A Grammar Of Rhetoric, And Polite Literature; Comprehending The Principles Of Language And Style…

Paperback | July 9, 2012

byAlexander Jamieson

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...a comparison in the language of a spectator, descriptive of the attitude in which his agitation had placed him, without uttering a single sentiment of passion: " Fixt in astonishment, I gaze anon thoe, Like one just blasted by a stroke from heaven, Who pants for breath, and stiffens, yet alive la dreadful looks,--a monument of woe." Example 2. Lucia replies in the same language of description: " Oh! stop those sounds, Those killing sounds; why dost thou frown upon me? My blood runs cold, my heart forgets to heave, And life itself goes out at thy displeasure " y Analysis. One would imagine that the author of the Rehearsal had In view such unnatural composition. But we cannot help being surprised that Addison did not profit by his remarks. " Now here she must make a simile," says Mr. Bays. " Where's the necessity of that?" replies Mr. Smith. " Because she's surprised; that's a general rule; you must ever make a simile when you are surprised; 'tis the new way of writing." 289. But although such deliberate and highly-finished comparisons are inconsistent with every violent exertion of passion, yet short similes, adapted entirely to the purpose of illustration, may appear in the most passionate scenes: Ulus. There is scarcely a tragedy in any language, in which passion assumes so high a tone, and is so well supported, as in the Moor of Venice; and yet, in one of the most passionate scenes of that passionate tragedy, no reader can hesitate about the propriety of introducing two similes, besides several bold metaphors. Example. Othello thus deliberates, in the deepest agitation, about the murder of his wife, on account of her supposed infidelity: " It is the cause, my soul, Let me not name it to you, ye chaste stars! It if the cause;--yet I'll not shed...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...a comparison in the language of a spectator, descriptive of the attitude in which his agitation had placed him, without...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:134 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.29 inPublished:July 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217666620

ISBN - 13:9780217666626

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