A Discourse Occasioned By The Death Of Daniel Webster; Preached At The Melodeon, October 31, 1852

Paperback | January 31, 2012

byTheodore Parker

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853. Excerpt: ... shrink from such a contest as this. I applaud their sentiments: they are such as religion and humanity dictate, and such as none but cannibals would wish to eradicate from the human heart." Whereupon the editor asks, Will not the federal soldiers call the man who made the speech " a coldblooded wretch, whose heart is callous to every patriotic feeling?" and then, "We do not wonder at Mr. Webster's reluctance again to appear at the city of Washington" (he was attending cases at court): "even his native brass must be abashed at his own conduct, at his own speeches."! Flattery " has spoiled him; for application might have made him something a dozen years hence. It has given him confidence, a face of brass, which and his native volubility are mistaken for 'pre-eminent talent.' Of all men in the State, he is the fittest to be the tool of the enemy." J He was one of the men that bring the " nation to the verge of ruin;" a " Thompsonian intriguer;" a "Macfarland admirer." "The self-importance and gross egotism he displays are disgusting." "You would suppose him a great merchant, living in a maritime city, and not a man reared in the woods of Salisbury, or educated in the wilds of Hanover." § Before he was elected to Congress, Mr. Hill accused him of " deliberate falsehood," of "telling bold untruths to justify the enormities of the enemy." The cry was raised, "The Union is in danger." Mr. Webster was to bring about "a dissolution of the Union." "The few conspirators in Boston, who aim at the division of the Union, and the English Government, who support them in their rebellion, appear to play into each other's hands with remarkable adroitness." The Patriot speaks of "the mad measures of the Boston junto; the hateful, hypocritical scheme of its canting, di...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853. Excerpt: ... shrink from such a contest as this. I applaud their sentiments: they are such as religion and humanity dictate, and such as no...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:38 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.08 inPublished:January 31, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217151493

ISBN - 13:9780217151498

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