A Place to Stand: Politics and Persuasion in a Working-Class Bar

Paperback | December 15, 2001

byJulie Lindquist

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Linguists have become increasingly interested in examining how class culture is socially constructed and maintained through spoken language. Julie Lindquist's examination of the linguistic ethnography of a working-class bar in Chicago is an important and original contribution to the field. Sheexamines how regular patrons argue about political issues in order to create a group identity centered around political ideology. She also shows how their political arguments are actually a rhetorical genre, one which creates a delicate balance between group solidarity and individual identity, aswell as a tenuous and ambivalent sense of class identity.

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Linguists have become increasingly interested in examining how class culture is socially constructed and maintained through spoken language. Julie Lindquist's examination of the linguistic ethnography of a working-class bar in Chicago is an important and original contribution to the field. Sheexamines how regular patrons argue about po...

Julie Lindquist is at University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 9.21 × 6.1 × 0.71 inPublished:December 15, 2001Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195140389

ISBN - 13:9780195140385

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"Too much has been made, in recent thought, of the vanishing public sphere. Too little has been made of the role of the tavern in creating and sustaining the public, especially in early American life. Lindquist's valuable work can add to both these areas of inquiry. It can also inform largerquestions about what it is we yearn for when we imagine effective public language and viable political identity."--Language in Society