishing Group | April 29, 2003 | Trade Paperback

Persuasion is rated 3.6667 out of 5 by 3.

Penguin Classics relaunch.

     At twenty-­seven, Anne Elliot is no longer young and has few romantic prospects. Eight years earlier, she had been persuaded by her friend Lady Russell to break off her engagement to Frederick Wentworth, a handsome naval captain with neither fortune nor rank. What happens when they encounter each other again is movingly told in Jane Austen's last completed novel. Set in the fashionable societies of Lyme Regis and Bath, Persuasion is a brilliant satire of vanity and pretension, but, above all, it is a love story tinged with the heartache of missed opportunities.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 7.75 × 5.05 × 0.68 in

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141439688

ISBN - 13: 9780141439686

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 15%

  • In stock online

$7.99  ea

Online Price

$9.00 List Price

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from As the last one written, you should also read it last. Last of the novels to be completed during her lifetime, Jane Austen’s Persuasion tells the story of Anne Elliot who almost ten years after breaking her engagement to then penniless Captain Wentworth, sees their acquaintance revive as his sister and her husband take hold of the ancestral Elliot manor now in need of tenants. Though Anne, who at first believed she had forgotten him, is still in love with him, it does not seem that his feelings remained the same for he is cold and unforgiving. That is up until a certain accident in Lyme and an encounter with a distant cousin of Anne, will change irrevocably the faith of many. I particularly enjoyed this novel as it is quite different from all of Austen’s other novel. Where originally unpardonable mistakes are usually punished through the showcasing of others good morality, here the novels puts forward the concept of mistakes and second chances as Anne Elliot, who suffers silently on the account of her proud father and elder sister who do not think highly of her, and Captain Wentworth, now rich and respectable in the eyes of many, rekindle their feelings for one another and persuade themselves to give love another try. Throughout the novel, you can't help but suffer with Anne and hope for the best and wish for Captain Wentworth to warm up to her again. This goes without saying that, in some cases, people need to believe that second chances in love may be worth it, if they are convinced of it. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at : ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Persuasion is like an old friend ... Persuasion is one of my favorite Jane Austen novels, second only to Pride & Prejudice. Persuasion follows the life of Anne Elliot and her struggles to find love and happiness. Anne had turned down a proposal of marriage 8 years earlier to a Captain Wentworth; but Anne had never stopped loving Captain Wentworth. This novel shows the flaws of Miss Elliot's family and connections, as well as her own. Wonderful story of lost love found again.
Date published: 2009-05-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from very good apparently, this novel was written in the last few years of jane austen's life, and published only after her death. it tells a story of anne elliot, heroine in the novel, who was persuaded to let the love of her life, frederick wentworth get away. after eight years, anne is still alone but meets him again. it is evident that they both still have feelings for one another. overall, i liked it. especially the ending... a letter that is so beautifully written and so touching. it is romantic and you can't help but allow yourself to be taken on the enjoyable journey.
Date published: 2006-07-17

– More About This Product –

Persuasion

Persuasion

by Jane Austen
Editor Gillian Beer
Introduction by Gillian Beer

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 7.75 × 5.05 × 0.68 in

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141439688

ISBN - 13: 9780141439686

Read from the Book

Chapter I Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch Hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who,for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Baronetage;there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in adistressed one; there his faculties were roused into admiration andrespect, by contemplating the limited remnant of the earliest patents;there any unwelcome sensations, arising from domestic affairschanged naturally into pity and contempt. As he turned overthe almost endless creations of the last century—and there,if every other leaf were powerless, he could read his own historywith an interest which never failed—this was the page at whichthe favourite volume always opened: ELLIOT OF KELLYNCH HALL.Walter Elliot, born March 1, 1760, married, July 15, 1784, Elizabeth,daughter of James Stevenson, Esq. of South Park, in the county ofGloucester, by which lady (who died 1800) he has issue Elizabeth,born June 1, 1785; Anne, born August 9, 1787; a still-born son,November 5, 1789; Mary, born November 20, 1791.Precisely such had the paragraph originally stood from the printer's hands;but Sir Walter had improved it by adding, for the information ofhimself and his family, these words, after the date of Mary's birth—"Married, Dec 16, 1810, Charles, son and heir of CharlesMusgrove, Esq. of Uppercross, in the county of Somerset,"—and by inserting most accurately the day of the month on whichhe had lost his wife.Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable
read more read less

From the Publisher

Penguin Classics relaunch.

     At twenty-­seven, Anne Elliot is no longer young and has few romantic prospects. Eight years earlier, she had been persuaded by her friend Lady Russell to break off her engagement to Frederick Wentworth, a handsome naval captain with neither fortune nor rank. What happens when they encounter each other again is movingly told in Jane Austen's last completed novel. Set in the fashionable societies of Lyme Regis and Bath, Persuasion is a brilliant satire of vanity and pretension, but, above all, it is a love story tinged with the heartache of missed opportunities.

