A Doll's House by Henrik IbsenA Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen

A Doll's House

byHenrik Ibsen

Paperback | February 21, 1992

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One of the best-known, most frequently performed of modern plays, displaying Ibsen's genius for realistic prose drama. A classic expression of women's rights, the play builds to a climax in which the central character, Nora, rejects a smothering marriage and life in "a doll's house." Publisher's Note. Contents. Dramatis Personae.
Henrik Ibsen, poet and playwright was born in Skein, Norway, in 1828. His creative work spanned 50 years, from 1849-1899, and included 25 plays and numerous poems. During his middle, romantic period (1840-1875), Ibsen wrote two important dramatic poems, Brand and Peer Gynt, while the period from 1875-1899 saw the creation of 11 realist...
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Title:A Doll's HouseFormat:PaperbackDimensions:80 pages, 8.25 × 5.19 × 0.68 inPublished:February 21, 1992Publisher:Dover Publications

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0486270629

ISBN - 13:9780486270623

Appropriate for ages: 14

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Customer Reviews of A Doll's House

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Lovely Work of Modern Drama A Doll's House was one of the three plays I was fortunate to read for English class this year, and I must say that it was just absolutely stunning and alluring. I have read about ten pieces of drama and this is one of the best for its different style of writing and subject matter. How often are we readers fortunate to read about a couple's crisis in the Victorian era in Norway? Never. Ever. After reading Ibsen's work, I feel more captivated to look into his other plays and see what he has in store for us. This can definitely be classified as modern drama, but it gives us the perspective of 1800s Europe before all of the violence and wars began. This was more about a couple's struggle in the sense of their marriage and social status. We spent about a week reading this relatively short play and analyzing it in my class and I didn't want to miss a second of it. In the beginning of the play, we are introduced to Nora and her husband Thorvald who are a well-off couple living in a Norwegian town. The whole play takes place in a span of a couple of days, and it is so raw and real. Ibsen was definitely not influenced by any of the modern topics (like technology) that we are surrounded with, so he told us a different story about a couple that we haven't been surrounded with before. The characters were absolutely my favourite part of the play. Everyone, including Nora, Thorvald, Mrs. Linde etc. etc. are so well planned-out and amazing. Each of them has their own emotions and qualities that they are specifically known for in the play. We feel their pains, their struggles, their desires... and this is the reason why I appreciate drama so much compared to novels. There are only a few books that actually have the ability to create this raw feeling. A Doll's House did that. And it's so creative too; just look at the title. Occasionally we find these basic titles that are pretty much meaningless for the whole novel/play. In this case, IT BRINGS OUT SO MANY THEMES that can be discussed for decades and millenniums.... and forever. The only thing I want is for a greater sense of background information in Thorvald and Nora's relationship. AND THE KIDS. AND THE MAID. We just need a sequel play, okay? A Doll's House is lovely. It's a work that I would want to come back to all the time and analyze the themes over and over again. In addition to Shakespeare and Hamilton and all of THOSE lovely plays, read this. NOW.
Date published: 2017-04-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautifully written The author portrayed women in Nora's era realistically. In a way, most people may find the behaviour of her husband appalling; however, it is true. It did happen and it may still happen. In modern society, we would like to think that we have evolved socially, but it still exists. I found this book excellent. Take a look at the movie Runaway Bride; Julia Robert's character changed her preference of eggs with each new fiancee, like the character Nora does with her interests. :) Go read it!
Date published: 2003-02-08
Rated 1 out of 5 by from DEGRADING I found this book degrading to all women. My female classmates along with myself could not stand the way Torvald acted towards his wife. All the little names he called Nora were not cute, they were degrading.I'll never read this play ever again. It made me furious to have to read a play like this. I was disappointed.
Date published: 2000-12-08

Employee Review

One of the best known, most frequently performed of modern plays, this classic demonstrates the author's pioneering, modern and realistic drama. Nora is a trapped housewife whose strength and determinism breaks through the stereotypical surface materialism and absent-mindedness of her era. Socialconformity and the human struggle are two of the many social themes appearing ahead of their time. Ibsen's characters are necessarily shallow, but readers will be impelled to read to the end. The setting and atmosphere are intriguing, and add layers to the world Ibsen represents. DIERDRE RATTIGANSMITHBOOKS #579, MONTREAL