A Disease in the Public Mind: A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil War

Paperback | June 3, 2014

byThomas Fleming

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In this riveting, character-driven history, one of our most respected historians traces the diseases in the public mind—the distortions of reality—that destroyed George Washington's vision of a united America and inflicted the tragedy that still divide's the nation's soul.

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In this riveting, character-driven history, one of our most respected historians traces the diseases in the public mind—the distortions of reality—that destroyed George Washington's vision of a united America and inflicted the tragedy that still divide's the nation's soul.

Thomas Fleming is a distinguished historian and author of more than fifty books. A frequent guest on PBS, A&E, and the History Channel, Fleming has contributed articles to American Heritage, MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, and many other magazines. He lives in New York City.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:384 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:June 3, 2014Publisher:Da Capo PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0306822954

ISBN - 13:9780306822957

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Roanoke Times, 4/26/13“A thoughtful examination of the root cause of that costly conflagration that interrupted the lives of the entire nationFleming's trademark as an historian is his ability to tell a story without interjecting his bias or his own opinions, unless they are supported by facts. In this book, Fleming continues that tradition of professional observationFleming's story about our ‘disease in the public mind' is the very essence of good history.”Library Journal, 5/1/13“Controversial.”