A Natural History of Pragmatism: The Fact of Feeling from Jonathan Edwards to Gertrude Stein by Joan RichardsonA Natural History of Pragmatism: The Fact of Feeling from Jonathan Edwards to Gertrude Stein by Joan Richardson

A Natural History of Pragmatism: The Fact of Feeling from Jonathan Edwards to Gertrude Stein

byJoan Richardson

Paperback | January 15, 2007

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Joan Richardson provides a fascinating and compelling account of the emergence of the quintessential American philosophy: pragmatism. She demonstrates pragmatism's engagement with various branches of the natural sciences and traces the development of Jamesian pragmatism from the late nineteenth century through modernism, following its pointings into the present. Richardson combines strands from America's religious experience with scientific information to offer interpretations that break new ground in literary and cultural history. This book exemplifies the value of interdisciplinary approaches to producing literary criticism. In a series of highly original readings of Edwards, Emerson, William and Henry James, Stevens, and Stein, A Natural History of Pragmatism tracks the interplay of religious motive, scientific speculation, and literature in shaping an American aesthetic. Wide-ranging and bold, this groundbreaking book will be essential reading for all students and scholars of American literature.
Title:A Natural History of Pragmatism: The Fact of Feeling from Jonathan Edwards to Gertrude SteinFormat:PaperbackDimensions:346 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.83 inPublished:January 15, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521694507

ISBN - 13:9780521694506

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: frontier instances; 2. In Jonathan Edwards's room of the idea; 3. Emerson's moving pictures; 4. William James's feeling of if; 5. Henry James's more than rational distortion; 6. Wallace Stevens's radiant and productive atmosphere; 7. Gertrude Stein, James's Melancthon/a; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Richardson reads the subjects of her history well, and this work is amarvelous introduction to Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William James, Henry James, Wallace Stevens, and Gertrude Stein." - Steven Schroeder, Chicago, Illinois Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas