A Letter To His Excellency; The Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland, On The Judgment Of The High Court Of Delegates In The Case Of Talbot V. Talbot by Thomas Tertius PagetA Letter To His Excellency; The Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland, On The Judgment Of The High Court Of Delegates In The Case Of Talbot V. Talbot by Thomas Tertius Paget

A Letter To His Excellency; The Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland, On The Judgment Of The High Court Of…

byThomas Tertius Paget

Paperback | January 7, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1856. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... Ireland, the counsel for Mr. Talbot, who produces him as a witness as "a very great scoundrel;" by Dr. Gayer (another of Mr. Talbot's counsel) as "the wretched Michael Halloran;" in the judicial language of the Consistory Court, as "an unprincipled and un-" "scrupulous man;" and the High Court of Delegates, after describing him as "a man whose character, stamped with the features of" "infamy and disgrace, renders him incredible in a court of justice," emphatically "puts the seal of condemnation upon his testimony." His ally, Finnerty, is proved to be scarcely less infamous. He admits that he forged a letter for Halloran under the assumed name of Dennis Delaney, and swears that he saw Mullane "look in at a window," the sill of which was proved to be seven feet from the ground, and to patch up this perjury swears that the height of the window was about four or five feet, and is proved by Hester Keogh (a housemaid in Mr. Talbot's service, and a witness produced by him) to have attempted to suborn her to "swear false" against her mistress. Upon the alleged detection of Mrs. Talbot in the room of Mullane she is forthwith consigned by her husband to the charge of her two brutal accusers. Her child, which she had by the hand, is torn from her, and she is taken to her bedroom, where she is kept by force, during the remainder of that day and the whole of the following night, and in spite of her struggles to get to her husband and child. Mr. Talbot having first carefully "left in a piece of paper a" "very small (and insufficient for one meal) portion of tea for Mrs." "Talbot, and a few lumps of sugar,"* and paid Mullane's wages to the odd shilling, leaves the house, passes the night at the neighbouring residence of his agent, and then goes at once to Dublin to ta...
Title:A Letter To His Excellency; The Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland, On The Judgment Of The High Court Of…Format:PaperbackDimensions:42 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.09 inPublished:January 7, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217664091

ISBN - 13:9780217664097

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