A New History of Ireland, Volume V: Ireland Under the Union, I: 1801-1870 by W. E. Vaughan

A New History of Ireland, Volume V: Ireland Under the Union, I: 1801-1870

EditorW. E. Vaughan

Paperback | February 15, 2010

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A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages,down to the present day. Volume V opens with a character study of the period, followed by twenty chapters of narrative history, covering sectarian conflict, politics of the era and the impact of the Great Famine. Further thematic chapters examine emigration, the economy, legal developments, literature, and education, endingwith a study of Ireland in 1870.

About The Author

W. E. Vaughan is Senior Lecturer in History at Trinity College Dublin.
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Title:A New History of Ireland, Volume V: Ireland Under the Union, I: 1801-1870Format:PaperbackDimensions:946 pagesPublished:February 15, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199578672

ISBN - 13:9780199578672

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Table of Contents

Oliver Macdonagh: Introduction: Ireland and the Union, 1801-701. S. J. Connolly: Aftermath and Adjustment2. S. J. Connolly: The Catholic Question, 1801-123. S. J. Connolly: Union Government, 1812-234. S. J. Connolly: Mass Politics and Sectarian Conflict, 1823-305. Cormac O Grada: Poverty, Population, and Agriculture, 1801-456. Cormac O Grada: Industry and Communications, 1801-457. Oliver MacDonagh: The Age of O'Connell, 1830-458. Oliver MacDonagh: Politics, 1830-459. Oliver MacDonagh: Ideas and Institutions, 1830-4510. Oliver MacDonagh: The Economy and Society, 1830-4511. T. W. Freeman: Land and People, c.184112. James S. Donnelly, jr: Famine and Government Response, 1845-613. James S. Donnelly, jr: Production, Prices, and Exports, 1846-5114. James S. Donnelly, jr: The Administration of Relief, 1846-715. James S. Donnelly, jr: The Soup Kitchens16. James S. Donnelly, jr: The Administration of Relief, 1847-5117. James S. Donnelly, jr: Landlords and Tenants18. James S. Donnelly, jr: Excess Mortality and Emigration19. James S. Donnelly, jr: A Famine in Irish Politics20. R. V. Comerford: Ireland 1850-70: Post-Famine and Mid-Victorian21. R. V. Comerford: Churchmen, Tenants, and Independent Opposition, 1850-5622. R. V. Comerford: Conspiring Brotherhoods and Contending Elites, 1857-6323. R. V. Comerford: Gladstone's First Irish Enterprise, 1864-7024. J. C. Brady: Legal Developments, 1801-7925. Thomas Flanagan: Literature in English, 1801-9126. D. H. Akenson: Pre-University Education, 1782-187027. R. B. McDowell: Administration and the Public Services, 1800-7028. David Fitzpatrick: Emigration, 1801-7029. David Fitzpatrick: 'A Peculiar Tramping People': The Irish in Britain, 1801-7030. Patrick J. O'Farrell: The Irish in Australia and New Zealand, 1791-187031. David Noel Doyle: The Irish in North America, 1776-184532. W. E. Vaughan: Ireland c.1870

Editorial Reviews

"important ... Almost all the chapters deserve careful reading and the volume should not be seen merely as a monument to the work of scholars in increasing our understanding over the last twenty years. It should also stimulate continued debate about the Union and the dynamic of the relationsbetween Britain and Ireland of which we are very directly the inheritors." --History