A Middle Class Without Democracy: Economic Growth and the Prospects for Democratization in China

Paperback | May 13, 2014

byJie Chen

not yet rated|write a review
What kind of role can the middle class play in potential democratization in such an undemocratic, late developing country as China? To answer this profound political as well as theoretical question, Jie Chen explores attitudinal and behavioral orientation of China's new middle class todemocracy and democratization. Chen's work is based on a unique set of data collected from a probability-sample survey and in-depth interviews of residents in three major Chinese cities, Beijing, Chengdu and Xi'an - each of which represents a distinct level of economic development in urban China -in 2007 and 2008. The empirical findings derived from this data set confirm that (1) compared to other social classes, particularly lower classes, the new Chinese middle class - especially those employed in the state apparatus - tends to be more supportive of the current Party-state but lesssupportive of democratic values and institutions; (2) the new middle class's attitudes toward democracy may be accounted for by this class's close ideational and institutional ties with the state, and its perceived socioeconomic wellbeing, among other factors; (3) the lack of support for democracyamong the middle class tends to cause this social class to act in favor of the current state but in opposition to democratic changes. The most important political implication is that while China's middle class is not likely to serve as the harbinger of democracy now, its current attitudes toward democracy may change in the future. Such a crucial shift in the middle class's orientation toward democracy can take place, especiallywhen its dependence on the Party-state decreases and perception of its own social and economic statuses turns pessimistic. The key theoretical implication from the findings suggests that the attitudinal and behavioral orientations of the middle class-as a whole and as a part-toward democratic changein late developing countries are contingent upon its with the incumbent state and its perceived social/economic wellbeing, and the middle class's support for democracy in these countries is far from inevitable.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$35.50

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

What kind of role can the middle class play in potential democratization in such an undemocratic, late developing country as China? To answer this profound political as well as theoretical question, Jie Chen explores attitudinal and behavioral orientation of China's new middle class todemocracy and democratization. Chen's work is based...

Jie Chen is William Borah Distinguished Professor of Political Science, serves as Dean of the College of Graduate Studies at University of Idaho. He also holds the titles of the Changjiang Scholar Chair Professorship and Zhiyuan Chair Professorship bestowed, respectively, by the Ministry of Education, PRC, and by Shanghai Jiaotong Uni...

other books by Jie Chen

The Future of Public Housing: Ongoing Trends in the East and the West
The Future of Public Housing: Ongoing Trends in the Eas...

Kobo ebook|Dec 26 2013

$101.39 online$131.64list price(save 22%)
see all books by Jie Chen
Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:May 13, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199385610

ISBN - 13:9780199385614

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of A Middle Class Without Democracy: Economic Growth and the Prospects for Democratization in China

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Tables and FiguresPrefaceList of Abbreviations1. Introduction: The Contingent Middle Class2. China's Middle Class: Definition and Evolution3. How Does the Middle Class View Democracy and the Government?4. Why Does or Does Not the Middle Class Support Democracy?5. The Impact of Democratic Support on the Middle Class's Political Behavior6. Conclusion: Contingent Democratic Supporters and Prospects for DemocracyAppendix: List of In-Depth Interviews Conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, and Xi'an in 2008ReferencesIndex