A Country Without Strikes; A Visit To The Compulsory Arbitration Court Of New Zealand

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byHenry Demarest Lloyd

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ...has been made that the arbitration act as administered gives an unfair advantage to the trade-unionists, and that this advantage goes to a very small minority, since only a slight proportion of the workingmen in New Zealand, as in Great Britain and the United States, are organised. Even in Great Britain, the home of trade-unionism, only about one sixth of the men are enrolled. To this extent the act does accentuate an inequality-But as any seven men can form a union in the trade, they need not endure this discrimination a day longer than they themselves wish to. The only circumstances which would make it possible that any industrial dispute in New Zealand should escape arbitration, would be the entire absence of any organisation, either among the masters or the men. If such a thing were conceivable as an agreement between the employers and the men not to invoke the courts, but to go on striking and locking out at their own sweet will, and they should agree for that purpose to refrain on both sides from organisation, we should certainly have a case, but the only case in which there could be no arbitration. The state has no independent power of its own to investigate labour troubles, nor to move to settle them of its own motion. The Minister of Labour, Mr. Reeves, in offering his bill, declared himself to be in favour of such initiative, but thought that the community was not yet ripe to entrust the government with such power. The New Zealand law is so far altogether individualistic. Persons can compel arbitration, but the people cannot. The protection of the public interests is for the present then entrusted to the initiative of the aggrieved individual, under the certainty that the class feeling between labour and capital is strong enough...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ...has been made that the arbitration act as administered gives an unfair advantage to the trade-unionists, and th...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:42 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.09 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217425143

ISBN - 13:9780217425148

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