Trickster: An Anthropological Memoir by Eileen Kane

Trickster: An Anthropological Memoir

byEileen Kane

Paperback | August 1, 2010

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A young trainee anthropologist leaves her violent Mafia-run hometown-Youngstown, Ohio-to study an "exotic" group, the Paiute Indians of Nevada. This is 1964; she'll be "the expert," and they'll be "the subjects." The Paiute elders have other ideas. They'll be "the parents." They set themselves two tasks: to help her get a good grade on her project and to send her home quickly to her new bridegroom. They dismiss her research topic and introduce her instead to their spirit creature, the outrageously mischievous rule-breaking trickster, Coyote.

Why do the Paiutes love Coyote? Why do Youngstown mill workers vote for Mafia candidates for municipal office? Tricksters become key to understanding how oppressed groups function in a hostile world. For more information visit www.trickster.ie.

About The Author

Eileen Kane is an applied anthropologist who chaired the first department of anthropology in Ireland and now works on participatory development and education programs in Africa. She is the author of Doing Your Own Research (Boyars, 2001) and numerous World Bank and aid agency studies.
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Trickster: An Anthropological Memoir
Trickster: An Anthropological Memoir

by Eileen Kane

$19.19$23.95

Available for download

Not available in stores

Details & Specs

Title:Trickster: An Anthropological MemoirFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9.04 × 6.02 × 0.57 inPublished:August 1, 2010Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Higher Education DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1442601787

ISBN - 13:9781442601789

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Foreword

Acknowledgments

Introduction, Alice Beck Kehoe

1. Vows

2. At Home on the Range

3. The Kah'nii

4. Missing Bomb City

5. Anthropology: A Mirror for Man

6. Two Italian Towns

7. Not Worrying

8. The Tribal Council

9. Why Anthropology?

10. Crossing Boundaries

11. The Murder

12. Drawing Lessons

13. Kinship Patterns

14. Game-Playing

15. Two-Thirds of the Way

16. Who We Are

17. The Rabbit Net

18. Ethnobabble

19. Ruin...

20. ...and Reprieve

20. The Killer

21. The Mission

22. The Parting

Epilogue

Discussion Points and Exercises

References and Further Readings

Editorial Reviews

A young trainee anthropologist leaves her violent Mafia-run hometown-Youngstown, Ohio-to study an "exotic" group, the Paiute Indians of Nevada. This is 1964; she'll be "the expert," and they'll be "the subjects." The Paiute elders have other ideas. They'll be "the parents." They set themselves two tasks: to help her get a good grade on her project and to send her home quickly to her new bridegroom. They dismiss her research topic and introduce her instead to their spirit creature, the outrageously mischievous rule-breaking trickster, Coyote.Why do the Paiutes love Coyote? Why do Youngstown mill workers vote for Mafia candidates for municipal office? Tricksters become key to understanding how oppressed groups function in a hostile world. For more information visit www.trickster.ie. Eileen Kane is a fantastic writer-in fact, one of the best I've ever seen in anthropology, past or present. She keeps the story moving briskly, she has a novelist's eye for detail, and she renders perfect dialogue, which as Anne Lamont says, is the way to convey character. She's one of those rare anthropologists who can tell a great story while imparting cultural understanding. I hope she continues to tell stories. Anthropology needs a voice like hers. - Peter Wogan, Willamette University