A Hitler Youth In Poland: The Nazi Childrens Evacuation Program During World War II by Jost HermandA Hitler Youth In Poland: The Nazi Childrens Evacuation Program During World War II by Jost Hermand

A Hitler Youth In Poland: The Nazi Childrens Evacuation Program During World War II

byJost Hermand

Paperback | January 14, 1998

Pricing and Purchase Info

$30.39 online 
$36.00 list price save 15%
Earn 152 plum® points
HURRY, ONLY 1 LEFT!
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Jost Hermand's A Hitler Youth in Poland is an invaluable first-hand account of his experience in Nazi education camps for German children, four in Poland. An important addition to the growing record of the childhood experiences of so-called Kriegskinder (children of war) in Germany during the Nazi regime, A Hitler Youth in Poland is a memoir of Germany's Kinderlandverschickung (KLV) program, by which German children were evacuated from large cities to countryside camps designed to toughen and prepare them for future careers in the military.

During the Nazi era, millions of German children between the ages of seven and sixteen were taken from their homes and sent to Hitler Youth paramilitary camps to be toughened up and taught how to be "German." Separated from their families and sent to the far-flung corners of Europe, these children often endured incredible abuse by the adults in charge. In this memoir, Jost Hermand, a cultural critic and historian who spent much of his youth in five different camps, writes about his experiences as a small, unathletic boy thrown into a "wolf pack" governed by brutalization, dreary routine, and sadism.

Intelligent and persuasive, A Hitler Youth in Poland should be read by anyone interested in psychology or the history of everyday life in Hitler's Germany and the mental scars of adults born during the Nazi regime.
Jost Hermand was born in Kassel, Germany, in 1930.  The William F. Vilas Research Professor of German at the University of Wisconsin, he has also taught at Harvard University, the University of Texas, University of Berlin, and six other German universities.  He has written or edited twelve books.  Margot Bettauer Dembo, an editor with ...
Loading
Title:A Hitler Youth In Poland: The Nazi Childrens Evacuation Program During World War IIFormat:PaperbackDimensions:184 pages, 8 × 5 × 0.6 inPublished:January 14, 1998Publisher:Northwestern University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0810112922

ISBN - 13:9780810112926

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Difficulties of Reappraising a Traumatic Experience

After the First Air Raids
KLV Camp Kirchenpopowo in the Warthegau
(Warthe District)

The Führer's Act of Generosity
The KLV Camp in San Remo, Italy

The Renewed Evacuation of Most City Children
KLV Camp Gross-Ottingen in the Warthegau

Preliminary Training
SS Ski-training on the Hohe Eule in Silesia

Epidemics and the First Protests
KLV Camp Gross Ottingen in the Warthegau

The Last Stand
KLV Camp Sulmierschütz in the Warthegau

Return and Readjustment
Rauischholzhausen and Kassel

Epilogue
A Journey into the Past

Notes

From Our Editors

Between 1933 and 1945, millions of German children between the ages of seven and sixteen were taken from their homes and sent to Hitler Youth paramilitary camps to be toughened up and taught how to be "German". Separated from their families and sent to far-away away places like Denmark, Latvia, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and occupied Poland, these children often endured incredible abuse by the adults in charge. In this memoir, Jost Hermand, a distinguished German cultural critic and historian who spent much of his youth in five different camps, writes about his experiences during this period. After reviewing what others have published about the camps and explaining why previous romanticized views must be corrected, Hermand provides background into the creation and development of the camps. He then devotes one chapter apiece to each of the five different camps to which he was sent: Kirchenpopowo, San Remo, Gross Ottingen, Silesia, and Sulmierschutz. Each was quite different from the other, he writes, and almost every form of behavior existed at each place.The children did sometimes find, with certain adults, parental solicitude, belief in the inherent goodness of human beings, and naive idealism, but by and large they encountered fascistic indoctrination, dreary routine, conscious brutalization, and the worst sort of sadism. In the two final chapters, Hermand focuses on the postwar consequences of his camp experiences for his own development, and his return visit in 1991 to some of the sites. In these chapters, as in the rest of the book, Hermand carefully and skillfully combines his personal story with an analysis of the overall purpose of the camps. An intelligent and persuasive document, this book should be read by anyone interested in psychology, the history of everyday life, and in the story of Germany under Hitler

Editorial Reviews

"It is his unflinching honesty that makes Hermand's slim memoir valuable." —Publishers Weekly