A Floating Commonwealth: Politics, Culture, and Technology on Britains Atlantic Coast, 1860-1930

Paperback | June 3, 2012

byChristopher Harvie

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Christopher Harvie offers a new portrait of society and identity in high industrial Britain by focusing on the sea as connector, not barrier. Atlantic and 'inland sea' together, Harvie argues, created a 'floating commonwealth' of port cities and their hinterlands whose interaction, both withone another and with nationalist and imperial politics, created an intense political and cultural synergy. At a technical level, this produced the freight steamer and the efficient types of railways which opened up the developing world, as well as the institutions of international finance and communications in the age of 'telegrams and anger'. And ultimately, the resources of the Atlantic cities, theirshipyards and works, enabled Britain to win withstand the test of the First World War. Meanwhile, as Harvie shows, the continuous attempt to make sense of an ever-changing material reality also stimulated the discourses on which social criticism and literary modernism were based, from Carlyle to James Joyce - although the ultimate outcome, of slump and emigration, would leave enduringproblems in the years to come.

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Christopher Harvie offers a new portrait of society and identity in high industrial Britain by focusing on the sea as connector, not barrier. Atlantic and 'inland sea' together, Harvie argues, created a 'floating commonwealth' of port cities and their hinterlands whose interaction, both withone another and with nationalist and imperial...

Christopher Harvie was born in Motherwell, Scotland. He was Senior Lecturer in History at the Open University and is currently Professor of British Studies in the English Seminar of Tubingen University, Germany. He has been several times Director of Seminar and visiting fellow or guest professor at Merton and Nuffield Colleges, Oxford...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.07 inPublished:June 3, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199655189

