A late discourse made in a solemne assembly of nobles and learned men at Montpellier in France by Kenelm DigbyA late discourse made in a solemne assembly of nobles and learned men at Montpellier in France by Kenelm Digby

A late discourse made in a solemne assembly of nobles and learned men at Montpellier in France

byKenelm Digby

Paperback | May 5, 2014

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1664 edition. Excerpt: ...if you put only a scruple more, it will leave it entire in the bottom, as if it were senior plaister; neverthelesse, it will diisolve a good quantity of salt of N ure, and though it will touch no more of this salt.it will dissolve as much of Armoniacalsalt, and so others of diffe rent figurcs.Inibmuch as lhave observed elsewhere, we see plainly by the (economy Jof nature,'that bodies of the fame figure use to mingle more strongly,. strongly, and unite themselves with more facility, which is the reason why those that make a strong glue to glue together broken pots of Porcelain, or Crystal, or such stuff, do always mingle with the glue the powder of that body which they endeavour to reunite: And the Goldsmiths themselves, when they go about to solder together pieces of gold, or of silver, they mingle thole bodies always in their own dust. Having hitherto run through the reasons an4 causes why bodies of the fame nature draw one to another with greater facility and force than others, and why they unite with more promptitude, lets now fee, according to our methed,' how experience confirms this discourse, for in natural things we must have our last recourse to experience. And all reasoning that is net supported so, ought to be repudiated, or at least suspected, to be illegitimate. 'Tis-ani ordinary thing, when one finds finds himself burnt as in the hand, he holds it a good while as near the fire as he can, and by this means the ignited aromes of the fire, and of the hand mingling together, and: drawing one another, and the stron gerofthe two, which are those of the fire, having the mastery, the hand finds it self much eased of the inflammation which it suffered. Tis an ordinary remedy, though a nasty one, that they who have ill breaths hold...
Title:A late discourse made in a solemne assembly of nobles and learned men at Montpellier in FranceFormat:PaperbackDimensions:26 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.05 inPublished:May 5, 2014Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1231397918

ISBN - 13:9781231397916

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