A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Volume III.B: Central Greece: From the Megarid to Thessaly by P. M. FraserA Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Volume III.B: Central Greece: From the Megarid to Thessaly by P. M. Fraser

A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Volume III.B: Central Greece: From the Megarid to Thessaly

EditorP. M. Fraser, Elaine Matthews

Hardcover | September 15, 2000

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The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, a major project of the British Academy, offers scholars a fully documented listing of all known personal names from the ancient Greek world. It draws on all the available evidence, primarily inscriptions but also literature, papyri, coins, vases and otherartefacts; chronologically it ranges from the earliest times (though excluding Mycenean names) to about AD 600. It has benefited from the collaboration of scholars in many countries. It is intended to form the basis of a wide range of historical, philological, and literary research. The present volume, III.B, contains the onomastic material from Central Greece, comprising Phocis, Locris, Doris, Boeotia with Megara, and Thessaly. It continues the series begun with volume I, The Aegean Islands, Cyprus, and Cyrenaica, volume II, Attica, and volume III.A The Peloponnese, WesternGreece, Magna Graecia, and Sicily.
P.M. Fraser and E. Matthews are the general editors of the series.
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Title:A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Volume III.B: Central Greece: From the Megarid to ThessalyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:500 pages, 12.09 × 9.17 × 1.85 inPublished:September 15, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198152930

ISBN - 13:9780198152934

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

`One of the useful features is that the cross-references are reciprocal, particularly useful if the name in its original form is dialectal and the reader wishes to know the standard form'Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.09.34