ISBN - 13:9780199655182

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Table of Contents

Prelude: Behold The Sea!1. 'Behold The Sea!'2. 'The Writing and Acting of History'3. The Atlantic Moment4. Perspectives5. Nationalizing History6. Basins7. Covenants8. Mediations9. 'L'Invitation au Voyage'I Places and VoicesI.1 Sacred Lambencies and Thin Crusts: Culture, Danger and Industry1. Natura Maligna2. A Patriot for Whom?3. Auld Scotia - Who She?4. 'A Thin Crust'5. Enlightenment and Uncertainty6. GalateaI.2 Garron Top To Westward Ho!: The Inland Sea1. The Irish Boat2. A Country the Poets have Imagined3. 'The Antechamber of Britain'4. Money and Migrants5. 'Traffics and Discoveries'6. 'But Westward look!'7. Civic EmpiresI.3 McAndrew: The Engineer on the Celtic Fringe1. 'The Forgiving of the Anchor'2. The Uses of Rhetoric3. Breakthrough4. ves of the Engineers'5. 'Work and Question not'6. Prussians and AsiaticsII Ourselves TogetherII.1 Anglo-Saxons into Celts: The Scottish Intellectuals1. Enlightenment and Deception2. An Infinite Religious Idea3. Revivals4. Geddes and Synergy5. 'The Genius of the Gael'II.2 The Folk and the Gwerin: Religious Democracy in Scotland and Wales1. The Persistence of Faith2. State, Religion, People3. 'Godly Commonwealths'4. Religious Rebels5. The People's William6. Legacies7. Schools and SchoolmastersII.3 Contrary Heroes: Industry, Ethnie, and Ireland1. Measuring Distances: Ireland, Industry, and Theory2. 'Creative Chaos', Victims and Gastarbeiter3. Machines and Heroes4. Carlyle and Ireland: Positivist-Protestant5. Carlyle and Ireland: Celtic-Catholic6. The Ultramontane Opportunity7. Where were the Hero-Sisters?8. Hidden Ireland or Plain People?III In Time of the Breaking of NationsIII.1 Muscular Celticism: Sport and Nationalism1. Sport and Statehood2. Homo Ludens3. Sport and Sociologists4. The Civic Mode5. To the Tailteann Games6. Spieltrieb: a Diversion?III.2 John Bull's Other Irishman: Shaw, Geddes, and the Geotechnic Movement1. The View from Baker Street2. The Intelligent Fabian's West Britain3. The Road to Rosscullen4. Earthquake5. Passionate Dreaming6. 'Order the guns and kill!'III.3 Men Who Pushed and Went: West Coast Capitalism, War and Nationalism1. Frontism and Remembrance2. Expectations, Actualities, the Wizard: August 1914-April 19163. 'The Workshops are our Battlefield'4. From Reconstruction to Victory5. The University of Frongoch: Ireland EscapesIV Aftermath'Night's Candles Are Burned Out'1. Dynamic Forces2. Into the Doldrums3. 'A General Unsettlement'4. Inquests5. After Ireland6. American Dreams7. Nationalism Redux8. The Big Ship Goes Down9. Episodes, Epiphanies, Imperium?10. The 'O' on OlympianPrelude: Behold The Sea!I. 'Behold The Sea!'II. 'The Writing and Acting of History'III. The Atlantic MomentIV. PerspectivesV. Nationalizing HistoryVI. BasinsVII. CovenantsVIII. MediationsIX. 'L'Invitation au Voyage'I Places and VoicesI.1 Sacred Lambencies and Thin Crusts: Culture, Danger and IndustryI. Natura MalignaII. A Patriot for Whom?III. Auld Scotia - Who She?IV. 'A Thin Crust'V. Enlightenment and UncertaintyVI. GalateaI.2 Garron Top To Westward Ho!: The Inland SeaI. The Irish BoatII. A Country the Poets have ImaginedIII. 'The Antechamber of Britain'IV. Money and MigrantsV. 'Traffics and Discoveries'VI. 'But Westward look!'VII. Civic EmpiresI.3 McAndrew: The Engineer on the Celtic FringeI. 'The Forgiving of the Anchor'II. The Uses of RhetoricIII. BreakthroughIV. 'Lives of the Engineers'V. 'Work and Question not'VI. Prussians and AsiaticsII Ourselves TogetherII.1 Anglo-Saxons into Celts: The Scottish IntellectualsI. Enlightenment and DeceptionII. An Infinite Religious IdeaIII. RevivalsIV. Geddes and SynergyVII. 'The Genius of the Gael'II.2 The Folk and the Gwerin: Religious Democracy in Scotland and WalesI. The Persistence of FaithII. State, Religion, PeopleIII. 'Godly Commonwealths'IV. Religious RebelsV. The People's WilliamVI. LegaciesVII. Schools and SchoolmastersII.3 Contrary Heroes: Industry, Ethnie, and IrelandI. Measuring Distances: Ireland, Industry and TheoryII. 'Creative Chaos', Victims and GastarbeiterIII. Machines and HeroesIV. Carlyle and Ireland: Positivist-ProtestantV. Carlyle and Ireland: Celtic-CatholicVI. The Ultramontane OpportunityVII. Where were the Hero-Sisters?VIII. Hidden Ireland or Plain People?III In Time of the Breaking of NationsIII.1 Muscular Celticism: Sport and NationalismI. Sport and StatehoodII. Homo LudensIII. Sport and SociologistsIV. The Civic ModeV. To the Tailteann GamesVI. Spieltrieb: a Diversion?III.2 John Bull's Other Irishman: Shaw, Geddes, and the Geotechnic MovementI. The View from Baker StreetII. The Intelligent Fabian's West BritainIII. The Road to RosscullenIV. EarthquakeV. Passionate DreamingVI. 'Order the guns and kill!'III.3 Men Who Pushed and Went: West Coast Capitalism, War and NationalismI. Frontism and RemembranceII. Expectations, Actualities, the Wizard: August 1914-April 1916III. 'The Workshops are our Battlefield'IV. From Reconstruction to VictoryV. The University of Frongoch: Ireland escapesIV Aftermath'Night's Candles Are Burned Out'I. Dynamic ForcesII. Into the DoldrumsIII. 'A General Unsettlement'IV. InquestsV. After IrelandVI. American DreamsVII. Nationalism ReduxVIII. The Big Ship Goes DownIX. Episodes, Epiphanies, Imperium?X. The O' on Olympian

Editorial Reviews

"There is at all levels, a kind of elegiac poignancy to the book which only adds to its authority and its power. I recommend you read it twice, once at speed and without pause for the footnotes or to jot down the flurries of reference, and once with pencil and notebook at hand. Impossible tofault... its an intellectual masterwork and one of the most important books of the present decade." --Brian Morton, The Scottish Review of Books