A Confederacy of Dunces

Kobo ebook | December 1, 2007

byJohn Kennedy Toole, Walker Percy

not yet rated|write a review
A Confederacy of Dunces is an American comic masterpiece. John Kennedy Toole’s hero is one Ignatius J. Reilly, huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, and a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter. His story bursts with wholly original character, denizens of New Orleans’ lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures” (Henry Kisor, Chicago Sun Times)

Pricing and Purchase Info

$13.89 online
$17.99 list price (save 22%)
Available for download
Not available in stores

From the Publisher

A Confederacy of Dunces is an American comic masterpiece. John Kennedy Toole’s hero is one Ignatius J. Reilly, huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, and a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter. His story bursts with wholly original character, denizens of New Orleans’ lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures” (Henry K...

Format:Kobo ebookPublished:December 1, 2007Publisher:Grove/atlantic, Inc.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802197620

ISBN - 13:9780802197627

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent This is so good, it's now in my top 100 favourite books of all time!
Date published: 2014-05-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Confederacy of Dunces Im not going to write a book report but this, as the pulitzer price it won would imply is a great book.
Date published: 2014-02-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Dark humour... very dark humour... It sounds like this book is way too obscur and dark for some readers, who should maybe stick to Oprah's book club. Admittedly it can take some time to get into, but not all books have a Davincicodesque plot and storyline. Some books are actual literature and Confederacy of Dunces falls into that category. It is definitely character driven, and although it is comedic it is also tragic. The reader is not meant to identify with Ignatius J. Reilly. He is meant to repulse us. However, he also embodies the pretention we ALL have in our own lives (yes, including myself ! - as well as other critics...) Each of us is proud and a little pretentious with regards to different aspects in our lives, and this is a point the author brings our beautifully. Everyone is entitled to their opinion of course, but I think people should remember that just because you don't like a character, it doesn't mean the book is bad (I can understand though how it makes us feel like it is...)
Date published: 2006-07-21
Rated 1 out of 5 by from How could it have won a Pulitzer???? Having read this book for a bookclub, I can only gasp with rage that I have lost valuable time in my life reading this...hoping it will get better. The main character was disgusting, a boor, and not interesting in the least. I have met one person in life like him and quickly ran the other way. This book needs to be retired to the trashbin - or put on display as a book never to be repeated!
Date published: 2006-02-03
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Highly over-rated I'm sorry, but this book did not do it for me at all. While I understood all of the humour, I didn't find it the least bit amusing. The protagonist is annoying, pathetic and ridiculous, the story dull, and the jokes repetitive (How often can someone refer to their valve and still have it be funny?) The characters and plot may be original, but they are neither engaging nor believable.
Date published: 2005-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Confederacy Of Laughter This book will take you on a wild and unpredictable ride. Every time I recommend it to a friend they read the back cover, look at the oddball picture on the front and give me a puzzled look. But I insist they give it a try. Soon they are telling me they can’t put it down and before I know it they’ve leant it out to somebody else and bought themselves a copy. Ignatius J. Riley will get under your skin. He is repulsive and adorable at the same time. He has to be the vilest character that fiction ever produced. When reading the things that Ignatius does and thinks you will find yourself simultaneously laughing and shrieking with horror. Ignatius is brilliant, a student of philosophy and higher learning. Yet, somewhere along the way something in Ignatius has gone terribly wrong. His worldview suggests insanity at times and plain and simple truth at others. Ignatius manages to get mixed up in altercations with the law, wild parties, peasant revolts and upheaval wherever he goes. There is a cloud of oppression following him and even though he is the picture of disgusting morals and slovenliness, you find yourself champion his cause. Even the man whose company Ignatius single handedly put in pearl, Gus Levy, said of Ignatius, “Sometimes you have to see a person in his real environment to understand him.” He felt sorry for the ‘kook’ who tried to destroy him. Ignatius’s poor mother becomes a villain, along with his nemesis and oddly romantic love-interest, Mirna Minx, who sends him desperate dispatches as crazy and thought provoking as his own. This story will transfix you. You will want to see this slovenly beast succeed, against all odds. In the end you will want to know Ignatius and champion his cause, which will make you question your own sanity, as he is no less repulsive as the story draws to a close. You will laugh your way through this roller coaster ride and feel a certain discomforting feeling that this poor man’s life may in fact mirror that of the author, John Kennedy Toole, who committed suicide before seeing the book’s publication and later rise to Pulitzer Prize winning fame.
Date published: 2004-10-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A protagonist like no other You've never met anyone quite like Ignatius J. Reilly, and you should consider yourself lucky. Reilly is the proverbial bull in the china shop of this novel, a lumbering intellectual dynamo who affects everyone he meets in mid-60s New Orleans. This is one of the unique creations of 20th century literature.
Date published: 2004-06-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Genius!!!!!!! In "A Confederacy of Dunces" John Kennedy Toole creates an outrageous character in Ignatius J. Reilly. Everything about Ignatius is the opposite to most behaviors and represents the antithesis of all popular value systems. Through Ignatius, Toole criticizes capitalism in the Levy Pants factory that Ignatius works, the institute of law and the morally bankrupt people who live in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Certainly a Mardi Gras in print, the reader is treated to the hilarious perspective and outrageous comments of a modern day knave in Ignatius J. Reilly.
Date published: 2001-04-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Confederacy of Dunces An epic comedy of enormous scale that will have even the most jaded reader laughing out loud. Filled to capacity with both high and low humor, this book is also richly ingrained with literary allusions and antecedents - from Bethius and Chaucer to Falstaff and W.C. Fields. Both wonderfully intelligent and delightfully silly, this Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel will keep you both enraptured and giggling. It also possesses what is sure to be one of the most bizarre publishing stories that you will ever encounter.
Date published: 1999-03-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Confederacy of Dunces This book was published by the author's mother after he committed suicide (numerous pubishers' rejections?). It went on to become a Pulitzer Prize winner and a literary classic. It is absolutely brilliant. You will, at once, despise and adore Ignatius J. Reilly, and the abundant and bizarre cast of characters in New Orleans. Curious and more curious!
Date published: 1998-10-29