A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue ParkA Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park

A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story

byLinda Sue Park, Ginger Knowlton

Paperback | June 1, 2012

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The New York Times bestseller A Long Walk to Water begins as two stories, told in alternating sections, about two eleven-year-olds in Sudan, a girl in 2008 and a boy in 1985. The girl, Nya, is fetching water from a pond that is two hours' walk from her home: she makes two trips to the pond every day. The boy, Salva, becomes one of the lost boys" of Sudan, refugees who cover the African continent on foot as they search for their families and for a safe place to stay. Enduring every hardship from loneliness to attack by armed rebels to contact with killer lions and crocodiles, Salva is a survivor, and his story goes on to intersect with Nya's in an astonishing and moving way."
Linda Sue Park is the author of the Newbery Medal book A Single Shard and bestseller A Long Walk to Water . She has also written several acclaimed picture books, fiction and nonfiction, and is a founding member of We Need Diverse Books. She lives in Rochester, New York, with her family. Visit her online at lspark.com and on Twitter @...
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Title:A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True StoryFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:128 pages, 7.63 × 7.68 × 0.39 inShipping dimensions:7.63 × 7.68 × 0.39 inPublished:June 1, 2012Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0547577311

ISBN - 13:9780547577319

Appropriate for ages: 10

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book! My students loved this book and were shocked by the ending. It is a quick read but so rich with possible discussion topics and learning outcomes. There are lots of resources online such as interviews with the author and main character. The fact this is a true story makes it hit even closer to home and will help you appreciate the simple things in life like being able to turn on your tap and get fresh, clean water. Will continue reading to my classes in the future.
Date published: 2018-08-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Inspiring Inspiring story for youth. Very humbling. Good book for privileged youth to read to understand the struggles their counterparts in undeveloped countries have to endure for basic survival and enlighten on the importance of protecting natural resources for future generations. Really gets you thinking about how much we take for granted a clean glass of water, and how wasteful we are.
Date published: 2018-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from inspiring story Based/ inspired by a true story, it is a very humbling story to read through- reliving the perseverance of children, and their strength to overcome that which we do not think them capable of at times. But like any great leader, they all had to start somewhere. This is a story of people who many never make the headlines, or the front page, the history textbooks, or into a conversation you have with someone. But it should. Because how quickly history passes us, and wars accumulating only to be forgotten by generations of people. There is also the matter of how important water is for one’s survival. A resource we take for granted, coming from a water ’abundant’ country, it remains the one thing that hours are dedicated to sourcing. We may critique development and provision of infrastructure as hegemonic, but there is a need to relieve the anthro-imposed scarcity experienced in the first place. In the case of this book, we can see the parallel structured of a girl doing a traditional chore of fetching water, and the path crossed later with an ‘aid’ worker who had experienced dehydration in his life previously. One may think that development workers can never truly understand field situations, but chances are, there is someone who does, someone who can go beyond empathizing. And it is part of our job to step aside and let them articulate what needs to get done. Another underlying theme that is of importance and interest is that ‘tribal conflict’ is transcended by the right to water- an understanding that should be showcased more often. In the present, a good idea for discussion would be to talk about the debates around the privatization of water by transnational companies. We could also discuss the emergence and re-emergence of Sudan finding itself into scarce times- this time being famine
Date published: 2018-06-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Inspiring Heart-breaking story. I can't believe that this could really be happening to someone. Inspiring ending.
Date published: 2018-04-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from True Story It's sad that many people have to go through this. Nice ending
Date published: 2018-03-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Trial and reconcilliation Heart breaking and inspiring. I pre-read this book and will be assigning it for my 10 yo dgtr to read this spring when we do a unit on africa.
Date published: 2018-01-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park Quick read good for multiple ability levels.This book should be an easy inclusion into 7th grade Geography, 6th grade world history, or as an addition to a Holocaust unit. This is how I plan to use it with my 7th grade reading teacher. For younger readers, this book may encourage a class to adopt a project to help bring water to children their age in other places in the world.Book is told from two viewpoints. One is a girl walking each day to get the water her family needs which she carries home in plastic gallon jugs. The trip takes her all day and while not mentioned in the story, this could be a dangerous trip for her. The second viewpoint is from a boy in the 80's who is at school when his village is attacked. He runs into the woods and that is the last of his childhood of living with family or a village. He is in fact one of the Lost Boys. The two stories come together in an upbeat ending meant to inspire the reader to make a better world.
Date published: 2017-12-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park Quick read good for multiple ability levels.This book should be an easy inclusion into 7th grade Geography, 6th grade world history, or as an addition to a Holocaust unit. This is how I plan to use it with my 7th grade reading teacher. For younger readers, this book may encourage a class to adopt a project to help bring water to children their age in other places in the world.Book is told from two viewpoints. One is a girl walking each day to get the water her family needs which she carries home in plastic gallon jugs. The trip takes her all day and while not mentioned in the story, this could be a dangerous trip for her. The second viewpoint is from a boy in the 80's who is at school when his village is attacked. He runs into the woods and that is the last of his childhood of living with family or a village. He is in fact one of the Lost Boys. The two stories come together in an upbeat ending meant to inspire the reader to make a better world.
Date published: 2017-12-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park Quick read good for multiple ability levels.This book should be an easy inclusion into 7th grade Geography, 6th grade world history, or as an addition to a Holocaust unit. This is how I plan to use it with my 7th grade reading teacher. For younger readers, this book may encourage a class to adopt a project to help bring water to children their age in other places in the world.Book is told from two viewpoints. One is a girl walking each day to get the water her family needs which she carries home in plastic gallon jugs. The trip takes her all day and while not mentioned in the story, this could be a dangerous trip for her. The second viewpoint is from a boy in the 80's who is at school when his village is attacked. He runs into the woods and that is the last of his childhood of living with family or a village. He is in fact one of the Lost Boys. The two stories come together in an upbeat ending meant to inspire the reader to make a better world.
Date published: 2017-12-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Inspiring Wonderful story to be enjoyed by readers of all ages.
Date published: 2017-10-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Must Read I LOVED this book. I read it in a day and afterwards, shared it with my fifth grade students. I put a post it in the book on the page before things got really sad so a few of my girls skipped reading about the saddest part of the book but left loving the overall story. So worth reading and a book that really stays with you after you are done.
Date published: 2017-07-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great! Weaves two stories together and is very easy to follow. Great for kids and adults too! Awesome read would highly recommend
Date published: 2017-04-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great social justice read for tweens This is a great novel that I use in my social justice unit with my students. The novel weaves two stories together, teaching readers about the plight of those living in Sudan during the 1980s and late 2000s. My students quite enjoy it and parents like that is helps to spur conversation (albeit sometimes challenging) about world history/events, war, and injustice.
Date published: 2017-03-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Lost 'Boys' of Sudan Excellent novel for kids 10+, about the lost children of Sudan. Moving, without being overwhelming. For those 13+, consider following up with a documentary or 'The Good Lie', with Reese Witherspoon (although this has an unfortunate and unnecessary scene with her in bed with a boyfriend - this can be skipped).
Date published: 2017-01-26

