A Home for Every Child: The Washington Children's Home Society in the Progressive Era by Patricia Susan HartA Home for Every Child: The Washington Children's Home Society in the Progressive Era by Patricia Susan Hart

A Home for Every Child: The Washington Children's Home Society in the Progressive Era

byPatricia Susan Hart

Hardcover | July 20, 2015

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Adoption has been a politically charged subject since the Progressive Era, when it first became an established part of child welfare reform. In A Home for Every Child, Patricia Susan Hart looks at how, when, and why modern adoption practices became a part of child welfare policy.

The Washington Children?s Home Society (now the Children?s Home Society of Washington) was founded in 1896 to place children into adoptive and foster homes as a means of dealing with child abuse, neglect, and homelessness. Hart reveals why birth parents relinquished their children to the Society, how adoptive parents embraced these vulnerable family members, and how the children adjusted to their new homes among strangers.

Debates about nature versus nurture, fears about immigration, and anxieties about race and class informed child welfare policy during the Progressive Era. Hart sheds new light on that period of time and the social, cultural, and political factors that affected adopted children, their parents, and administrators of pioneering institutions like the Washington Children?s Home Society.

Patricia Susan Hart is associate professor of journalism and American studies at the University of Idaho.
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Title:A Home for Every Child: The Washington Children's Home Society in the Progressive EraFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:July 20, 2015Publisher:University of Washington Press and Autry National Center of the American WestLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295996846

ISBN - 13:9780295996844

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Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: Taking a Chance on the Pacific Northwest

1. Seeking Alternatives to Institutional Care

2. Child Relinquishment: The Last Best Hope

3. Sorted, Boarded, and Reformed: Coming into the Care of WCHS

4. Completing God's Plan and Competing Desires: Negotiating Adoptive Parenthood

5. Biology, Botany, and Belonging

6. Traveling Children: Placement, Re-placement, and Return

Conclusion: A Home for Every Child: The Elusive Promise

AppendixNotesSelected BibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Adoption has been a politically charged subject since the Progressive Era, when it first became an established part of child welfare reform. In A Home for Every Child, Patricia Susan Hart looks at how, when, and why modern adoption practices became a part of child welfare policy.The Washington Children?s Home Society (now the Children?s Home Society of Washington) was founded in 1896 to place children into adoptive and foster homes as a means of dealing with child abuse, neglect, and homelessness. Hart reveals why birth parents relinquished their children to the Society, how adoptive parents embraced these vulnerable family members, and how the children adjusted to their new homes among strangers.Debates about nature versus nurture, fears about immigration, and anxieties about race and class informed child welfare policy during the Progressive Era. Hart sheds new light on that period of time and the social, cultural, and political factors that affected adopted children, their parents, and administrators of pioneering institutions like the Washington Children?s Home Society.The compelling stories in A Home for Every Child testify at once to the irresistible allure of reform and the stubborn centrality of poverty in the history of adoption and social welfare. - Ellen Herman, author of Kinship by Design: a History of Adoption in the Modern United States