A Glossary Of Yorkshire Words And Phrases; Collected In Whitby And The Neighbourhood. With Examples…

Paperback | February 2, 2012

byFrancis Kildale Robinson

not yet rated|write a review
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855. Excerpt: ... To Gnarl, to gnaw as a mouse. To Gnipe. See To Knep. Goak or Goke, the core of an apple. The fleshy substance in a large ulcer, likewise called "a sitfast." Also the centre of a haystack, or rather the stack as it stands pared round in use. Gob, the mouth. "To gie gob," to mouth, or give word, to abuse. "A raw gobb'd lad," a coarse countrified boy. To Gobble, to scold, or rather to reply with sullen impertinence to what has been remarked. Goblet-glass, a large drinking glass. Gobstring, a bridle. "He mun be hodden in wi' a tight gobstring," held in or put under strong restriction. The Go-by, or Gan-by, the pass-by, "the slip." Go Cab Ye! an imprecation with an "s" understood at the beginning of the middle word; as " may you be blistered all over!" Godden. "I give you godden," good day, good luck; or " God speed you." Godsharlh! God forbid! Godspenny, earnest money, generally half-a-crown given to a servant when hired. Goloshes, shoe coverings for wet weather. The word is said to be a comprisal of go-low-shoes. Good Friday or Passion Day, when our monks were wont "to creepe unto the crosse," is still a marked time for abstinence and devotion. The "hot cross bun" is eaten, but " the herb pudding," once usual here on this day, has gone into oblivion. The partaking of herbs seems to have reference to the ordinance of the Passover (Exodus, xii, 8), as the offering of Christ on the cross has been termed the Christian's Passover, the Old Testament sacrifice being the type. It was customary to make biscuits on Good Friday, to be kept throughout the year, for grating into milk or brandy-and-water, as a cure for diarrhoea; and if clothes are hung out to dry on that day, it is believed they will be taken down spotted with blood! A Goodish Few, or a Good Few. See Few...

Pricing and Purchase Info

$18.82

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855. Excerpt: ... To Gnarl, to gnaw as a mouse. To Gnipe. See To Knep. Goak or Goke, the core of an apple. The fleshy substance in a large ulcer...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:52 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.11 inPublished:February 2, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217669794

ISBN - 13:9780217669795

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of A Glossary Of Yorkshire Words And Phrases; Collected In Whitby And The Neighbourhood. With Examples Of Their Colloquial Use, And Allusions To Local Cu

Reviews