A Just Zionism: On the Morality of the Jewish State

Paperback | August 15, 2011

byChaim Gans

not yet rated|write a review
The legitimacy of the Zionist project - establishing a Jewish homeland in Palestine - has been questioned since its inception. In recent years, the voices challenging the legitimacy of the State of Israel have become even louder. Chaim Gans examines these doubts and presents an in-depth,evenhanded philosophical analysis of the justice of Zionism.Today, alongside a violent Middle East where many refuse to accept Israel's existence, there are two academically respectable arguments for the injustice of Zionism. One claim is that the very return of the Jews to Palestine was unjust. The second argument is that Zionism is an exclusivistethnocultural nationalism out of step with current visions of multicultural nationhood. While many therefore claim that Zionism is in principle an unjust political philosophy, Gans seeks out a more nuanced ground to explain why Zionism, despite its manifest flaws, could in principle be just. Itsflaws stem from the current situation, where exigencies have distorted its implementation, and from historical forces that have ended up favoring an extreme form of Jewish hegemony. For Gans, the justice of Zionism and of Israel are not black-and-white propositions. Rather, they are projects in needof repair, which can be achieved by reconceptualizing the Jews' relationship with the Palestinian population and by adhering to a significantly more limited version of Jewish hegemony.Ultimately, A Just Zionism offers a concrete, historically and geographically rooted investigation of the limits of contemporary nationalism in one of the world's most fraught cases.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$35.50

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The legitimacy of the Zionist project - establishing a Jewish homeland in Palestine - has been questioned since its inception. In recent years, the voices challenging the legitimacy of the State of Israel have become even louder. Chaim Gans examines these doubts and presents an in-depth,evenhanded philosophical analysis of the justice ...

Chaim Gans is Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University and a political philosopher. The author of The Limits of Nationalism, he focuses on the philosophical analysis of politics and public affairs.

other books by Chaim Gans

The Limits of Nationalism
The Limits of Nationalism

Kobo ebook|Feb 1 1999

$37.39 online$48.56list price(save 23%)
A Political Theory for the Jewish People
A Political Theory for the Jewish People

Kobo ebook|Dec 7 2015

$48.99

Format:PaperbackDimensions:178 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 0.59 inPublished:August 15, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199812063

ISBN - 13:9780199812066

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of A Just Zionism: On the Morality of the Jewish State

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction1. Zionism as an Ethnocultural Nationalism1. Zionism, Ethnoculturalism, and Civic Nationalism2. "Bad" Nationalism and "Good" Nationalisms3. Cosmopolitan and Neutralist Objections to Nationalism2. The Jews' Return to the Historical Homeland1. Interpretations of Historical Rights2. Historical Rights and Selecting the Site for Self-Determination3. The Persecution of the Jews4. Responding to Arab Opposition to Zionism3. A Jewish State: Self-Determination and Hegemony1. Jewish Hegemony and the Right to National Self-Determination2. The Prevalence of Nation-States, the Persecution of the Jews, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict4. Dividing Up the Historical Homeland1. Demography and the Palestinian Right of Return2. The Issue of Territorial Division and the 1967 Borders5. Jewish Hegemony in Immigration and Other Domains1. Nationality-Based Immigration and Racism2. Self-Determination and the Nationality-Based Priorities in Immigration3. Immigration to Israel: All Jews and Only Jews4. Principles for Nationality-Based Priorities in Immigration5. Other Means for Achieving Demographic Objectives6. Hegemony in Areas Other Than DemographyConclusion