From the Jacket

Twenty-seven-year old Anne Elliot is Austen’s most adult heroine. Eight years before the story proper begins, she is happily betrothed to a naval officer, Frederick Wentworth, but she precipitously breaks off the engagement when persuaded by her friend Lady Russell that such a match is unworthy. The breakup produces in Anne a deep and long-lasting regret. When later Wentworth returns from sea a rich and successful captain, he finds Anne’s family on the brink of financial ruin and his own sister a tenant in Kellynch Hall, the Elliot estate. Al the tension of the novel revolves around one question: Will Anne and Wentworth be reunited in their love?

Jane Austen once compared her writing to painting on a little bit of ivory, 2 inches square. Readers of Persuasion will discover that neither her skill for delicate, ironic observations on social custom, love, and marriage nor her ability to apply a sharp focus lens to English manners and morals has deserted her in her final finished work.

About the Author

JANE AUSTEN (1775-1817) was extremely modest about her own genius but has become one of English literature's most famous women writers. She is the author of Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park and Northanger Abbey

GILLIAN BEER is King Edward Professor of English at the University of Cambridge and President of Clare Hall.

Editorial Reviews

“Critics, especially [recently], value Persuasion highly, as the author’s ‘most deeply felt fiction,’ ‘the novel which in the end the experienced reader of Jane Austen puts at the head of the list.’ . . . Anne wins back Wentworth and wins over the reader; we may, like him, end up thinking Anne’s character ‘perfection itself.’” –from the Introduction by Judith Terry

Bookclub Guide

INTRODUCTION

Twenty-seven-year old Anne Elliot is Austen's most adult heroine. Eight years before the story proper begins, she is happily betrothed to a naval officer, Frederick Wentworth, but she precipitously breaks off the engagement when persuaded by her friend Lady Russell that such a match is unworthy. The breakup produces in Anne a deep and long-lasting regret. When later Wentworth returns from sea a rich and successful captain, he finds Anne's family on the brink of financial ruin and his own sister a tenant in Kellynch Hall, the Elliot estate. All the tension of the novel revolves around one question: Will Anne and Wentworth be reunited in their love?

On the most basic level Persuasion is a love story, both interesting and entertaining, rich in intrigue and romance. On a deeper level it examines human foibles and societal flaws. The question of the importance of propriety is raised frequently, as is the issue of appearance versus reality.

Readers of Persuasion will discover Austen's talents on full display: her skill for delicate, ironic observations on social custom, love, and marriage nor her ability to apply a sharp focus lens to English manners and morals.


ABOUT JANE AUSTEN

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, at Steventon near Basingstoke, the seventh child of the rector of the parish. She lived with her family at Steventon until they moved to Bath when her father retired in 1801. After his death in 1805, she moved around with her mother; in 1809, they settled in Chawton, near Alton, Hampshire. Here she remained, except for a few visits to London, until in May 1817 she moved to Winchester to be near her doctor. There she died on July 18, 1817.

As a girl Jane Austen wrote stories, including burlesques of popular romances. Her works were only published after much revision, four novels being published in her lifetime. These are Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816). Two other novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, were published posthumously in 1818 with a biographical notice by her brother, Henry Austen, the first formal announcement of her authorship. Persuasion was written in a race against failing health in 1815-16. She also left two earlier compositions, a short epistolary novel, Lady Susan, and an unfinished novel, The Watsons. At the time of her death, she was working on a new novel, Sanditon, a fragmentary draft of which survives.


DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
  • Sir Walter is disturbed because he doesn't like the way his "heir presumptive" has acted in the past. Why do you think he can't just leave his money, title, and estate to his daughters?

  • To what extent do you agree with Sir Walter on the value of rank and consequence?

  • What do you think led Anne to acquiesce to her family's wishes? Should families have a say in whom their children marry?

  • What does the book illustrate about how naval men view women? What assumptions are they making about women?

  • Captain Wentworth and Anne are constantly in each other's company. What keeps them from speaking honestly to each other? Would you invite two people who had once been engaged to the same social gathering? Both the Captain and Anne are very polite to each other. How might things be different today?

  • The Crofts are portrayed as one of the few happily married couples in the novel. What is it about their relationship that seems so different from the other relationships portrayed in the book?

  • What seems to make Mary happy? Why might women at the time of the novel have focused on such things?

  • What does Anne's relationship with Mrs. Smith suggest to you about Anne? How does her father react to these visits? Why?

  • Austen writes of Captain Benwick: "His reading has done him no harm, for he has fought as well as read." What does this statement indicate about what was important at this time? To what extent have attitudes changed in our time?

  • Captain Harville claims men do not quickly forget about the women they love while Anne claims the same for women. Do you believe men and women differ in their capacities to love and in remaining true to the one they love?

  • Anne believes she was right to be "persuaded" by Lady Russell not to marry Captain Wentworth when he proposed years earlier. Explain her reasoning. Do you agree with her?

  • Austen wrote Persuasion as her health was failing, hurrying to finish it before her death. Do you find the novel's narrative carries any sense of urgency or sentimentality, or any other indication of what the author herself was going through as she wrote it?

  • What was Jane Austen most critical of in her society? What are you most critical of in the modern world?