A History of Chemical Theory From the Age of Lavoisier to the Present Time by Charles Adolphe WurtzA History of Chemical Theory From the Age of Lavoisier to the Present Time by Charles Adolphe Wurtz

A History of Chemical Theory From the Age of Lavoisier to the Present Time

byCharles Adolphe Wurtz

Paperback | January 16, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1869. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... basic, bibasic, and tribasic acids. In a memoir published in 1855 the author characterised nitrogen and phosphorus as tribasic elements. He even endeavoured to account for this capacity of combination by supposing that each atom of these elements was formed of three sub-atoms indissolubly united together, and each capable of replacing one atom of hydrogen. This substitution taking place in three molecules of water, the atom of phosphorus thus formed a link between these three molecules of water, which it riveted together in such a manner as to form phosphorous acid. Thus, not only was the atomicity of phosphorus and nitrogen clearly pointed out, but an attempt was even made to account for it by a hypothesis which has since been reproduced. Such was the origin of the theory of the atomicity of elements. In 1858 this theory made a decided step forward. Kekule, in an important memoir upon radicals,f broached the idea that carbon is a tetratomic radical; he was led to it by the consideration that in the simplest organic compounds, one atom of carbon is always united with a sum of elements equivalent to four atoms of hydrogen. It is thus in marsh gas, in perchloride of carbon, and in all the intermediate compounds containing both hydrogen and chlorine. Annates de Chimie et de Physique, 3&me s£rie, xliv. 306. t Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie, cvi. 129 (1858). These two elements are equivalent, since they replace one another atom for atom. In the compounds in question their sum is always equal to four. Similarly, in carbonic acid, the two atoms of oxygen combined with a single atom of carbon are equivalent to four atoms of hydrogen; for each of them has the power of uniting with or replacing two atoms of hydrogen. But, it will be said, one atom of carbon can co...
Title:A History of Chemical Theory From the Age of Lavoisier to the Present TimeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:68 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.14 inPublished:January 16, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217341071

ISBN - 13:9780217341073

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