A life course approach to womens health

Paperback | October 1, 2002

EditorDiana Kuh, Rebecca Hardy

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How far is the health of middle aged and older women shaped by biological, social, and psychological processes that begin in pre-natal development, childhood, adolescence, or early adult life? Do health risks gradually accumulate over the life course or do experiences as a child and youngadult have interactive effects on health in midlife and beyond? Are women now reaching middle age in better health than previous generations? A group of international experts critically review the latest scientific evidence on biological and social factors at each stage of life that have long-termeffects on reproductive outcomes, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, musculoskeletal ageing, depression, body weight and body dissatisfaction. There is growing evidence that the sources of risk to physical and mental health occur across the course of life, not just in adult life, andin some instances reach right back to pre-natal development, or the previous generation. Contributors draw on their varied expertise in epidemiology, endocrinology, physiology, developmental psychology, sociology, and anthropology to identify the pathways that link early life experiences,reproductive events, adult lifestyle and lifetime socio-economic circumstances to later health. A Life Course Approach looks for connections between development and ageing, and between the childhood and adult social environment. It is scientifically interesting, conceptually and methodologicallychallenging, inherently interdisciplinary, and policy relevant. This thoughtful book will appeal to all with a professional or personal interest in understanding the origins of women's health.

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How far is the health of middle aged and older women shaped by biological, social, and psychological processes that begin in pre-natal development, childhood, adolescence, or early adult life? Do health risks gradually accumulate over the life course or do experiences as a child and youngadult have interactive effects on health in midl...

Diana Kuh is a Senior Research Scientist, Medical Research Council and Reader, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London. Rebecca Hardy is a Research Scientist, Medical Research Council and Lecturer, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College, London.

other books by Diana Kuh

A Life Course Approach to Healthy Ageing
A Life Course Approach to Healthy Ageing

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9.45 × 6.61 × 0.91 inPublished:October 1, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192632892

ISBN - 13:9780192632890

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Table of Contents

Part I: Introduction1.1. Diana Kuh and Rebecca Hardy: A life course approach to women's health: does the past predict the present?Part II: Health, Ageing and Disease2.1. Janet Rich-Edwards: A life course approach to women's reproductive health2.2. Susan Morton: Commentary3.1. Isabel dos Santos Silva and Bianca L De Stavola: Breast cancer aetiology: where do we go from here?3.2. Nancy Potischman: Commentary4.1. Rebecca Hardy and Diana Kuh: Menopause and gynaecological disorders: a life course perspective4.2. Sybil Crawford and Catherine Johannes: Commentary5.1. Debbie Lawlor, Shah Ebrahim and George Davey Smith: A life course approach to coronary heart disease and stroke5.2. Catherine Law: Commentary6.1. Helen M Colhoun and Nish Chaturvedi: A life course approach to Diabetes6.2. Janet Rich-Edwards: Commentary7.1. Joan Bassey, Avan Aihie Sayer and Cyrus Cooper: A life course approach to musculoskeletal ageing: muscle strength, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis7.2. Jane Cauley: Commentary8.1. Barbara Maughan: Depression and psychological distress: a life course perspective8.2. Bryan Rodgers: Commentary9.1. Lindsay McLaren and Jane Wardle: Body image: a life course perspective9.2. J Kevin Thompson: CommentaryPart III: Biological, Social and Psychosocial Pathways10.1. Carol M Worthman: Endocrine pathways in differential and well-being across the life course10.2. Elizabeth Barrett-Connor: Commentary11.1. Mel Bartley, Amanda Sacker and Ingrid Schoon: Social and economic trajectories and women's health11.2. Kate Hunt: Commentary12.1. Nadine F Marks and Kirsty Ashleman: Life course influences on women's social relationships at midlife12.2. Stephen Stansfield and Rebecca Fuhrer: Commentary13.1. Mary Schooling and Diana Kuh: A life course perspective on women's health behaviours13.2. Hilary Graham: Commentary14.1. Chris Power and Tessa Parsons: Overweight and obesity from a life course perspective14.2. William H Dietz: Commentary15.1. Ronald H Gray, Maria J Wawer and David Serwadda: Sexually transmitted infections and health through the life course15.2. Andrew J Hall: CommentaryPart IV: Explaining Health and Disease Patterns16.1. Diana Kuh, Isabel dos Santos Silva and Elizabeth Barrett-Connor: Disease trends in women living in established market economies: evidence of cohort effects during the epidemiological transition16.2. Dave A Leon: Commentary17.1. Zena Stein, Quarraisha Abdool Karim and Mervyn Susser: The life course of black women in South Africa in the 1990s: generation, age and period in the decade of HIV and political liberation17.2. Yoav Ben-Shlomo and George Davey Smith: CommentaryPart V: Conclusions18.1. Diana Kuh and Rebecca Hardy: A life course approach to Women's health: linking the past, present and future

Editorial Reviews

"Diana Kuh and Rebecca Hardy are to be congratulated-they have done a fabulous job with this book. Their breadth of vision and the depth of coverage in the chapters make this book potentially attractive to several audiencesthe book is comprehensive, intellectually stimulating, and well organized, and offers a wealth of resources on life course approaches to women's health." -International Journal of Epidemiology"I can only conclude that this 5-star volume should be required reading for everyone who has any association with and concern for women and their health."--Journal of the British Menopause Society"Epidemiologists will find the data essential...ÝT¨his book is a fountain of wisdom with a world view of evidence-based data on women's health past, present and future."--Family Practice"This is a comprehensive review of how lifelong risk factors affect women's health in a host of positive and negative ways. Practitioners with a strong interest in epidemiology will find the book quite fascinating."--Doody's