Who Has Seen the Wind by W.o. MitchellWho Has Seen the Wind by W.o. Mitchell

Who Has Seen the Wind

byW.o. Mitchell

Paperback | September 16, 2000

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When W.O. Mitchell died in 1998 he was described as “Canada's best-loved writer.” Every commentator agreed that his best – and his best-loved – book was Who Has Seen the Wind. Since it was first published in 1947, this book has sold almost a million copies in Canada.

As we enter the world of four-year-old Brian O’Connal, his father the druggist, his Uncle Sean, his mother, and his formidable Scotch grandmother (“she belshes…a lot”), it soon becomes clear that this is no ordinary book. As we watch Brian grow up, the prairie and its surprising inhabitants like the Ben and Saint Sammy – and the rich variety of small-town characters – become unforgettable. This book will be a delightful surprise for all those who are aware of it, but have never quite got around to reading it, till now.
W.O. Mitchell, the only Canadian author recognizable by initials alone, was born in Weyburn, Saskatchewan in 1914. Educated at the University of Manitoba, he lived most of his life in Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Alberta, where for many years he was the most renowned resident in High River. He and his wife, Merna, subsequently moved to C...
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Title:Who Has Seen the WindFormat:PaperbackDimensions:392 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.99 inPublished:September 16, 2000Publisher:McClelland & StewartLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0771061110

ISBN - 13:9780771061110

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not My Type of Novel I read this novel a number of years ago because I was forced to. It was for English class. It was a real struggle to get through it. the novel is incredibly slow and the plot, whatever little there is supposed to be, moves along so slowly. the characters were uninteresting and basically the whole story was uninteresting. Furthermore, the entire atmosphere that the novel is set in is depressing. there is a sense of loneliness and isolation that encompasses the entire book. this is not an uplifting book.
Date published: 2017-04-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I wouldn't have read it unless I was forced to True, I was assigned this book for a novel study at school, and after doing many projects and essays on it, I can say that I have a very good grasp of the story. The thing about this book is is that you either absoutley love it or you absoutley hate it. For myself, I enjoyed the internal sense of community while Brian grows up. But the thing that struck me most was the spirtuality of the wind, it isn't just any normal element, but a symbol of god. Overall it would be a benefit for anybody to read, some may sterotype this book as the typical Canadian story, on the prairie, during the Great Depression. But I gurantee you that there is much more to it than that, as the poem in the beginning says. It is about a boy and the wind. Enjoy everbody!
Date published: 2002-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A book I won't soon be forgetting... If it be a no-brainer adventure or a plot full of relentless debauchery you're looking for, I suggest you avoid this book entirely. However, if you seek a deeply touching novel of intelligence and substance, indeed I urge you to read Who Has Seen The Wind. It portrays the story of a prairie boy's initiation into the mysteries of life, as he discovers death, God, and the spirit that moves through everything: the wind. The plot details the little things in life that most of the masses overlook, and accurately relates the expressions and deep feelings of a young person growing up during the Great Depression. In lieu of a book given to the class to read in Grade 10 (for a plethora of reasons), I was given this novel to read instead. I could relate very easily to the primary character, Brian, in the novel. I was lost in his maturation and progression as a character. WHSTW has definitely contributed to the way I progressed as a young person. It is truly a book I will never forget.
Date published: 2002-01-01
Rated 1 out of 5 by from worst book ever This book was the worst piece of litterature that I ever had the misfortune of reading. The plot was slow and without a true focal point. There is no evolution in the plot structur and it certainly has no climax! I would suggest to others to purchase this novel if they are lacking sleep. The only reason I read it is that I was forced.(school) I advise others to stay clear of this novel.
Date published: 2001-04-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from who has seen the wind This is not the kind of book read for the plot. It's an excellent novel about the process of growing up. Although it could be criticized as a rather romantic view of the depression years, especially in comparison to the Grapes of Wrath, I'd still say that it has a lot to teach us about human nature.
Date published: 2001-03-23
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Extreme Boredom Who Has Seen The Wind is one of the most well known Canadian Classics. However, despite all of it's fame, it lacks the essential key elements to grasp the attention of the reader and to stimulate one's thought. It's long dragging points and endless dwellings on certain topics drag the reader into a state, known as a coma. I found myself slipping away into a coma while I attempted to read this book, lucky for me I was jerked back to conciousness by the erge to live.In Conclusion, the book has not lived to it's hype, instead it can be interpretted as a spiral downfall into nothingness. P.S: Please take this book off the school cirriculum to avoid submitting other vivtims to this book. -Student
Date published: 2001-02-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from WONDERFUL I do have to disagree with the other reviewer, i found this book to be one of the best books i have ever read. A slow start yes, but a meaningful ending. The story deals with its main theme of grief. I recomend this to ANYONE and EVERYONE. Who Has Seen the Wind, a Canadian classic, a part of our history.
Date published: 2001-01-25
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Who has seen the plot? If there is any other better way to cure insomnia, I would like to know about it! I read it because it has been considered to be one of Canada's classic novels. If this is what we consider classic, I can see why our economy is not as great as it used to be. A slow start and a long dragging end. Each event is predictable, while the imagery and spirituality of the novel seems to be forced. If you have a few hours to kill, and I mean kill by all means read this novel.
Date published: 2000-11-26

From Our Editors

One of the all-time classics of Canadian literature, Who Has Seen the Wind has enchanted readers for decades with its powerful story of a boy’s childhood in the prairies. Young Brian, with a youthful spirit both innocent and questioning, observes the social rituals of a small town and their contrast with the primal force of nature. Both humourous and tragic, and infused throughout with an evocative sense of prairie life, W.O. Mitchell’s tale remains an unforgettable Canadian story.

Editorial Reviews

“One of the finest Canadian novels ever written.”
Globe and Mail

“Mitchell…has so thoroughly captured the feeling of Canada and the Canadian people that we feel repeated shock of recognition as we read.”
–Robertson Davies