Editorial Reviews

There have been several books about the lost boys of Sudan for adults, teens, and even for elementary-school readers. But [this] spare, immediate account, based on a true story, adds a stirring contemporary dimension. . . . Young readers will be stunned by the triumphant climax." - Booklist, starred review "[This] spare, hard-hitting novel delivers a memorable portrait of two children in Sudan. . . . Tragic and harrowing."- Publishers Weekly, starred review "Two narratives intersect in a quiet conclusion that is filled with hope."- School Library Journal, starred review "This powerful dual narrative packs suspense and introspection into Park's characteristic spare description; while there are lots of details offered to the reader, they come not in long, prosaic lines but in simple, detached observations. Both Salva's and Nya's stories are told with brutal, simple honesty, and they deliver remarkable perspective on the Sudanese conflict. The novel's brevity and factual basis makes the reality of life in Sudan very accessible, and readers will find both the story and the style extremely moving."- The Bulletin "Park simply yet convincingly depicts the chaos of war and an unforgiving landscape. . . . A heartfelt account."- Kirkus Reviews "Brilliant. . . . A touching narrative about strife and survival on a scale most American readers will never see."- Book Page "Riveting."- The Horn Book "[A] fast, page-turning read. . . . A great book for high school students and an important novel for young adults who enjoy learning about other world cultures."- VOYA "