A Cabinet of Philosophical Curiosities: A Collection of Puzzles, Oddities, Riddles, and Dilemmas

Hardcover | April 20, 2016

byRoy Sorensen

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Will you answer this question in the same way that you will answer my next question? Done? Good!Will you buy this book? Inside you will discover that your only truthful answer to this second question is affirmative. Logic has made some men rich. Inside this book you will learn of John Eck (who debated Luther in 1519). He Will you answer this question in the same way that you will answer my next question? Done? Good! Will you buy this book? Inside you will discover that your only truthful answer to this secondquestion is affirmative. A Cabinet of Philosophical Curiosities is a colorful collection of puzzles and paradoxes, both historical and contemporary, by philosopher Roy Sorensen. Taking inspiration from Ian Stewart's Professor Stewart's Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities, which assembled interesting "maths" from outside theclassroom into a miscellany of marvels, these puzzles are ready to be enjoyed independently but gain mutual support when read in clusters. The volume ranges from simple examples to anomalous anomalies, considers data that seems to confirm a generalization while lowering its probability, and arguesthat we are doomed to believe infinitely many contradictions - and that the pain of contradictions can be profoundly stimulating.Inside this book you will learn of John Eck, who debated Luther in 1519. He devised a sequence of contracts that sidestepped usury laws, and German bankers made a fortune from this Triple Contract. Sorensen also recounts how Voltaire set himself up for life by exploiting a fallacy in theconstruction of a Parisian lottery. There is logic for altruists, too. You will discover how General Benjamin Butler used other-centric reasoning to protect runaway slaves. There are historical snapshots of logic in action, and the book contains tributes to Lewis Carroll, Arthur Prior, and PeterGeach. In addition to short essays, there are dialogues, cures and insults.

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Will you answer this question in the same way that you will answer my next question? Done? Good!Will you buy this book? Inside you will discover that your only truthful answer to this second question is affirmative. Logic has made some men rich. Inside this book you will learn of John Eck (who debated Luther in 1519). He Will you answ...

Roy Sorensen is a professor of philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author of Seeing Dark Things, A Brief History of the Paradox, Vagueness and Contradiction, Pseudo-Problems, Thought Experiments and Blindspots.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.98 inPublished:April 20, 2016Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019982956X

ISBN - 13:9780199829569

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Table of Contents

Absent MindedAdvice from Shih TengAirport RiddlesAgainst Trying your BestAntinomyAntisuperlativeAnything is possible?Arbitrary ChoiceBallot MetaphysicsBeing AloneBias against the AbsentBible CodesBook Review of A Million Random DigitsBrother in Law ResemblanceCan Jesus Argue Fallaciously?Can you believe the impossible?The Cheated GodChristimas 364Circumnavigator's ParadoxThe Completeness Concern and Dirty HarryCompulsive CounterexamplingConformexamplesConsequentia mirabilisCoping with ChaosCounter-illusionsThe Cow Pox Transport ProblemA Cure for Incontinence!Do Butterflies Dream?Dreams of the LogiciansEternal ReturnEvil ConceptsThe Egg Came before the ChickenExploiting IsomorphismFairness FallaciesFaking Munchausen'sFallible or Anti-Infallible?Fame as the Forgotten PhilosopherFictional TheismFirst Semantic ParadoxFugu for TwoGell-Mann's Slip of the TongueHandicaps on DeductionHappy Death Day!Happy Unbirthday!How Smoking Saved Bertrand Russell's LifeI am an Inconsistent MachineIdle ReasoningI do not understandIllogical Coin CollectionInclusive Insight for ChildrenInconsistent VisionInfallible or Anti-Infallible?It's a jumble out there!Infinite Two Minute DebateKettle LogicLiar's LoopholeLogically Equivalent - but EasierLogic pensLogical TheftLosing by winningMayor of Casterbridge's PlanMeta-agnosticMeta-argumentMetaphysics of the Law of AveragesThe Mexican IntuitionistModus Ponens or Modus Tollens?Multiple Choice as a SportNanofallaciesNecessary WasteNothing is written in stoneThe Odd Universe of Nelson GoodmanOrwell Problems for ArgumentsOther-centric ReasoningPalindromic ArgumentsPebble from the Baths of CaracullaPermission to CheatA Plenum of PalindromesPortable ProofsPremature Explanatory SatiationProfessor IgnoranceQuine's African TourQuine's Ground OutRandom QuizRationally Believing ContradictionsRazed HopesReasonable Doubt - Juror PointRussell's Slip of the PenSeance with an ImmortalSelf-Fulfilling Self-Defeating PropheciesSmartfoundingSnappy Comebacks by LogiciansStatistics for PessimistsSteve Martin's ContradictionsTo Be and Not to BeTolstoy's SyllogismToward a Fairer Share of DishwashingTwo GoldfishThe Unbearable Lightness of Logical ConclusionsUnbirthdaysWe disagreeWinning by DrawingWinning by Losing 542Why do Ethicists Marry Logicians?Why Fanatics are so Logical