A New Path: Undergraduate Libraries At United States And Canadian Universities, 1949-1987

Hardcover | April 1, 1988

byRoland Conrad Person

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"Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based . . . on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into a skillfully synthesized examination of the undergraduate library in the United States and Canada from 1949 through 1987." Wilson Library Bulletin "Because of the work's broad scope, all individuals involved in higher education will find much of value in this new volume." Richard Johnson, SUNY Oneonta

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"Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based . . . on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:173 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:April 1, 1988Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:031325303X

ISBN - 13:9780313253034

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?Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based, in part, like Paris's study on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into a skillfully synthesized examination of the undergraduate library in the United States and Canada from 1949 through 1987. Person's primary conclusion, which is strikingly similar to Paris's, is that undergraduate libraries as a group have not seen a need to justify their existence in terms of successfully meeting their mission. That suggests, in turn, the kind of lack of leadership identified by Paris although Person does not directly address that issue. The selected bibliography is excellent and reflects the literature from the beginning of the movement to the mid-1980's. The index is very good and is appropriately detailed. The physical preparation of the volume meets Greenwood's high standards of printing and binding. Highly recommended.?-International Journal of Reviews